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Old 04-07-2010, 04:56 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AlGreen View Post
thanks solytaire

what kind of poplar is that exactly? i believe east texas does have some varieties of cottonwoods and such.

it may be just from what i seen, but it seemes like georgia has more varieties of maples..as far as pines go, there may be some types i'm not aware of, but i do know that longleaf, loblolly, and shortleaf pine are all pretty widespread in both east texas and georgia

That is the yellow poplar range..

As far as pines, you're right..but if Im not mistaken Upper East Texas only Has longleafs and loblollies...while Deep East Texas/southeast Texas contains loblollies, shortleafs and longleafs...

In GA, TN, Alabama and parts of VA the pines are mostly slash pines...although they do have all of the other varieties as well (Except for VA).

Im not familiar with cottonwoods, but I wouldnt doubt if East Texas has them.
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Old 04-07-2010, 05:09 PM
 
Location: South Beach and DT Raleigh
7,747 posts, read 8,824,205 times
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Why is it that everytime anyone talks about Southerness, it's always assumed that it's a designation that is only associated with the negative?
"Southerness" as a cultural expression is directly affected by the amount of growth (from outside the region) that a city has experienced. Cities that grow more slowly can probably retain their Southern culture more easily because they have the dominent culture which "overwhelms" and influences their newcomers. Cities with explosive growth probably experience the opposite: newcomers "overwhelming" the local culture.

So, if you were to rank the Southerness of a group of cities, I'd expect that you'd have to carefully look at their growth rates and where that growth was coming from.
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Old 04-07-2010, 06:00 PM
 
Location: America
5,098 posts, read 4,260,573 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by solytaire View Post
That is the yellow poplar range..

As far as pines, you're right..but if Im not mistaken Upper East Texas only Has longleafs and loblollies...while Deep East Texas/southeast Texas contains loblollies, shortleafs and longleafs...

In GA, TN, Alabama and parts of VA the pines are mostly slash pines...although they do have all of the other varieties as well (Except for VA).

Im not familiar with cottonwoods, but I wouldnt doubt if East Texas has them.
yeah i wish those grew here naturally. that's an awesome tree, especially during winter
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