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View Poll Results: Most authentic southern state
Virginia 6 2.78%
North Carolina 7 3.24%
South Carolina 15 6.94%
Georgia 15 6.94%
Florida 4 1.85%
Alabama 39 18.06%
Mississippi 78 36.11%
Louisiana 18 8.33%
Texas 12 5.56%
Arkansas 9 4.17%
Tennessee 10 4.63%
Kentucky 3 1.39%
Voters: 216. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 12-05-2012, 07:25 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
Just depends on how one defines "most Southern." As a native SC'er, if you're looking at only the negative traits--poverty, Civil Rights history, etc.--it's hard to see where parts of SC are "way more Southern" than MS. The most depressed parts would be equal to parts of the Delta, the poorest part of MS.



In terms of Civil Rights history, I consider Alabama and Mississippi to be essentially tied in terms of the negative incidents that occurred in both states; Alabama's just seem to be a little more high profile, especially since Dr. King was deeply involved with segregation efforts there. In Mississippi you had the assassination of Medgar Evers, the murder of Emmett Till, the integration of Ole Miss, and the Mississippi Civil Rights Workers Murders. In terms of present day perceptions, I think what separates Alabama from Mississippi is the fact that it's more urbanized. Mississippi doesn't have an answer for Birmingham, a metro of 1.2 million; Huntsville, which has the highest per capita concentration of engineers in the country; or Mobile, with a large port and huge manufacturing outfits (ThyssenKrupp, Airbus). Alabama also appears to get more recreational tourism with its beaches and golf courses.
You make some very good points, but I still think that modern day, aside from Birmingham and maybe the gulf coast, Alabama looks and feels more Southern than Mississippi. Also, Mississippi gets just as much if not more recreational tourism than Alabama does due to its Gulf Coast and due to casinos all throughout the state, from Tunica in North Mississippi all the way down to the ones on the Gulf Coast in Biloxi. I will give you the bolder part of your statement, though. Ole Miss is STILL a very racist school which at times feels like it's still not integrated, even though people in Mississippi really don't like to admit that about their most famous university.
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Old 12-05-2012, 07:32 PM
 
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Originally Posted by ShaunJuan View Post
You make some very good points, but I still think that modern day, aside from Birmingham and maybe the gulf coast, Alabama looks and feels more Southern than Mississippi.
Don't know if I can buy that. And don't forget Huntsville which might be pound-for-pound the "least Southern" place between both states with a highly educated population and a significant amount of high-paying jobs. Everything about Mississippi strikes me as quintessentially Southern. The "least Southern" part of Mississippi, if I had to guess, would be the Memphis 'burbs, but that's not saying much since Memphis is one of the most Southern midsized cities in the South.

Quote:
Also, Mississippi gets just as much if not more recreational tourism than Alabama does due to its Gulf Coast and due to casinos all throughout the state, from Tunica in North Mississippi all the way down to the ones on the Gulf Coast in Biloxi.
I forgot about the casinos; you're right about that, so tourism might be more or less of a draw.
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Old 12-05-2012, 07:38 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
Don't know if I can buy that. And don't forget Huntsville which might be pound-for-pound the "least Southern" place between both states with a highly educated population and a significant amount of high-paying jobs. Everything about Mississippi strikes me as quintessentially Southern. The "least Southern" part of Mississippi, if I had to guess, would be the Memphis 'burbs, but that's not saying much since Memphis is one of the most Southern midsized cities in the South.
Huntsville doesn't have anything on Oxford, Mississippi as far as educated residents. In fact, half the people in Oxford are retired professionals from the Northeast and other Northern areas, and half the professors at Ole Miss are from up North or out West. The only thing that reminds you that Oxford is even in Mississippi is the fact that racist Ole Miss is there, so I just might have to give it to Huntsville for that reason, but only because of that.
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Old 12-05-2012, 07:42 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
Don't know if I can buy that. And don't forget Huntsville which might be pound-for-pound the "least Southern" place between both states with a highly educated population and a significant amount of high-paying jobs. Everything about Mississippi strikes me as quintessentially Southern. The "least Southern" part of Mississippi, if I had to guess, would be the Memphis 'burbs, but that's not saying much since Memphis is one of the most Southern midsized cities in the South.
MAN, you ain't lying about Memphis!!! It's my hometown, but once it started feeling like a 1964 time warp and started to let North Mississippi influence it more than it influenced North Mississippi, I just HAD to get the heck out of there!!! LOL!
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Old 12-05-2012, 07:52 PM
 
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Originally Posted by ShaunJuan View Post
Huntsville doesn't have anything on Oxford, Mississippi as far as educated residents. In fact, half the people in Oxford are retired professionals from the Northeast and other Northern areas, and half the professors at Ole Miss are from up North or out West. The only thing that reminds you that Oxford is even in Mississippi is the fact that racist Ole Miss is there, so I just might have to give it to Huntsville for that reason, but only because of that.
But Huntsville isn't a traditional college town, so the dynamic is different. Like I mentioned earlier, it has the largest per capita concentration of engineers in the country, thanks to the presence of NASA and Cummings Research Park. The city actually has real industry which has created its highly educated population.

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Originally Posted by ShaunJuan View Post
MAN, you ain't lying about Memphis!!! It's my hometown, but once it started feeling like a 1964 time warp and started to let North Mississippi influence it more than it influenced North Mississippi, I just HAD to get the heck out of there!!! LOL!
Well they don't call Memphis the capital of the Mississippi Delta for nothin'!
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Old 12-05-2012, 10:01 PM
 
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Originally Posted by ShaunJuan View Post
I'm was born and raised in Memphis, which is literally two minutes away from Mississippi, and I have also lived in East Texas. I definitely say East Texas has a more Deep South feel than Mississippi. The Southern accents are even 10x thicker. First time in my life I couldn't understand what a Southerner was saying due to their accent was in East Texas, and I'm a Southerner myself.

I also saw 10x more Confederate Flags throughout East Texas than I've ever seen anywhere in the entire state of Mississippi, too. In a lot of parts of DEEP East Texas, you see the Confederate flag just as much as you see the Texas state flag, and that's saying something. I'n fact, at times, seeing the Texas state flag waving somewhere or a Texas state trooper drive by was the only thing that reminded me that I was in Texas and not in the middle of rural Southern Mississippi or rural Alabama when I lived in East Texas.
East Texas is too close to the Western Edges of the South to be more culturally "deep south" than Mississippi, which is a state in the heart of Dixie. Drive just 2hrs West of East Texas and you're out of the Deep South and in the Western edge of South.
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Old 12-05-2012, 10:46 PM
 
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Originally Posted by polo89 View Post
East Texas is too close to the Western Edges of the South to be more culturally "deep south" than Mississippi, which is a state in the heart of Dixie. Drive just 2hrs West of East Texas and you're out of the Deep South and in the Western edge of South.
Not saying you are, but when you use terms like "the Heart of Dixie," it makes it sound like you're forming your opinions based off stereotypes and media perception rather than experience.

Also, much of your argument seems too heavily based on geography alone. CULTURE is the biggest determining factor, not just where a city or state is located on a map.

That's why Dallas, TX is unmistakably a Southern city, but if you drive just 30 minutes west into Fort Worth, you start to see and feel more traditional Texas and western influences and you feel like you've officially left the South and entered the West; it's why Oxford, Mississippi---a town that caters to college students and retirees from the Northeast, Midwest, and other non-Southern areas---feels more like a quaint little New England town with Southern weather as opposed to a town in Mississippi. It's why North Florida and the Panhandle feel and look like an extension of Alabama and Georgia, but as soon as you hit the Orlando/Central Florida area, and DEFINITELY South Florida, there's not much Southern about Florida at all, and you feel much more like you are in Puerto Rico or Southern California than in the traditional American South, even though it's at the very bottom of the map. And there are plenty more examples/exceptions where those come from.

Come to think of it, I don't even know why Texas and Florida even get included in polls about "Southern states" other than the fact that the person who starts the polls just lumps them in there because of where they are located geographically on the map.
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Old 12-06-2012, 01:07 AM
 
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Originally Posted by ShaunJuan View Post
Come to think of it, I don't even know why Texas and Florida even get included in polls about "Southern states" other than the fact that the person who starts the polls just lumps them in there because of where they are located geographically on the map.
Georgraphy, but also history plays a role. And with the rapid urbanization of many locales in the South, we're going to have to start redefining what it means to be Southern because kicking out every area that gets overwhelmed with Northerners and Hispanics is getting to be quite tiresome.
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Old 12-06-2012, 04:55 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
Georgraphy, but also history plays a role. And with the rapid urbanization of many locales in the South, we're going to have to start redefining what it means to be Southern because kicking out every area that gets overwhelmed with Northerners and Hispanics is getting to be quite tiresome.
I understand history CAN play a role, but how the culture in a place was 50 or more years ago as opposed to how it is today plays an even bigger role; Missouri was one of the most notorious slave states, but most people would agree that it's not a "Southern" state today, especially not culturally, and "Northerners and Hispanics" really don't have anything to do with that.

Aside from Texas and Florida, the Southern culture and tradition still remains and always wil remain strong all throughout most of the states in this poll, no matter how many Northerners and Hispanics move there.
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Old 12-06-2012, 06:56 AM
 
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Originally Posted by ShaunJuan View Post
Not saying you are, but when you use terms like "the Heart of Dixie," it makes it sound like you're forming your opinions based off stereotypes and media perception rather than experience.

Also, much of your argument seems too heavily based on geography alone. CULTURE is the biggest determining factor, not just where a city or state is located on a map.

That's why Dallas, TX is unmistakably a Southern city, but if you drive just 30 minutes west into Fort Worth, you start to see and feel more traditional Texas and western influences and you feel like you've officially left the South and entered the West; it's why Oxford, Mississippi---a town that caters to college students and retirees from the Northeast, Midwest, and other non-Southern areas---feels more like a quaint little New England town with Southern weather as opposed to a town in Mississippi. It's why North Florida and the Panhandle feel and look like an extension of Alabama and Georgia, but as soon as you hit the Orlando/Central Florida area, and DEFINITELY South Florida, there's not much Southern about Florida at all, and you feel much more like you are in Puerto Rico or Southern California than in the traditional American South, even though it's at the very bottom of the map. And there are plenty more examples/exceptions where those come from.

Come to think of it, I don't even know why Texas and Florida even get included in polls about "Southern states" other than the fact that the person who starts the polls just lumps them in there because of where they are located geographically on the map.
Geography, history, etc is why I referred to Mississippi as the heart of Dixie. They still have a Confederate flag on their state flag. That is a state filled with PROUD Southerners, a little more so than East Texas. And I've actually been to Mississippi(from Texas). It's pretty Southern.
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