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View Poll Results: Which city is better?
Dallas 124 48.82%
Atlanta 130 51.18%
Voters: 254. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 01-12-2010, 02:46 PM
 
Location: Dallas-Fort Worth Metroplex
3,261 posts, read 7,638,611 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jluke65780 View Post
Who cares. Neither one has bigger hills than Houston.
HA! HA! HA!..........Very funny!

 
Old 01-12-2010, 02:53 PM
 
2,531 posts, read 5,326,947 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jluke65780 View Post
Who cares. Neither one has bigger hills than Houston.

The only big "hills" I've seen in Houston were on the chests of beautiful women walking in the Galleria, LOL.
 
Old 01-12-2010, 02:56 PM
 
Location: Dallas-Fort Worth Metroplex
3,261 posts, read 7,638,611 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by grindin View Post
The only big "hills" I've seen in Houston were on the chests of beautiful women walking in the Galleria, LOL.
Very Funny!
 
Old 01-12-2010, 02:58 PM
 
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Who has those pictures of the Cedar Hill area by Joe Pool Lake? Those were some pretty verdant pictures of the Dallas area.

That being said, the trees are taller and more abundant in Atlanta. Most of the trees I've seen in Dallas are along the creekbeds or in older established neighborhoods. I remember seeing old pictures of Plano from the 1970's and 80's when the city was beginning to grow and the trees were much shorter back then. A look at the neighborhoods today would have much taller trees.

If I were to move to the DFW area, I'd pick an older, more established area where there are taller trees.

Here is a neighborhood in Cedar Hill. Are those radio/TV towers in the background? I think that is one of the higher elevations in the Metroplex:

http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&ll=3...233.81,,0,3.74


Kessler Park, Dallas:

http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&ll=3...,60.08,,0,3.46

McKinney, a suburb about 25-30 miles outside DT Dallas:

http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&ll=3...133.15,,0,2.06

Frisco, or as some of the folks over in the Dallas boards call it, the "Tundra", LOL:

http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&ll=3...28.59,,0,-1.72

Here is an older, more established part of Arlington:

http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&ll=3...,17.03,,0,8.22

This looks like a much newer part of Arlington:

http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&ll=3...=12,80.35,,0,5

Last edited by grindin; 01-12-2010 at 03:10 PM..
 
Old 01-12-2010, 03:01 PM
 
Location: Dallas-Fort Worth Metroplex
3,261 posts, read 7,638,611 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by grindin View Post
Who has those pictures of the Cedar Hill area by Joe Pool Lake? Those were some pretty verdant pictures of the Dallas area.

That being said, the trees are taller and more abundant in Atlanta. Most of the trees I've seen in Dallas are along the creekbeds. If I were to move to the area, I'd pick an older, more established area where there are taller trees.
Have you ever seen The Great Trinity Forest in Dallas!?!
 
Old 01-12-2010, 03:01 PM
 
4,228 posts, read 4,124,677 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jluke65780 View Post
Wait; so the majority of Atlanta's suburban houses are on small lots like Dallas and Houston?? Is that what your saying??
that the thing not all of Dallas suburban houses or even houses in Dallas itself are on small lots of land it vary from neighborhood to neighborhood It largely depends on how Wealthy the neighborhood is just like Metro Atlanta. Some Atlanta suburbs like Alpharetta and part of Marrietta are very affluent thus the land lots are bigger but most of Atlanta's suburban houses are on small lots like Dallas yes.
 
Old 01-12-2010, 03:03 PM
 
Location: Dallas-Fort Worth Metroplex
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chiatldal View Post
that the thing not all of Dallas suburban houses or even houses in Dallas itself are on small lots of land it vary from neighborhood to neighborhood It largely depends on how Wealthy the neighborhood is just like Metro Atlanta. Some Atlanta suburbs like Alpharetta and part of Marrietta are very affluent thus the land lots are bigger but most of Atlanta's suburban houses are on small lots like Dallas yes.
Thanks for clearing that up!
 
Old 01-12-2010, 03:06 PM
 
Location: Willowbend/Houston
13,403 posts, read 20,318,137 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chiatldal View Post
that the thing not all of Dallas suburban houses or even houses in Dallas itself are on small lots of land it vary from neighborhood to neighborhood It largely depends on how Wealthy the neighborhood is just like Metro Atlanta. Some Atlanta suburbs like Alpharetta and part of Marrietta are very affluent thus the land lots are bigger but most of Atlanta's suburban houses are on small lots like Dallas yes.
I dont know any suburbs immediately around Dallas that can match Alpharetta or Marrietta for spreadoutness. Even affluent sububrs like Plano and Frisco have houses that are on smaller lots. The only one I can think of is Southlake.
 
Old 01-12-2010, 03:09 PM
 
7,848 posts, read 17,822,912 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LAnative10 View Post
I dont know any suburbs immediately around Dallas that can match Alpharetta or Marrietta for spreadoutness. Even affluent sububrs like Plano and Frisco have houses that are on smaller lots. The only one I can think of is Southlake.
But I have to agree that you can't really generalize about an entire metro based on those observations. You mention 4 suburbs of these two cities out of literally hundreds.
 
Old 01-12-2010, 03:18 PM
 
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I've also noticed that the transition from Rural to Urban is much more pronounced in DFW than it is in Atlanta. Well, actually along Interstate 20. I can't speak for I-35 coming in from Oklahoma though. But along I-20 from Weatherford to Ft. Worth, there is some gap in development, and then, BAM!!!, Ft. Worth hits you upside the head.

Heading in from the East, where yes, there are more towns, but going from Terrell to Forney to Mesquite, it seems there are a ton of gaps in development before Dallas whacks you upside the head. When I drive on I-20 through Carrollton and Villa Rica on my way into Atlanta, or through Covington to the east, it feels exurban, but still rural, and the suburbs just seem to gradually come on in or peter out depending on the direction you're going.

It could be perception, it could be how sparsely populated the west is compared to the east, just merely an observation. *shrugs*

The transition from "nowhere" to urban in Dallas/Ft. Worth isn't as stark as it is coming in from say, I-75 into South Florida or I-10 into New Orleans.
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