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Old 11-16-2016, 10:54 AM
 
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Many of the post-industrial cities still have a very palpable blue collar feel, even if they are mostly white collar these days.
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Old 11-16-2016, 10:59 AM
 
Location: Norfolk, VA
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Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
Many of the post-industrial cities still have a very palpable blue collar feel, even if they are mostly white collar these days.
Case in point. They have a "blue collar feel" because they're transition, and they haven't mastered the finer points of being a White Collar city. They also have a different feel because the people aren't as bourgeois, uppity, and high minded, sophisticated nor as cosmopolitan as what you'll find in traditional White collar cities. When cities like New York have a 100 year head start on being White Collar over your city, your city is going to feel different, even if it is more White collar now, than it was 20 or 30 years ago.

Plus people are nicer, down to earth, and not as misanthropic as those you'll find in some of these White collar cities.
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Old 11-16-2016, 11:03 AM
 
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Originally Posted by goofy328 View Post
Case in point. They have a "blue collar feel" because they're transition, and they haven't mastered the finer points of being a White Collar city. They also have a different feel because the people aren't as bourgeois, uppity, and high minded, sophisticated nor as cosmopolitan as what you'll find in traditional White collar cities. When cities like New York have a 100 year head start on being White Collar over your city, your city is going to feel different, even if it is more White collar now, than it was 20 or 30 years ago.

Plus people are nicer, down to earth, and not as misanthropic as those you'll find in some of these White collar cities.
NYC has a very significant history of heavy industry and even today still has lots of industrial areas, so I'm not sure if that's the right example to use.

Boston is a good example of a city that feels a lot more white collar than blue collar today despite an industrial past.
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Old 11-16-2016, 11:31 AM
 
Location: Norfolk, VA
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Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
NYC has a very significant history of heavy industry and even today still has lots of industrial areas, so I'm not sure if that's the right example to use.

Boston is a good example of a city that feels a lot more white collar than blue collar today despite an industrial past.
I think this has been mentioned before with respect to the sustainability of the art scene in Detroit, and the differences with trying to make it as an artist in that town, where you do not have the benefit of rich benefactors purchasing and acting as patrons of the art, and how things are in New York, where artists can benefit from all of the wealth that is thrown at the arts if they can position themselves right in the city, as there are still thousands of artists struggling hand to mouth in the city.

It isn't that cities like Detroit or Cleveland are entirely devoid of any White collar presence. These cities have always been a microcosm of what exists in the larger coast cities. And cities like Philadelphia and Pittsburgh have always had great universities. Same with Chicago and Columbus. But an individual has to be in the right position to partake of the White collar scene in these cities, and the average resident is not.

So even though you have all of this "White collar" stuff going on around you, one can still move about on the hard working, "Blue collar" aesthetic, because that's how they were raised. A lot of new "White collar" in the Midwestern cities and a lot of "first generation" White collar going on. You don't have the same institutions that cities like Boston and NYC have. Small pockets here and there, which is what you'll get in a city like Cincinnati or Pittsburgh, isn't the same as what you have in NYC and Boston.

A good example is Hampton Roads. Not everyone there is working class. But there aren't enough rich, or wealthy, individuals around to change the look and feel of the area. And of those that are, not all of them are into the same things their counterparts in cities like NYC or LA are into. What goes on there is typical of what the scene is like in a lot of Midwestern cities.
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Old 11-16-2016, 12:10 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
NYC has a very significant history of heavy industry and even today still has lots of industrial areas, so I'm not sure if that's the right example to use.

Boston is a good example of a city that feels a lot more white collar than blue collar today despite an industrial past.
I would argue that Boston (especially if we're including the metro) is far more blue collar than its image. Boston is probably more like Philly than DC or SF when it comes to being blue collar.
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Old 11-16-2016, 12:30 PM
 
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Originally Posted by gladhands View Post
I would argue that Boston (especially if we're including the metro) is far more blue collar than its image. Boston is probably more like Philly than DC or SF when it comes to being blue collar.
Boston certainly doesn't feel anywhere near as blue collar as Philly, at least in my experience. But almost everywhere feels more blue collar than DC lol.
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Old 11-16-2016, 12:46 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
Boston certainly doesn't feel anywhere near as blue collar as Philly, at least in my experience. But almost everywhere feels more blue collar than DC lol.
I'd say the following neighborhoods are still heavily blue collar:

Dorchester
East Boston
Hyde Park
Mattapan
Roslindale
Roxbury
Southie*
West Roxbury

And, for the record, I think it's a good thing. Cities should have socioeconomic diversity.



*yes, I know about Southie's gentrification but high home ownership rates among the neighborhood's working-class population and actual housing projects mean that the neighborhood's poor and working class aren't going anywhere. Those same people who rioted when schools were integrated still live there. So do their kids.
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Old 11-16-2016, 02:18 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gladhands View Post
I'd say the following neighborhoods are still heavily blue collar:

Dorchester
East Boston
Hyde Park
Mattapan
Roslindale
Roxbury
Southie*
West Roxbury

And, for the record, I think it's a good thing. Cities should have socioeconomic diversity.



*yes, I know about Southie's gentrification but high home ownership rates among the neighborhood's working-class population and actual housing projects mean that the neighborhood's poor and working class aren't going anywhere. Those same people who rioted when schools were integrated still live there. So do their kids.
You're wayyyyy more familiar with Boston than me, but I can say that Dorchester did feel blue collar-ish but not like, say, West Philly.
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Old 11-16-2016, 06:01 PM
 
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Originally Posted by MrTalk View Post
Philadelphia is more white collar. Eds and meds dominate the economy.

Seriously, Rocky was ****ing 40 years ago folks.
True, as both of those industries are likely the biggest industries in "blue collar" metros(if not many white collar metros as well). An example of this: Onondaga County - Largest Employers

http://www.centerstateceo.com/sites/...ct%20Sheet.pdf (second page)

Then, you have your areas like Rochester NY and Columbus that are in the "Rust Belt" region, but are more white collar than people may realize they are.

Last edited by ckhthankgod; 11-16-2016 at 06:29 PM..
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Old 11-16-2016, 07:49 PM
 
Location: Nashville, TN
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South:
Charlotte - White
Atlanta - White
Raleigh- White
Nashville- White
Louisville- White
Memphis- Blue
New Orleans- Blue
Jacksonville- Blue
Birmingham- Blue
Dallas -White
Houston-White
San Antonio - Blue
Ft. Worth- Blue
Austin - White
Richmond- White
Knoxville- Blue
Little Rock- Blue
Virginia Beach- Blue
Baltimore- White
Washington D.C.-White
Wilmington- Blue
Lexington- Blue
Greenville- White
Chattanooga- Blue
Huntsville- White
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