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Old 02-10-2010, 08:36 AM
 
Location: New Jersey
4,086 posts, read 6,867,154 times
Reputation: 2617

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Does it really matter for southern cities whether the collar is white or blue, since the neck is Red anyway???
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Old 02-10-2010, 09:39 AM
 
Location: Denver
6,623 posts, read 11,055,915 times
Reputation: 3953
Thanks for doing your best to turn a civil thread into a flame war.
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Old 02-10-2010, 10:31 AM
 
2,531 posts, read 4,942,755 times
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If anything, Atlanta is more white collar than blue collar. There was a history of a decent-sized manufacturing base here, but much of the economy here was based on white collar jobs due to the city being HQ to many companies.

Much of the blue collar workforce here has been eroded over time. For example GM and Ford both closed their plants in Atlanta last decade.

People also forget there are other types of "collars" that have evolved over the years.

Gold Collar: People can't seem to make up their mind on what classifies a "Gold Collar" worker though. Some define it as younger, low-wage earners/luxury-seeking buyers. Many of whom work in retail or hospitality jobs. More often than not, they don't attend college. They may have high disposable income if they still live with their parents and/or not paying college tuition bills.

Others define "Gold-Collar" as "High-Skilled/Highly-Variable" workers. These are your computer programmers, stock analysts, community planners, etc. These were traditionally viewed as "white collar" jobs, but have warranted a new classification due to them having highly valuable/specialized skills compared to other white collar workers such as bank tellers, bookkeepers, etc.

Pink-Collar: Traditionally stereotyped as "woman's work". Traditionally, men rarely worked these positions: Teacher, Flight Attendant, Hairdresser, Nurse, Secretary, Receptionist, etc.

Green-Collar: People who specialize in jobs that help with conservation and the environment. Could range from Architects to Solar Panel Designers, etc.

Gray-Collar: Most often thought of as jobs that older people take, but in actuality, could include jobs that combine elements of white and blue-collar jobs. For example, agribusiness, skilled trades, Food prep, protective services, etc. The main difference between blue collar and gray collar jobs is that blue collar workers are often trained on the job, while gray-collar workers may have a degree in a specific skill set. HR and insurance companies typically make this distinction due to liability and potential for injury.
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Old 02-10-2010, 08:28 PM
 
5,231 posts, read 12,518,823 times
Reputation: 2469
Quote:
Originally Posted by grindin View Post
If anything, Atlanta is more white collar than blue collar. There was a history of a decent-sized manufacturing base here, but much of the economy here was based on white collar jobs due to the city being HQ to many companies.

Much of the blue collar workforce here has been eroded over time. For example GM and Ford both closed their plants in Atlanta last decade.

People also forget there are other types of "collars" that have evolved over the years.

Gold Collar: People can't seem to make up their mind on what classifies a "Gold Collar" worker though. Some define it as younger, low-wage earners/luxury-seeking buyers. Many of whom work in retail or hospitality jobs. More often than not, they don't attend college. They may have high disposable income if they still live with their parents and/or not paying college tuition bills.

Others define "Gold-Collar" as "High-Skilled/Highly-Variable" workers. These are your computer programmers, stock analysts, community planners, etc. These were traditionally viewed as "white collar" jobs, but have warranted a new classification due to them having highly valuable/specialized skills compared to other white collar workers such as bank tellers, bookkeepers, etc.

Pink-Collar: Traditionally stereotyped as "woman's work". Traditionally, men rarely worked these positions: Teacher, Flight Attendant, Hairdresser, Nurse, Secretary, Receptionist, etc.

Green-Collar: People who specialize in jobs that help with conservation and the environment. Could range from Architects to Solar Panel Designers, etc.

Gray-Collar: Most often thought of as jobs that older people take, but in actuality, could include jobs that combine elements of white and blue-collar jobs. For example, agribusiness, skilled trades, Food prep, protective services, etc. The main difference between blue collar and gray collar jobs is that blue collar workers are often trained on the job, while gray-collar workers may have a degree in a specific skill set. HR and insurance companies typically make this distinction due to liability and potential for injury.
What are the jobs that older people take? Other than Wal-mart greeter, I can't think of any.
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Old 02-12-2010, 03:30 PM
 
64 posts, read 139,624 times
Reputation: 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by grindin View Post
Gold Collar: People can't seem to make up their mind on what classifies a "Gold Collar" worker though. Some define it as younger, low-wage earners/luxury-seeking buyers. Many of whom work in retail or hospitality jobs. More often than not, they don't attend college. They may have high disposable income if they still live with their parents and/or not paying college tuition bills.

Others define "Gold-Collar" as "High-Skilled/Highly-Variable" workers. These are your computer programmers, stock analysts, community planners, etc. These were traditionally viewed as "white collar" jobs, but have warranted a new classification due to them having highly valuable/specialized skills compared to other white collar workers such as bank tellers, bookkeepers, etc.

Pink-Collar: Traditionally stereotyped as "woman's work". Traditionally, men rarely worked these positions: Teacher, Flight Attendant, Hairdresser, Nurse, Secretary, Receptionist, etc.

Green-Collar: People who specialize in jobs that help with conservation and the environment. Could range from Architects to Solar Panel Designers, etc.

Gray-Collar: Most often thought of as jobs that older people take, but in actuality, could include jobs that combine elements of white and blue-collar jobs. For example, agribusiness, skilled trades, Food prep, protective services, etc. The main difference between blue collar and gray collar jobs is that blue collar workers are often trained on the job, while gray-collar workers may have a degree in a specific skill set. HR and insurance companies typically make this distinction due to liability and potential for injury.

Interesting. So Florida might be a "gray collar" state?
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Old 02-13-2010, 07:21 AM
 
Location: Soon to be Southlake, TX
648 posts, read 1,250,470 times
Reputation: 372
White collar cities may be diverse, but since they are white collar they lost most of the character they once had. Blue collar cities are real. They do not put on fake fronts to make their city look glamorous like NY, LA, Vegas, etc etc

The food is real, the people are real, the city is real.

The most famous chicken wings in the world, home of the original ones, up in Buffalo. If this was in NYC they would have turned it into a lights display. I love how they keep it real. And this is a major attraction to Buffalo and they still do not turn it into a tourist trap.
http://skateboardermag.com/skateboarder-news-features/cityscapes/AnchorBarBuffaloWings.jpg (broken link)





But in NYC, Applebee's is even glamoured up.

http://www.sengers.ch/usland/new-york/DSC_1903.jpg (broken link)
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Old 02-13-2010, 10:22 AM
 
Location: Cleveland bound with MPLS in the rear-view
5,531 posts, read 8,903,076 times
Reputation: 2331
^OMG! What a disappointment it must be for those who are unfamiliar with Applebees and are lured in by the fancy display!!
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Old 02-13-2010, 10:29 AM
 
Location: moving again
4,384 posts, read 14,251,214 times
Reputation: 1550
Quote:
Originally Posted by grindin View Post
If anything, Atlanta is more white collar than blue collar. There was a history of a decent-sized manufacturing base here, but much of the economy here was based on white collar jobs due to the city being HQ to many companies.

Much of the blue collar workforce here has been eroded over time. For example GM and Ford both closed their plants in Atlanta last decade.

People also forget there are other types of "collars" that have evolved over the years.

Gold Collar: People can't seem to make up their mind on what classifies a "Gold Collar" worker though. Some define it as younger, low-wage earners/luxury-seeking buyers. Many of whom work in retail or hospitality jobs. More often than not, they don't attend college. They may have high disposable income if they still live with their parents and/or not paying college tuition bills.

Others define "Gold-Collar" as "High-Skilled/Highly-Variable" workers. These are your computer programmers, stock analysts, community planners, etc. These were traditionally viewed as "white collar" jobs, but have warranted a new classification due to them having highly valuable/specialized skills compared to other white collar workers such as bank tellers, bookkeepers, etc.

Pink-Collar: Traditionally stereotyped as "woman's work". Traditionally, men rarely worked these positions: Teacher, Flight Attendant, Hairdresser, Nurse, Secretary, Receptionist, etc.

Green-Collar: People who specialize in jobs that help with conservation and the environment. Could range from Architects to Solar Panel Designers, etc.

Gray-Collar: Most often thought of as jobs that older people take, but in actuality, could include jobs that combine elements of white and blue-collar jobs. For example, agribusiness, skilled trades, Food prep, protective services, etc. The main difference between blue collar and gray collar jobs is that blue collar workers are often trained on the job, while gray-collar workers may have a degree in a specific skill set. HR and insurance companies typically make this distinction due to liability and potential for injury.
You forgot a few such as Tie Dye-Collar, Loose-Collar, and Collar-Collar!
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Old 02-13-2010, 02:30 PM
 
44,765 posts, read 63,094,871 times
Reputation: 9410
Quote:
Originally Posted by RussianIvanov View Post
White collar cities may be diverse, but since they are white collar they lost most of the character they once had. Blue collar cities are real. They do not put on fake fronts to make their city look glamorous like NY, LA, Vegas, etc etc

The food is real, the people are real, the city is real.

The most famous chicken wings in the world, home of the original ones, up in Buffalo. If this was in NYC they would have turned it into a lights display. I love how they keep it real. And this is a major attraction to Buffalo and they still do not turn it into a tourist trap.






But in NYC, Applebee's is even glamoured up.
That's why I like the cities in Upstate NY. They pretty much have that type of character you mentioned. There is a white collar side to those cities as well.
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Old 02-14-2010, 07:54 PM
 
Location: metro ATL
8,190 posts, read 10,543,191 times
Reputation: 2698
Quote:
Originally Posted by RussianIvanov View Post
White collar cities may be diverse, but since they are white collar they lost most of the character they once had. Blue collar cities are real. They do not put on fake fronts to make their city look glamorous like NY, LA, Vegas, etc etc

The food is real, the people are real, the city is real.
The last time I was in NYC and LA, I wasn't eating plastic apples, running into androids, or entering buildings made of styrofoam.
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