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Old 09-30-2009, 01:53 PM
 
Location: ITL (Houston)
9,223 posts, read 12,808,526 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by solytaire View Post
Both very true statements. Which, I have never understood how there could be a such a strong connection to a city 4+ hours away. But indeed Houston keeps a stable connection to New Orleans, and Baton Rouge and Lafayette as well.

Oddly enough, Dallas hardly even acknowledges Shreveport or Monroe from what I can tell. I guess because there is an actual sports rivalry to be shared with OKC (Thunder?, Sooners?)...but has there ever been a New Orleans/Houston sports rivalry? (Saints, Texans.. maybe?... vs. Tulane?)
Rockets and Hornets.

Saints and Texans have no reason to have a rivalry, other than that Reggie Bush/Mario Williams thing, but even that is kind of stretched.
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Old 09-30-2009, 01:59 PM
 
Location: Funky Town, Texas
3,881 posts, read 6,479,040 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MrMcCoySays View Post
Well actually I think blacks have always been a major part of Texas everywhere east of I-45.

Basically anywhere there was cotton plantations.
Basically what your doing is ignoring DFW southern roots and the towns in between. The South begins East of I 35 not I 45. You have to live here and experience it to really get a feel of the southern roots. Those big Mega Churches, gospel singers, and the soulful atmosphere of Dallas can't be ignored. Brown and Cora natives of the area from Tyler Perry plays attend church in Fort Worth, Texas. Gospel Artist Kirk Franklin is from Fort Worth, Texas you better believe we have strong proud southern tradition in DFW. DFW and Atlanta politically and culturally are mirror images of each other. Also what distinguish them from Houston is there is a large concentrated black middle class. Houston has a slightly larger black population due to the Katrina effect, but its not as concentrated as the Dallas middle class. The biggest difference between Dallas & Atlanta is Dallas has Oak trees and Atlanta has the numerous Pine trees.
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Old 09-30-2009, 02:04 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by solytaire View Post
This is true...Have you ever heard that there is something called the "Lost Pines" in Central/East Central Texas around Bastrop, TX? They are not in close enough proximity to be grouped with the Pineywoods of East Texas nor the pine trees found throughout the Southeast. But its actually a HUGE stand of pines that sits squarely in Central Texas..

I found that strange, but yeah..I agree with the last bolded statement. I think both Austin and San Antonio are definitely more influenced by western cultures (Austin, western) (San Antonio, Southwestern) than both Dallas or Houston. I think Dallas is an admixture of weak Midwestern, Californian, and mild Southern influences. But Im definitely starting to see why some people try to lump Dallas in with the central plain cities/midwestern cities (I personally see it as a mixture between St. Louis, Kansas City and Memphis).

The southern aura isnt as palpable in Dallas as it is in Houston or East Texas. And the landscape doesnt share many similarities with the landscape found in a majority of Southern areas. Also Houston REALLY maintains its connection with Louisiana and Cajun culture - and even Mississippi to an extent. Dallas enjoys a greater kinship with Oklahoma, which some wouldnt consider a particularly Deep South state (although still southern.)

Anywho, in general I judge both regions by their outlying communities. Those rural/suburban communities just outside of Houston honestly feel like the Deep South and/or Gulf Coast regions.. (Cleveland, Conroe, Humble, Katy, Tomball, Pasadena, Baytown, MO City etc.). Those rural or suburban communities just outside of Dallas also feel southern..but not deep southern...they feel southern like places found in Southeast Oklahoma and in Central Texas.
I agree 100%. I think I head of the Lost Pines though. It's so strange. And most cities east of Houston couldn't more Southern then they already are.
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Old 09-30-2009, 02:10 PM
 
Location: Underneath the Pecan Tree
15,989 posts, read 28,339,160 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MrMcCoySays View Post
Well actually I think blacks have always been a major part of Texas everywhere east of I-45.

Basically anywhere there was cotton plantations.
More like east of I-35.
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Old 09-30-2009, 02:13 PM
 
Location: Funky Town, Texas
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jluke65780 View Post
More like east of I-35.
Thanks bro!!!!!
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Old 09-30-2009, 02:14 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Spade View Post
While Houston maybe the beginning of the American South. I would say you wouldn't know until you hit Beaumont. However I will disagree with you in that Houston has no traces of Southwestern culture. The Hispanic culture is a huge part of Houston now and they are in no way Southern as we know it as. We can't forget that part of Houston. Not to mention that Houston has a strong connection with California to an extent. But Houston is very similar to South Louisiana but moreso Lake Charles to Baton Rouge than New Orleans.

Now Houston and Southern Louisiana has connections because simply it is the biggest city in the immediate region and people have family in both places. Same cannot be said with Dallas and Louisiana except Shreveport. Shreveport is more like Texas than it is the rest of the state besides the accent. Dallas has a connection with Oklahoma, Arkansas and other Great Plains Midwestern and Mid-South states. That's kind of unique that you have two cities in one state like that.
Very true about Houston. I said that about Houston because of the topography and geography of Houston, alot of pine trees in the eastern part, and it's position on the gulf coast just seemed Southern to me. But as you head WEST in Houston the "TEXAN" characteristics start coming into play, and it gets even less Southern. I agree once you drive EAST of Houston into Port Arthur and Beaumont that's when you start seeing the REAL Southern characteristics.
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Old 09-30-2009, 02:15 PM
 
3,424 posts, read 4,841,918 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by polo89 View Post
I agree 100%. I think I head of the Lost Pines though. It's so strange. And most cities east of Houston couldn't more Southern then they already are.

Exactly...I kind of think of DFW as being where the south begins...but I think Houston is solidly inside the South...might sound weird but just that slight south and eastern delineation puts Houston in a Gulf Coastal/(almost) Deep South category...whereas Dallas is, as someone mentioned a while back, a central south feeling city through and through... I cant figure out whether its because of the transplants or the location or the reputation it has, but its pretty hard for me to place Austin into a southern category at all. I would almost say that San Antonio is more akin to southern mood and vibe than Austin. Obviously San Antonio isnt thoroughly southern, but it feels closer to a southern stereotype than Austin. Although neither are real stereotypical southern cities.
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Old 09-30-2009, 02:17 PM
 
Location: Funky Town, Texas
3,881 posts, read 6,479,040 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by polo89 View Post
Very true about Houston. I said that about Houston because of the topography and geography of Houston, alot of pine trees in the eastern part, and it's position on the gulf coast just seemed Southern to me. But as you head WEST in Houston the "TEXAN" characteristics start coming into play, and it gets even less Southern. I agree once you drive EAST of Houston into Port Arthur and Beaumont that's when you start seeing the REAL Southern characteristics.
Southern Characteristics as far as geography, but what about the people and the history. The entire south is not dominated by pine trees. A myth that should be dispelled.
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Old 09-30-2009, 02:19 PM
 
Location: Underneath the Pecan Tree
15,989 posts, read 28,339,160 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by solytaire View Post
Exactly...I kind of think of DFW as being where the south begins...but I think Houston is solidly inside the South...might sound weird but just that slight south and eastern delineation puts Houston in a Gulf Coastal/(almost) Deep South category...whereas Dallas is, as someone mentioned a while back, a central south feeling city through and through... I cant figure out whether its because of the transplants or the location or the reputation it has, but its pretty hard for me to place Austin into a southern category. I would almost say that San Antonio is more akin to southern mood and vibe than Austin. Obviously San Antonio isnt thoroughly southern, but it feels closer to a southern stereotype than Austin. Although neither are real stereotypical southern cities.
I disagree big time. Austin would definitely fit more into the southern category than San Antonio. The whole "Austin" feels like California or more western is overrated. The city has southern influence to me.
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Old 09-30-2009, 02:20 PM
 
13,902 posts, read 20,658,449 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kdogg817 View Post
The African American Community is very deeply bonded with East Texas. Towns like Tyler, Marshall, Longview, Lufikin, Waskom, and even as far as away as Monroe, Louisiana etc...My grandfather roots came from the Marshall/ Waskom area before they migrated to the predominantly African Commiunity of East Fort Worth back in the day.

Lets not forget about the historic Stop Six Community & its next door neighboor Eastwood of East Fort Worth.
That's true. But you can find Southernness in many black communities all across the US. In Miami, which is MOSTLY Latin-American, once you go to the Liberty City, Overtown, Brownsville, Carol City, or any black neighborhood you start to see the southern characteristics of Miami.
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