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View Poll Results: Most authentic southern state
Virginia 6 2.78%
North Carolina 7 3.24%
South Carolina 15 6.94%
Georgia 15 6.94%
Florida 4 1.85%
Alabama 39 18.06%
Mississippi 78 36.11%
Louisiana 18 8.33%
Texas 12 5.56%
Arkansas 9 4.17%
Tennessee 10 4.63%
Kentucky 3 1.39%
Voters: 216. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 05-18-2013, 11:06 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nairobi View Post
Well, I never said it was the Mid-Atlantic, but the influence is certainly there, which why I don't think it's accurate to claim that NC could somehow be the most authentic southern state.

I've heard North Carolinans that speak with an accent that sounds more East Coast than southern.
I've heard these accents somewhere near the coast. But once again, those accents don't negate Southerness. There are MANY accents of the South that don't sound like what is viewed as stereotypically Southern. I know you've heard the NO Yat accent. And besides, those NC accents that you refer to are very minimal. You really need to visit NC.
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Old 05-18-2013, 11:19 AM
 
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Originally Posted by sonofaque86 View Post
Go 20 miles outside of charlotte and Raleigh and tell me if that's mostly true
Charlottes suburbs are Southern through-and-through. The city of Charlotte it's self is Southern through-and-through. Bojangles, Nascar, Billy Graham, Carolina BBQ, and these guys:


The BBQ Song - Rhett & Link - YouTube
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Old 05-18-2013, 11:24 AM
 
Location: The Magnolia City
8,931 posts, read 11,330,600 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by polo89 View Post
I've heard these accents somewhere near the coast. But once again, those accents don't negate Southerness. There are MANY accents of the South that don't sound like what is viewed as stereotypically Southern. I know you've heard the NO Yat accent. And besides, those NC accents that you refer to are very minimal. You really need to visit NC.
First off, let's not start our discussion by telling me what I need to do. I have been to North Carolina before, and my opinions are based off of my experiences there, just like everyone else here.

On the other hand, I've asked who here has considerable familiarity with central southern states like Louisiana and Mississippi. I haven't got an answer yet. I only ask because I'm wondering if anyone else here is able to make the same distinction between things like language and other cultural attributes that I am.

My only points are as follows:
1. North Carolina isn't the most authentic southern state
2. Southeastern NC is the only part of the state I'll possibly consider to be part of the Deep South

I never said North Carolina wasn't southern

As for the accents, it's not the same situation as the New Orleans accent, which developed exclusively. Those accents in NC seem to be part of a stream of speech patterns that continue north into the Northeast.
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Old 05-18-2013, 11:52 AM
 
14,006 posts, read 21,971,663 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nairobi View Post
First off, let's not start our discussion by telling me what I need to do. I have been to North Carolina before, and my opinions are based off of my experiences there, just like everyone else here.

On the other hand, I've asked who here has considerable familiarity with central southern states like Louisiana and Mississippi. I haven't got an answer yet. I only ask because I'm wondering if anyone else here is able to make the same distinction between things like language and other cultural attributes that I am.

My only points are as follows:
1. North Carolina isn't the most authentic southern state
2. Southeastern NC is the only part of the state I'll possibly consider to be part of the Deep South

I never said North Carolina wasn't southern

As for the accents, it's not the same situation as the New Orleans accent, which developed exclusively. Those accents in NC seem to be part of a stream of speech patterns that continue north into the Northeast.
Those accents are very minimal in the state overall. The areas of NC that those accents predominate, are some of the least populated areas of the state. Eastern NC, near the coast. The predominate NC accent sounds similar to that of folks in SC, GA, etc. It's kinda similar to the "Texas Southerness is negated by El Paso" argument. El Paso is a waaay out there fringe city, and we know it doesn't negate how Southern east-texas is. Same with NC. Now, VA has alot more of that coastal NC accent. I knew folks, TRUE Virginians who sound like New Yorkers. It was weird, but it made sense. NC overall, may not be the deep South, but Charlotte and other areas of South-Central NC are too close to SC to not be associated with the Deep South at least a little bit. Most Charlotteans visit Myrtle Beach, and Charelston for there coastal fun(well, when they don't go to the Outer Banks). My bad for telling you what you should do. I think NC is where the Deep South and Appalachians meet.
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Old 05-18-2013, 12:06 PM
 
Location: The Magnolia City
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Quote:
Originally Posted by polo89 View Post
Those accents are very minimal in the state overall. The areas of NC that those accents predominate, are some of the least populated areas of the state. Eastern NC, near the coast. The predominate NC accent sounds similar to that of folks in SC, GA, etc. It's kinda similar to the "Texas Southerness is negated by El Paso" argument. El Paso is a waaay out there fringe city, and we know it doesn't negate how Southern east-texas is. Same with NC. Now, VA has alot more of that coastal NC accent. I knew folks, TRUE Virginians who sound like New Yorkers. It was weird, but it made sense. NC overall, may not be the deep South, but Charlotte and other areas of South-Central NC are too close to SC to not be associated with the Deep South at least a little bit. Most Charlotteans visit Myrtle Beach, and Charelston for there coastal fun(well, when they don't go to the Outer Banks). My bad for telling you what you should do. I think NC is where the Deep South and Appalachians meet.
And you and I both know that it wouldn't make sense for someone to claim that Texas could somehow be the most "authentically" southern state. Why? Because there are other influences and parts of the state that aren't very southern at all. That's all I'm saying about NC. It's not about negating the southernness of a completely different area of the state. I never said anything to suggest that.
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Old 05-18-2013, 12:24 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nairobi View Post
2. Southeastern NC is the only part of the state I'll possibly consider to be part of the Deep South
I'm curious as to the differences you observed between southeastern NC and the rest of eastern NC that excludes the latter from consideration as Deep South. Even within NC, southeastern NC isn't really recognized as a distinct region but is grouped in with the rest of eastern NC. Now you have the Sandhills region in the southeastern part of the state, but that's just a distinction based on one specific geographic feature (the sandhills, remnants of an ancient shoreline near the fall line) and not culture, demographics, etc.
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Old 05-18-2013, 02:07 PM
 
Location: MD suburbs of DC
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The only argument for NC not being Southern is that young people from urban or suburban North Carolina are losing their Southern accent quickly, unlike those in the Deep South who tend to keep their accents (at least in the suburbs, not sure about the inner-city regions). Otherwise, North Carolina is just as Southern as Tennessee and Arkansas. Not Deep Southern (save for Wilmington), and not the most authentic Southern state, but to say any part of it doesn't feel Southern is an overstatement. The Triangle is Southern-lite, but Southern nonetheless - compare with Kentucky and Virginia (excluding NoVA which feels very Mid-Atlantic).

Again, Mississippi and Alabama definitely give off a very strong Southern vibe. Accents, food, demographics, climate, everything.
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Old 05-18-2013, 03:37 PM
 
Location: NC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by David_J View Post
The only argument for NC not being Southern is that young people from urban or suburban North Carolina are losing their Southern accent quickly, unlike those in the Deep South who tend to keep their accents (at least in the suburbs, not sure about the inner-city regions). Otherwise, North Carolina is just as Southern as Tennessee and Arkansas. Not Deep Southern (save for Wilmington), and not the most authentic Southern state, but to say any part of it doesn't feel Southern is an overstatement. The Triangle is Southern-lite, but Southern nonetheless - compare with Kentucky and Virginia (excluding NoVA which feels very Mid-Atlantic).

Again, Mississippi and Alabama definitely give off a very strong Southern vibe. Accents, food, demographics, climate, everything.
I think with the invention of cell phones, Skype, the Internet, and globalization with people my generation and younger.....i used to watch the mickey house club when Justin timber lake and Britney Spears, etc and saved by the bell, etc in the 90s and never heard a lot of different accents on TV and in my schools.......accents will not be the same as they have always been. I'm from Columbia sc and 27 and have a neutral accent. Could I act and put on a southern accent? Yes. But to tell you the truth, kids these days aren't shut out from the rest of the world in the south when it comes to technology etc, so I don't know if I'm getting my point across.....but there are a lot of people in sc who don't think I'm from sc. (My parents came down from NY a couple of years before I was born (which is another reason I don't have the accent) but I am 100% southern without an accent. Sorry folks....
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Old 05-18-2013, 07:40 PM
 
Location: The Magnolia City
8,931 posts, read 11,330,600 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by David_J View Post
The only argument for NC not being Southern is that young people from urban or suburban North Carolina are losing their Southern accent quickly, unlike those in the Deep South who tend to keep their accents (at least in the suburbs, not sure about the inner-city regions). Otherwise, North Carolina is just as Southern as Tennessee and Arkansas. Not Deep Southern (save for Wilmington), and not the most authentic Southern state, but to say any part of it doesn't feel Southern is an overstatement. The Triangle is Southern-lite, but Southern nonetheless - compare with Kentucky and Virginia (excluding NoVA which feels very Mid-Atlantic).

Again, Mississippi and Alabama definitely give off a very strong Southern vibe. Accents, food, demographics, climate, everything.
I think Tennessee and Arkansas are considerably more southern; especially Southeast Arkansas and West Tennessee. You can't really beat the Delta South.
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Old 05-19-2013, 10:44 AM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
18,228 posts, read 25,925,308 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sonofaque86 View Post
Go 20 miles outside of charlotte and Raleigh and tell me if that's mostly true
Which is hilarious IMO. No way is Texas close to Georgia in being the most authentically Southern. Not when Texas has cities like El Paso, Laredo, and Brownsville. Even Central Texas like Austin to Marble Dallas is miles different from Albany or Augusta in terms of a Southern feel.
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