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Old 01-21-2010, 02:10 AM
 
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Ive never been to South America, and I'm wondering how (on the whole) American cities compare with South American Cities.

Im talking in terms of urbanity, walkability, nightlife, streetscape, etc. Cities like Sao Paulo, Rio de Janiero, Buenos Aires, Lima, Santiago?

How do they stack up to the typical American city?
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Old 01-21-2010, 07:06 AM
 
Location: Zurich, Switzerland/ Piedmont, CA
32,322 posts, read 55,131,075 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AcroJimmy2 View Post
Ive never been to South America, and I'm wondering how (on the whole) American cities compare with South American Cities.

Im talking in terms of urbanity, walkability, nightlife, streetscape, etc. Cities like Sao Paulo, Rio de Janiero, Buenos Aires, Lima, Santiago?

How do they stack up to the typical American city?
As far as walkability, nightlife and streetscape, typical Latin American cities far exceed typical American cities.

Every city in Latin America(and I've been to them all) I've been to has a very vibrant downtown.

Even podunk towns in the middle of nowhere have lots of pedestrian activity in the downtown.
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Old 01-21-2010, 05:29 PM
 
594 posts, read 1,536,488 times
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Originally Posted by 18Montclair View Post
As far as walkability, nightlife and streetscape, typical Latin American cities far exceed typical American cities.

Every city in Latin America(and I've been to them all) I've been to has a very vibrant downtown.

Even podunk towns in the middle of nowhere have lots of pedestrian activity in the downtown.
Interesting, as both were developed around the same time...

I guess in the US we just emphasized car-oriented development that much more!
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Old 01-21-2010, 07:32 PM
 
Location: 30-40N 90-100W
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I think I read somewhere that Brasilia is the least pedestrian-friendly city in the world. (Granted I've learned "walkable" doesn't really have that much to do with walking. It's more a statement that seems to mean "car-less" or "scrunched together", which appears to be how you use it as well but is still a bit confusing to me. To me "walkable" really should be a statement about walking and being a pedestrian, but then again I'm a small-town guy.)

South America is an entire continent so I'm not really sure there is some South American template American cities can be compared to. I'd assume Brazilian cities are a good deal different than those in Ecuador and that cities in Guyana are quite different than those in Paraguay. The US is generally better developed than South America with less poverty and in some cases less crime. However if you're wanting to think more in terms of "not into cars, has good nightlife" I'd imagine many South American cities would come out better than many of ours. Although I think some of the Northeast is fairly dense and into parties. New England has lots of drinkers and California has wine country.
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Old 01-21-2010, 07:57 PM
 
Location: Midwest
1,005 posts, read 2,449,054 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AcroJimmy2 View Post
Ive never been to South America, and I'm wondering how (on the whole) American cities compare with South American Cities.

Im talking in terms of urbanity, walkability, nightlife, streetscape, etc. Cities like Sao Paulo, Rio de Janiero, Buenos Aires, Lima, Santiago?

How do they stack up to the typical American city?
Interesting question
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Old 01-22-2010, 06:45 AM
 
13,566 posts, read 22,018,249 times
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Originally Posted by Thomas R. View Post
I think I read somewhere that Brasilia is the least pedestrian-friendly city in the world. (Granted I've learned "walkable" doesn't really have that much to do with walking. It's more a statement that seems to mean "car-less" or "scrunched together", which appears to be how you use it as well but is still a bit confusing to me. To me "walkable" really should be a statement about walking and being a pedestrian, but then again I'm a small-town guy.)

South America is an entire continent so I'm not really sure there is some South American template American cities can be compared to. I'd assume Brazilian cities are a good deal different than those in Ecuador and that cities in Guyana are quite different than those in Paraguay. The US is generally better developed than South America with less poverty and in some cases less crime. However if you're wanting to think more in terms of "not into cars, has good nightlife" I'd imagine many South American cities would come out better than many of ours. Although I think some of the Northeast is fairly dense and into parties. New England has lots of drinkers and California has wine country.
Actually, Brasilia is more walkable than most U.S. cities. It's just that "connectivity" across the whole city is the problem.

But on a day-to-day/daily life basis--very walkable, no need for a car (unless one lives in Lago Sul or Lago Norte).
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Old 01-22-2010, 06:46 AM
 
13,566 posts, read 22,018,249 times
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Originally Posted by 18Montclair View Post
As far as walkability, nightlife and streetscape, typical Latin American cities far exceed typical American cities.

Every city in Latin America(and I've been to them all) I've been to has a very vibrant downtown.

Even podunk towns in the middle of nowhere have lots of pedestrian activity in the downtown.
Agreed.
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Old 01-22-2010, 06:54 AM
 
Location: Willowbend/Houston
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Sao Paulo and Buenos Aires are probably some of the most walkable cities in the world. There are some cities that arent as walkable. I didnt find Medellin or San Pedro Sula very walkable.
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Old 01-22-2010, 05:02 PM
 
Location: 30-40N 90-100W
13,856 posts, read 22,955,873 times
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Originally Posted by aries4118 View Post
Actually, Brasilia is more walkable than most U.S. cities. It's just that "connectivity" across the whole city is the problem.

But on a day-to-day/daily life basis--very walkable, no need for a car (unless one lives in Lago Sul or Lago Norte).
I think it's original design wasn't, but I had heard it changed.

Also I have become aware "walkable" means something different than what I thought it meant. It's mostly about not needing a car. When I first came I was thinking "walkable" had something to do with the safety and ease of walking, but it apparently has little or nothing to do with that. I guess I'll try to use "pedestrian friendly" when thinking of what I mean.
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Old 01-22-2010, 05:32 PM
 
Location: Zurich, Switzerland/ Piedmont, CA
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Although I will admit, South America has fallen into a frenzy of mall-building that you see everywhere. And this will, if it hasnt already happened, take a lot of energy out of traditional downtown retail, such as it has done in the US.
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