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View Poll Results: What is the landocked major city in America?
Atlanta 14 11.38%
Dallas 15 12.20%
Phoenix 16 13.01%
Las Vegas 7 5.69%
Denver 63 51.22%
Fresno 1 0.81%
Salt Lake City 4 3.25%
San Bernadino 1 0.81%
Tallahassee 0 0%
Charlotte 2 1.63%
Voters: 123. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 01-17-2010, 03:42 PM
 
Location: Greeley, Colorado
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Denver. No contest. Denver has only 2 small rivers and aside from a few man-made lakes (all very minute in size) there's nothing. Anyone consider WHY Colorado is the SECOND most arid state in the Union and has water issues?
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Old 01-17-2010, 06:52 PM
 
Location: Tampa - St. Louis
1,029 posts, read 1,534,175 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MassVt View Post
If we're talking about distance from oceans, then perhaps Kansas City, and then St. Louis. Denver would be prominently mentioned, as well. But if we're going to include lakes (Great Salt Lake, Great Lakes), rivers, etc, then it's a pretty difficult task, probably impossible.
St. Louis? Its at the convergence of America's two largest rivers and less than 300 miles away from Lake Michigan (which it connects to through the Illinois river all the way up to Chicago). St. Louis is far from locked in, its one of America's largest river ports and was instrumental in the growth of early American commerce westward.
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Old 01-17-2010, 07:13 PM
 
11,016 posts, read 21,581,008 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Beavercreek33 View Post
What about Omaha?
Omaha is located on the one the largest rivers in the country.
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Old 01-17-2010, 08:35 PM
 
Location: Metro Atlanta & Savannah, GA - Corpus Christi, TX
4,347 posts, read 6,933,304 times
Reputation: 2040
If we're talking about landlocked as far as having a body of water inhibit growth, Denver would be the farthest major city from any problems like that.

If we're talking about being landlocked and not being able to expand city's borders in general for any reason, I'd vote for Miami. The Everglades to the west and south, Miami Beach & the Atlantic to the east, Fort Lauderdale & Broward County to the north.
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Old 02-13-2010, 04:35 PM
 
Location: The Lakes
2,372 posts, read 4,329,829 times
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Indianapolis, hands down.
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Old 02-13-2010, 04:39 PM
 
1,694 posts, read 4,954,993 times
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Indianapolis is 150 miles from the Great Lakes..
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Old 02-13-2010, 09:15 PM
 
Location: Ventura County, Ca
133 posts, read 582,625 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Guardian of The Gulf View Post
Counting, rivers, lakes, any of other body of water. What is the most landlocked major city in the U.S in your opinon? Not counting metro areas, just city limits, and you can say a city not on the list.
I interpreted the question to include all natural bodies of water. Based on that, I don't think Denver or Indianapolis are the most landlocked because they each have rivers within their cities, even if they're not major rivers. In my opinion, Las Vegas is it. And if you're wondering about Lake Mead, it's not in the city.
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Old 02-13-2010, 09:23 PM
 
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as others have said, it is Denver. No major rivers, no major lakes, and the furthest major city from oceans. No brainer.
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Old 02-13-2010, 09:56 PM
 
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How did Salt Lake city, the only city on here named after a body of water, make the list.
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Old 02-13-2010, 10:25 PM
 
3,971 posts, read 11,442,665 times
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Perhaps because most in the U.S. don't appreciate the size of the Great Salt Lake. It effects the weather of much of the SLC metro area with lake effect snow during the winter, and increases humidity and rainfall during the warm season.
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