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Old 10-06-2009, 09:39 PM
 
Location: Charlotte, NC (in my mind)
7,946 posts, read 14,311,624 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DeaconJ View Post
I don't know...Atlanta was well-developed prior to the auto culture, but it certainly isn't considered a "real city" by many city-data members.
Atlanta might be a real city but it certainly is a sprawl. When driving through on I-20, the metro region starts at around mile marker 86 and goes all the way to the Alabama border. Considering the population density, this is definitely a real problem. Cities like Atlanta are the reason the US will be in such bad trouble if there is another oil shock.
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Old 10-06-2009, 09:41 PM
 
Location: NYC
1,158 posts, read 3,090,051 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dncr View Post
Did I ever say L.A was a "fake" city? Living in L.A, you definitely need a car. There is no argument to that. Don't try to start an argument opposing an already well known fact.
You don't "definitely" need a car in LA. Regardless of what you think, there is an argument to that. Yes, life is much easier with a car, but I know quite a few people who live here and don't drive and they get by perfectly fine. Have you ever ridden mass transit in LA? Ever ridden the Red, Blue, Gold, or Green Line? Ever taken the 720 bus down to Beverly Hills or Santa Monica? Or the 780 from Hollywood to Melrose, the Grove, or LACMA? Or the 2 down to the Sunset Strip? Or Santa Monica's Big Blue Bus from Third Street Promenade to UCLA? Because I have. I've used LA's mass transit extensively and I see buses and trains that are extremely crowded all the time so I think I know what I'm talking about.

And you didn't address the other issue I had with your previous post. What about New Orleans?
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Old 10-06-2009, 09:54 PM
 
Location: 30-40N 90-100W
13,856 posts, read 21,801,770 times
Reputation: 6640
From what I've been able to gather the "realness" of a city seems to be judged on a mix of population density, mass transit, and non-Southerness. If a city is in a state that was ever in the Confederacy it's not "a real city." Or "realness" is simply based on how similar a city is to New York City.

It's possible that a solid history could matter. There is maybe a certain "fakeness" in places like Las Vegas in that so much is new or impermanent and there's not much "roots." As mentioned though that doesn't entirely work. Atlanta, Memphis, and San Antonio all had over 50,000 people in 1900 so they have history as cities. I'm not sure any of those are seen as "real cities" here. Hence "non-Southerness" as a crucial ingredient.
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Old 10-06-2009, 09:54 PM
 
110 posts, read 71,723 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bchris02 View Post
Atlanta might be a real city but it certainly is a sprawl. When driving through on I-20, the metro region starts at around mile marker 86 and goes all the way to the Alabama border. Considering the population density, this is definitely a real problem. Cities like Atlanta are the reason the US will be in such bad trouble if there is another oil shock.
Yes, Atlanta is very sprawled, which makes it feel less of a city, especially for its 5.7 million metro size. Also, Atlanta has held onto the Alabama culture, which contributes to a even smaller feel. And I completely agree with your oil comment. After all, Atlanta is one of the only cities in the United States to be proud of their SIXTEEN lane freeways.
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Old 10-06-2009, 10:02 PM
 
Location: Charlotte, NC (in my mind)
7,946 posts, read 14,311,624 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HudsonCounty View Post
Yes, Atlanta is very sprawled, which makes it feel less of a city, especially for it’s 5.7 million metro size. Also, Atlanta has held onto the Alabama culture, which contributes to a even smaller feel. And I completely agree with your oil comment. After all, Atlanta is one of the only cities in the United States to be proud of their SIXTEEN lane freeways.
I agree. Most cities take pride in their density, mass transit, signature skyscrapers, etc but Atlanta, AL takes pride in its 16 lane freeways which encourage more and more sprawl. If your dream city is miles and miles of McMansions and Walmarts and 1.5 hour commutes in bumper to bumper traffic, you would probably like Atlanta. I also agree with your Alabama culture assessment. NASCAR is extremely popular in Atlanta as the metro region extends almost to Talladega speedway.

Last edited by bchris02; 10-06-2009 at 10:17 PM..
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Old 10-06-2009, 10:07 PM
 
787 posts, read 1,396,777 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HudsonCounty View Post
Yes, Atlanta is very sprawled, which makes it feel less of a city, especially for its 5.7 million metro size. Also, Atlanta has held onto the Alabama culture, which contributes to a even smaller feel. And I completely agree with your oil comment. After all, Atlanta is one of the only cities in the United States to be proud of their SIXTEEN lane freeways.

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Old 10-06-2009, 10:17 PM
 
6,117 posts, read 9,376,803 times
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Real cities gain population. Fake cities lose population.
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Old 10-06-2009, 10:42 PM
 
Location: SF and Atlanta
173 posts, read 395,399 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HudsonCounty View Post
After all, Atlanta is one of the only cities in the United States to be proud of their SIXTEEN lane freeways.
I'm more proud of Atlanta's 48 miles of heavy rail transit running 20 hours per day with 38 stops. I'm also more proud the 22 miles of new lightrail underway with parks and bike lanes. And I'm proud that Atlanta's urban core jumped 25% in population over the past 8 years. But your aging stereotype is a lot more fun.
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Old 10-06-2009, 10:45 PM
 
13,965 posts, read 21,494,288 times
Reputation: 4031
This has just turned into another Atlanta BASH fest. Gross.
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Old 10-06-2009, 10:47 PM
 
13,965 posts, read 21,494,288 times
Reputation: 4031
Well I like 16Lane Highways, McMansions, Walmarts, and McDonalds. Like these are negative things.
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