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Old 09-29-2009, 07:51 PM
 
Location: Funky Town, Texas
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LAnative10 View Post
I would throw Longview, Carthage, and Jasper on that list.

Terrell feels somewhat Southern to me, but not to the degree as the other cities on your list.

Yes this really is so subjective I think Marlin and Hearne, Texas are very southern in nature. Those towns fall into the central Texas region. Thats why I just say anything East of I 35 in my book is southern.
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Old 09-29-2009, 08:32 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by polo89 View Post
Once you drive west OF I-45 Texas Southernness starts to fade. But overall parts of Houston feel just as Southern as Atlanta. But Houston is soooo big, so it can't just be molded into one shape. Houston is a mix between Southern, Cajun, Tropical(in the south towards the gulf), but with no traces of Southwestern culture, other than the LARGE Hispanic population. Can't deny this, and Dallas is just a large mixture of South, Frontier West, and MAYBE a little bit of Southwest. Austin has traces of Southern culture, but NOTHING obviously southern. I'd really hesitate to call Austin Southern, but it CAN be seen as Southern to SOME. Even CACTUS is native to Austin. So that just leaves us with SA. San Antonio!? A Southern city!?! LOL, San Antonio is about as Southern as DC or Baltimore. San Antonio on WEST in TX is undoubtedly the beginning of the American SOUTHWEST. While Austin to DFW, I35 and everywhere in between is debatable, and Houston and everywhere EAST of I45 is undoubtedly the beginning of the American SOUTH. Does anyone agree?

^^ Agreed...I also agree with KDogg however, that Hearne and some East Central TX cities (Like Buffalo, Marlin etc.) have a pretty strong Southern aura to them...
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Old 09-29-2009, 08:59 PM
 
13,980 posts, read 21,618,793 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kdogg817 View Post
This is a southern as it get in the state of Texas

Beaumont
Marshall (My favorite east Texas town "Very nice scenery")
Port Arthur
Tyler
Wiley
Terrell
Add Vidor to that list.
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Old 09-29-2009, 09:07 PM
 
13,980 posts, read 21,618,793 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by solytaire View Post
^^ Agreed...I also agree with KDogg however, that Hearne and some East Central TX cities (Like Buffalo, Marlin etc.) have a pretty strong Southern aura to them...
That is true, about Hearne and Buffalo, but I've never been to Marlin. Could Elgin be added to that list, because Elgin seems like it's on the transition zone between East TX and Central TX. I remember being younger when I lived in Austin and actually seeing the transition, with the abundance of piney trees growing driving EAST from Austin. Same when we drove through Giddings on our way to Houston. Living in Austin you RARELY, if at all see pine trees. Austin is a whole other animal. I would MAYBE even group Austin in the same category as San Antonio. Austin and Central Texas in general felt more Western if anything.
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Old 09-29-2009, 09:21 PM
 
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Originally Posted by polo89 View Post
Add Vidor to that list.

True..But Vidor, PA, Beaumont and Marshall kind of belong in Louisiana to be honest.
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Old 09-29-2009, 09:26 PM
 
Location: Underneath the Pecan Tree
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Quote:
Originally Posted by solytaire View Post
True..But Vidor, PA, Beaumont and Marshall kind of belong in Louisiana to be honest.
Yes and Austin belongs to California and San Antonio belongs to Mexico.
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Old 09-29-2009, 09:41 PM
 
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Originally Posted by polo89 View Post
That is true, about Hearne and Buffalo, but I've never been to Marlin. Could Elgin be added to that list, because Elgin seems like it's on the transition zone between East TX and Central TX. I remember being younger when I lived in Austin and actually seeing the transition, with the abundance of piney trees growing driving EAST from Austin. Same when we drove through Giddings on our way to Houston. Living in Austin you RARELY, if at all see pine trees. Austin is a whole other animal. I would MAYBE even group Austin in the same category as San Antonio. Austin and Central Texas in general felt more Western if anything.

This is true...Have you ever heard that there is something called the "Lost Pines" in Central/East Central Texas around Bastrop, TX? They are not in close enough proximity to be grouped with the Pineywoods of East Texas nor the pine trees found throughout the Southeast. But its actually a HUGE stand of pines that sits squarely in Central Texas..

I found that strange, but yeah..I agree with the last bolded statement. I think both Austin and San Antonio are definitely more influenced by western cultures (Austin, western) (San Antonio, Southwestern) than both Dallas or Houston. I think Dallas is an admixture of weak Midwestern, Californian, and mild Southern influences. But Im definitely starting to see why some people try to lump Dallas in with the central plain cities/midwestern cities (I personally see it as a mixture between St. Louis, Kansas City and Memphis).

The southern aura isnt as palpable in Dallas as it is in Houston or East Texas. And the landscape doesnt share many similarities with the landscape found in a majority of Southern areas. Also Houston REALLY maintains its connection with Louisiana and Cajun culture - and even Mississippi to an extent. Dallas enjoys a greater kinship with Oklahoma, which some wouldnt consider a particularly Deep South state (although still southern.)

Anywho, in general I judge both regions by their outlying communities. Those rural/suburban communities just outside of Houston honestly feel like the Deep South and/or Gulf Coast regions.. (Cleveland, Conroe, Humble, Katy, Tomball, Pasadena, Baytown, MO City etc.). Those rural or suburban communities just outside of Dallas also feel southern..but not deep southern...they feel southern like places found in Southeast Oklahoma and in Central Texas.
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Old 09-29-2009, 09:44 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jluke65780 View Post
Yes and Austin belongs to California and San Antonio belongs to Mexico.
I agree. San Antonio and most of South Texas seems like it could very well belong to Mexico. And you're right Austin does also feel as though it belongs in some part of CA.
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Old 09-29-2009, 10:13 PM
 
Location: ITL (Houston)
9,223 posts, read 13,286,922 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by polo89 View Post
So that just leaves us with SA. San Antonio!? A Southern city!?! LOL, San Antonio is about as Southern as DC or Baltimore. San Antonio on WEST in TX is undoubtedly the beginning of the American SOUTHWEST. While Austin to DFW, I35 and everywhere in between is debatable, and Houston and everywhere EAST of I45 is undoubtedly the beginning of the American SOUTH. Does anyone agree?
You can make a case for DC being Southern...
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Old 09-30-2009, 09:39 AM
 
103 posts, read 248,441 times
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Originally Posted by TXNGL View Post
Fashion/Style: Dallas was very conservative and boring I notice. We all went to the Dallas Galleria (Houstons is better!!!) and the ritzy Stonebriar Centre in suburban Frisco and my friends and I was like, wow, the people here are very kakis and polo shirts or plan Librarian types. Not alternative or stylish fashionistas like you see more in Houston.>>

You went to the wrong places! :-) Most of the people I see walking around the Galleria (Yes, I think Houston's is better) are from out of town. You'll see trendier Dallasites closer in to the city. Stonbriar? Forget it! Most are transplants to Texas when you get that far out, and Stonebriar is just a typical suburban mall, IMO. You'd get a better idea of what you're looking for even at Northpark. But for "trendy", you need to visit the young, singles areas of Dallas...Uptown, for example. For alternative fashion, maybe lower Greenville.
Okay I will, but I did notice the "Dallitude" up in Frisco, we ate at a Chilies by Stonebriar and the suburban girls and guys looked like they step out of the Laguna Beach or 90210 or something. Very preppy/expenisive trendy. Even the moms we typical Dallas blonde and snobbish.
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