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Old 09-30-2009, 02:59 PM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
13,463 posts, read 14,945,293 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by solytaire View Post
lol...I cant say that I wholeheartedly agreed with that statement either..I havent noticed any distinguishable difference in the East TX (Tyler - Marshall) and Shreveport accent.
Well honestly. I hear it. Maybe you can't because you've been around it longer than I but I can actually hear a difference between East Texas and Shreveport.
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Old 09-30-2009, 03:02 PM
 
2,532 posts, read 3,756,739 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kdogg817 View Post
Crowley, Texas has seen a explosion in the African American population. Check the 2010 census when it comes out. Also Desoto, Lancaster, Cedar hill along with South Arlington and Mansfield have also seen tremendous gains as well. Black Enterpise ranks Dallas # 5 on the 2005 list for best places for African Americans. Lets not forget Steve harvey, Tom Joyner, Ricky Smiley and Michael Baisden all based out of Dallas. I would say Houston gets more attention though "Beyonce" and the hip hop game in H-Town. Dallas still lags behind in that category (huge underground).

Blacks in Dallas - Where and why African Americans are choosing Dallas

I've seen that BID site, and it provides great information about the area. I know several people who have relocated to D/FW in the last decade, and seem to be doing very well there. I haven't ran into people that absolutely hate it, I'll put it that way. Even then, it seems like Dallas is still under the radar with a lot of people, it doesn't get nearly the attention and hype that Atlanta gets. Which is a good thing in my book. Too many people move here and expect it to be like it is in Tyler Perry movies or reality shows on TV. Moving here (or anywhere for that matter) without a plan is a Man Down, Code 10 situation, you know?

And yes, all those syndicated radio hosts did get their start in Dallas. I think Russ Parr got his start in Dallas too.

Houston was #1 in Black Enterprise one year, but it's rank fell to #4 another year. Dallas was #4 or 5 from what I remember.
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Old 09-30-2009, 03:02 PM
 
Location: 75025 (previously 75254, 90505, 90010, and 60614)
10,263 posts, read 11,034,825 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kdogg817 View Post
Basically what your doing is ignoring DFW southern roots and the towns in between. The South begins East of I 35 not I 45. You have to live here and experience it to really get a feel of the southern roots. Those big Mega Churches, gospel singers, and the soulful atmosphere of Dallas can't be ignored. Brown and Cora natives of the area from Tyler Perry plays attend church in Fort Worth, Texas. Gospel Artist Kirk Franklin is from Fort Worth, Texas you better believe we have strong proud southern tradition in DFW. DFW and Atlanta politically and culturally are mirror images of each other. Also what distinguish them from Houston is there is a large concentrated black middle class. Houston has a slightly larger black population due to the Katrina effect, but its not as concentrated as the Dallas middle class. The biggest difference between Dallas & Atlanta is Dallas has Oak trees and Atlanta has the numerous Pine trees.
DFW and Metro Atlanta might be mirror images of each other from a city planning stand point, but they are demograpically different and thus have some distinct cultural differences as well. DFW will never be the black super Mecca that Atlanta is. DFW isnt nearly as southern as Atlanta is. Atlanta will never be as Latino as DFW or a hub for Latin American culture like DFW is.

Definately not saying that Dallas doesnt have southerness about it, but not nearly to the degree Atlanta does.
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Old 09-30-2009, 03:06 PM
 
Location: Funky Town, Texas
3,596 posts, read 4,310,459 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LAnative10 View Post
DFW and Metro Atlanta might be mirror images of each other from a city planning stand point, but they are demograpically different and thus have some distinct cultural differences as well. DFW will never be the black super Mecca that Atlanta is. DFW isnt nearly as southern as Atlanta is. Atlanta will never be as Latino as DFW or a hub for Latin American culture like DFW is.

Definately not saying that Dallas doesnt have southerness about it, but not nearly to the degree Atlanta does.
Very True
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Old 09-30-2009, 03:06 PM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
13,463 posts, read 14,945,293 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MrMcCoySays View Post
But the invasive cultures are different from the cultures that were naturally there, and Houston is naturally southern through and through. It is still rooted in the south, and there are many places throughout the metro that are completely uninfluenced by Mexico or California.

And as far as that Shreveport accent being different from Texas.....well, nevermind. You and I both know that debate is a long journey.
Never said Houston wasn't southern or isn't southern. I was just saying that Houston has some southwestern and hispanic traces. Believe it or not, they will become the largest demographic in the metro area in the next 5-10 years. Also, I didn't say influence when it comes to California. I said connection. But you can add influence in there if you like. There isn't much of a connection with California and states east of Texas. But you can tell it's there in Houston. From it's music to the way some of the suburbs are after world war 2 to an extent. Why do you think people say Houston is like the mini LA or how Houston's and LA's skyline silhoutte look alike.

Also, name another Southern state that has been influenced by Mexico other than Texas to a major degree. I would not underestimate that.
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Old 09-30-2009, 03:06 PM
 
3,424 posts, read 3,469,450 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by polo89 View Post
Yes indeed it does have a Southern influence to it, within the Black community, and the native whites tend to have Southern accents. But that's basically where it ENDS. Nothing more. EVERYTHING ELSE, including the Tejano influence, Cactus being native to the area, No pine trees, Limestone hills, dry grassland and shrubbery, proximity to South Texas, all of that gives it a undeniably Western influence.

See I tend to disagree with this statement..Ive noticed no discernible accent in Austin at all, and there is barely any black population. Neither are prevalent in Austin from my experience, and both are things that I consider pretty intrinsic to southern culture. Its also why I think that Dallas and Houston are Southern when it comes down to it..I hear southern accents in Dallas and especially in Ft. Worth...and many native Houstonians have southern accents as well...
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Old 09-30-2009, 03:07 PM
 
Location: The land of sugar... previously Houston and Austin
5,345 posts, read 9,098,131 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MrMcCoySays View Post
As far as blacks in Texas, Houston's black population has always been larger than Dallas'. Even before Katrina. And while Houston's black middle class may be less concentrated, I'd still say it mirrors Atlanta more than Dallas.
You sure about that? Looks like Houston is actually the least of the three...

From city-data:

Houston
25.3% Black

Dallas
25.9% Black

Atlanta
61.4% Black
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Old 09-30-2009, 03:08 PM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
13,463 posts, read 14,945,293 times
Reputation: 5065
Quote:
Originally Posted by LAnative10 View Post
DFW and Metro Atlanta might be mirror images of each other from a city planning stand point, but they are demograpically different and thus have some distinct cultural differences as well. DFW will never be the black super Mecca that Atlanta is. DFW isnt nearly as southern as Atlanta is. Atlanta will never be as Latino as DFW or a hub for Latin American culture like DFW is.

Definately not saying that Dallas doesnt have southerness about it, but not nearly to the degree Atlanta does.
Agreed.
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Old 09-30-2009, 03:09 PM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
13,463 posts, read 14,945,293 times
Reputation: 5065
Quote:
Originally Posted by AK123 View Post
You sure about that? Looks like Houston is actually the least of the three...

From city-data:

Houston
25.3% Black

Dallas
25.9% Black

Atlanta
61.4% Black
Well when it comes to raw numbers, Houston has the most. The percentages won't show it, though. When it comes to metro areas, Atlanta has the most.
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Old 09-30-2009, 03:09 PM
 
2,532 posts, read 3,756,739 times
Reputation: 1190
Quote:
Originally Posted by LAnative10 View Post
DFW and Metro Atlanta might be mirror images of each other from a city planning stand point, but they are demograpically different and thus have some distinct cultural differences as well. DFW will never be the black super Mecca that Atlanta is. DFW isnt nearly as southern as Atlanta is. Atlanta will never be as Latino as DFW or a hub for Latin American culture like DFW is.

Definately not saying that Dallas doesnt have southerness about it, but not nearly to the degree Atlanta does.

I agree with what you're saying, BUT give me Dallas' planning any day over Atlanta's. Of course, Dallas has the advantage of being flatter, but they're grid system and freeway system totally trump Atlanta's. One of the principle reasons why Atlanta's traffic congestion can get so bad is because there are very few arterial alternatives to the freeways, and the ones that are alternatives are usually too narrow. There is no rhyme or reason to the street system in Atlanta. If the LBJ freeway is too crowded, I have Belt Line or Forest Ln as alternatives. But if the Top End of I-285 is congested? I'm pretty much stuck . One of the reasons I joined a gym was to avoid rush hours. I've lost 70 pounds instead of sitting in congestion cursing and snacking, so there was a benefit I guess.
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