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View Poll Results: Which city is MORE Southern,Dallas or Atlanta?Why?
Dallas 14 18.67%
Atlanta 61 81.33%
Voters: 75. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 10-07-2009, 06:14 AM
 
Location: Atlanta ,GA
9,087 posts, read 11,995,213 times
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http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/a3/US_map-The_South_Modern_.png (broken link)
This math came from Wiki in an article about the South.

This was said about Texas as its role in the South:
Quote:
The size and cultural distinctiveness of Texas prohibit easy categorization of the entire state in any recognized region. Geographic, economic, and cultural diversity among regions of the state preclude treating Texas as a region in its own right. The larger cities of Texas with their burgeoning knowledge economies have attracted migrants from other regions of the United States and immigrants from Latin America and Asia. However, partly due to its membership in the Confederacy, and the fact much of the state is in the Bible Belt, it is usually considered a Southern state rather than a Western one. Also, linguistic maps of Texas place most of the state within the spheres of upper, mid and gulf Southern dialects, helping to further identify the state as being Southern (use of Southern colloquialisms such as y'all is still very much widespread in Texas).


Here is also a demographic picture by race in the South.Notice how in Texas the areas in and around Dallas and Northeast of Houston resemble more to Georgia than west Texas:


And this on Southern Dialect:Culture of the Southern United States - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 10-07-2009, 06:27 AM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
17,569 posts, read 23,779,231 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by afonega1 View Post
Thats your opinion.I personally do not see a major difference at all.Like what in Dallas makes it LESS Southern or more Western?What are Dallas's "western" roots?The demographics are very similar.The only major difference is the Hispanic population is about 15%-20% more than Atlanta.That is not a great difference but its significant, yet where does it show in the culture or even the history of the City?Just because their are currently more Hispanics living there does today ,does not make it less Southern,because Atlanta has a large Hispanic population as well.
As of 2000, Atlanta's Hispanic population was 18,000. Dallas Hispanic population was 422,000. That's not only a significant difference, but a major difference. I'll try to find metro population statistics. Atlanta's Hispanic population is not nearly threatning to become the largest minority population compared to Dallas which it has. Again, as I stated before, Dallas is surrounded by areas that are no doubt Southern or questionable Southern. Atlanta is not surrounded by anything like that. Their pull and connections from most areas in and throughout the South helps Atlanta to retain that Southern culture. Dallas on the other hand has pull in some parts of the South, many parts of Texas and up towards Kansas and West to New Mexico.
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Old 10-07-2009, 06:51 AM
 
Location: Willowbend/Houston
12,933 posts, read 18,452,818 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Spade View Post
As of 2000, Atlanta's Hispanic population was 18,000. Dallas Hispanic population was 422,000. That's not only a significant difference, but a major difference. I'll try to find metro population statistics. Atlanta's Hispanic population is not nearly threatning to become the largest minority population compared to Dallas which it has. Again, as I stated before, Dallas is surrounded by areas that are no doubt Southern or questionable Southern. Atlanta is not surrounded by anything like that. Their pull and connections from most areas in and throughout the South helps Atlanta to retain that Southern culture. Dallas on the other hand has pull in some parts of the South, many parts of Texas and up towards Kansas and West to New Mexico.
Im glad you brought this up. 422,000 might have been the population in 2000, but check out the link below. Dallas county lost 139,000 white people between 2000 and 2007. But Dallas county gained 222,000 Latinos in that same time span. Tarrant county gained 39,000 white people but also gained 129,000 Latinos in that time span.

Swing State Project: Demographic Sea Change in Texas
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Old 10-07-2009, 06:56 AM
 
Location: Willowbend/Houston
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Quote:
Originally Posted by afonega1 View Post
Tejano Music?Yuck.I hear that here in Atlanta too.You can go to many places in the city and hear a live tejano band play.The Ranching culture,I will give you that,but thats about one of the only major things I see.The foods are just as popular here in Atlanta as they are in Dallas.That did not come from Dallas,it came from Mexico.Houston is MUCH more all these things,but Dallas?I don't see it.
But Tejano is not culturally engrained in Atlanta. It is in Texas. Think about the word Tejano. Its used to describe Texas and Mexican decent. So that is something that Atlanta cannot claim. Same thing with the food. Tex-Mex originates here in Texas, it is not engrained in Atlantas culture. And the geography? The land scape here isnt characteristic of the South, its morse of the midwest.

Just because you can get Tex-Mex food in Atlanta and hear Tejano music in Atlanta doesnt really say anything about its culture. Just that there are some people there who like to eat and listen to that.

So once again, I say Dallas is a combination of South, Western, and Midwestern.
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Old 10-07-2009, 07:02 AM
 
10,166 posts, read 15,728,868 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by grindin View Post
Like I said in the previous post where this was bought up, D/FW is a "border" town. it's where the cultures of the Western South, the western Midwest and the Southwest converge. Heck, kudzu doesn't even grow there, LOL. To me, Texas doesn't really get southern until you head a bit east or south. But Ft Worth? Not so much. It feels like a larger, more sophisticated OKC. It certainly doesn't feel like say, Little Rock or Shreveport. Atlanta is firmly ensconed inthe south in geography and culture. No matter how many transplants move here.
I see your points here, but am going to disagree on some of them. "Western South" is about the best way to describe most of Texas generally along and west of the DFW area (excluding the trans-pecos which is truly Southwestern). It was overwhelmingly settled by Southerners and that culture dominated even if the topography is much different than that generally associated with the Southeast (which some -- although I don't agree -- consider to be synonymous with "the South").

The term "western South" is really what the original designation "Southwest" referred to -- when applied to Texas -- that is, a blend of the basic history and culture of the South but heavily flavored with characteristics of the post-bellum western frontier (i.e. cattle, ranching, cowboys, etc). However, in this instance, the labels "Western" and "Southern" did not have to be at odds with one another. It was simply a new dimension of the South itself.

On the other hand, there are considerable differences with the true Southwest of New Mexico and Arizona. Nothing about these states is Southern (except that a small slice of eastern New Mexico, largely settled by Texans, has a number of Southern Baptist Churches, and one can detect traces of a Texas accent) and the Mexican/Native American influence dominated from the start, something not true of even most of West Texas. This was/is a different Southwest than what describes most of Texas. Dallas and even Ft. Worth are vastly different from Santa Fe or Albequerque or Tucon (although El Paso would fit right in).

As for Midwestern? There are definitely some topographical similiarites, and with the many northern transplants and bland suburbs in the DFW area, yeah, there is something to that the area has a certain Midwestern flavor to it. However, the historical culture of this area is far different from a Kansas or Nebraska, and very few residents would identify themselves as Midwestern or living in the Midwest.

And Kdogg 817 is definitely right when he points out the strong Southern roots and flavor of goodly parts of old Dallas and Ft. Worth...

But anyway, I have enjoyed reading your posts on the subject, even if I disagree with parts of them. And I have to admit I did a double-take when I first read the thread title! LOL

Last edited by TexasReb; 10-07-2009 at 08:10 AM..
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Old 10-07-2009, 07:25 AM
Status: "October already?" (set 4 days ago)
 
Location: Atlanta and St Simons Island, GA
17,409 posts, read 29,231,911 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Spade View Post
As of 2000, Atlanta's Hispanic population was 18,000. Dallas Hispanic population was 422,000. That's not only a significant difference, but a major difference. I'll try to find metro population statistics. Atlanta's Hispanic population is not nearly threatning to become the largest minority population compared to Dallas which it has. Again, as I stated before, Dallas is surrounded by areas that are no doubt Southern or questionable Southern. Atlanta is not surrounded by anything like that. Their pull and connections from most areas in and throughout the South helps Atlanta to retain that Southern culture. Dallas on the other hand has pull in some parts of the South, many parts of Texas and up towards Kansas and West to New Mexico.
Good idea, because limiting these statistics to Atlanta's city limits is highly misleading. The major Hispanic neighborhoods here are located outside the city...northern Gwinnett and DeKalb Counties, southern Cobb and Douglas Counties, Clayton County et al. Atlanta does not have the Hispanic presence that Dallas does, clearly, but it is far larger than 18,000 residents, I'm sure.
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Old 10-07-2009, 07:39 AM
 
Location: Atlanta
2,847 posts, read 5,114,449 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LovinDecatur View Post
Good idea, because limiting these statistics to Atlanta's city limits is highly misleading. The major Hispanic neighborhoods here are located outside the city...northern Gwinnett and DeKalb Counties, southern Cobb and Douglas Counties, Clayton County et al. Atlanta does not have the Hispanic presence that Dallas does, clearly, but it is far larger than 18,000 residents, I'm sure.
True, Hispanics in Georgia tend to be more attracted to the suburbs of Atlanta than to the actual city. As a matter of fact. You will see a much larger percent of Hispanics living in rural towns in Middle and South Georgia than you see living in Atlanta city limits. Hall county in North Metro Atlanta for example has a really high Hispanic prescence. (Almost 20% Hispanic).
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Old 10-07-2009, 08:52 AM
 
Location: Funky Town, Texas
3,846 posts, read 6,412,672 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LAnative10 View Post
Im glad you brought this up. 422,000 might have been the population in 2000, but check out the link below. Dallas county lost 139,000 white people between 2000 and 2007. But Dallas county gained 222,000 Latinos in that same time span. Tarrant county gained 39,000 white people but also gained 129,000 Latinos in that time span.

Swing State Project: Demographic Sea Change in Texas
Its also worth noting that hispanics outnumbering blacks in Dallas is a recent occurrence wasn't until the year 2000 that hispanics over took blacks in Dallas in population. The hispanic population is on the rise nationwide. No other group is growing like the hispanic population. From extremely high birth rates to immigration from mexico. Pretty soon they will be the majority in America.Texas is a good example of whats instored in the deep south in the future.

Latino baby boom follows New Orleans hurricane - Americas - International Herald Tribune

http://www.nytimes.com/2006/12/11/wo...y.3860570.html
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Old 10-07-2009, 09:10 AM
 
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kdogg you left out Heisman winner Tim Brown! He's the second Heisman winner from my Dallas high school, WWHS.



That's Tim at our high school's 80th Anniversary with my contemporary, Anne (now has a kid at Woodrow).. our next superstar, Sergio Kindle, is in the background!
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Old 10-07-2009, 09:17 AM
 
Location: Willowbend/Houston
12,933 posts, read 18,452,818 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kdogg817 View Post
Its also worth noting that hispanics outnumbering blacks in Dallas is a recent occurrence wasn't until the year 2000 that hispanics over took blacks in Dallas in population. The hispanic population is on the rise nationwide. No other group is growing like the hispanic population. From extremely high birth rates to immigration from mexico. Pretty soon they will be the majority in America.Texas is a good example of whats instored in the deep south in the future.

Latino baby boom follows New Orleans hurricane - Americas - International Herald Tribune

http://www.nytimes.com/2006/12/11/wo...y.3860570.html
I know Hispanics havent always outnumbered blacks in the Metroplex, but I thought the change happened earlier than 2000. I might be wrong, but I thought it happend late 80's.
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