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Old 02-11-2010, 10:52 PM
 
Location: New Orleans, United States
4,236 posts, read 5,939,270 times
Reputation: 1322

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Quote:
Originally Posted by johnatl View Post
Yep. If I'm not mistaken, One Shell Plaza was taller than anything in Atlanta until the Westin was built.

My first visit to Nola was during the oil BOOM of the mid-late 70's. I was ready to move there almost on arrival!

My Mom was a Tulane grad, so I had heard so many wonderful stories over the years. Sadly, I haven't been down there since Katrina.

As far as MB now being Dillard's, I know. Sad.
You know I had forgotten all about that, but you're right about One Shell Square.

You should really come back, The recovery has finally started to kick in too.

It sucks, but I still prefer Dillard's over Macy's.
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Old 02-12-2010, 12:05 AM
 
4,475 posts, read 4,927,290 times
Reputation: 1100
Quote:
Originally Posted by WestbankNOLA View Post
Yeah, if we talk 90's-present (I know that's all that matters here right now, but I'm just saying). Compare NO to Atlanta, Dallas, and Houston 25 years ago. They basically grew past it, Houston at NOLA's expense. Thanks to the oil bust and some shady politics (both state and fed). Louisiana's economy basically ran to Houston like a hurricane was coming. IMO, if it wasn't for the political aspect, NOLA would be a much denser version of what Houston is today.

Reality: NOLA went from the very top to being so low that it can't go any other way but up. All cities will go through that phase (maybe not as extreme).
I would really like to research this. Is there any data you can refer me to? The BEA only goes to 2001. That would be interesting to see the top cities in 1970s and compare them to now. Also lookin at trends and other associated stuff.
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Old 02-12-2010, 09:32 PM
 
2,532 posts, read 3,758,165 times
Reputation: 1190
Quote:
Originally Posted by kdogg817 View Post
Look at all the snow in Dallas-Fort Worth. A winter wonderland. A foot of snow is expected in some areas of the DFW metropoltian area. So much for global warming I guess.




Posted by member Acntx
snow today Feb 11


Um, no.

If anything, a lot of the snow and wet weather the south has been receiving is arguably an indirect result of global warming. Remember, this is one of the stronger El Nino years on record that we've been having. El Nino = Warmer Pacific Ocean. When oceans warm up, more moisture evaporates. As moisture moves inland, it falls as snow.


http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases...1106052121.htm

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/topics/we...cientists.html


http://www.globalpost.com/dispatch/s...global-warming


http://news.medill.northwestern.edu/....aspx?id=79547

http://www.nbcaugusta.com/weather/we.../50414772.html

Last edited by grindin; 02-12-2010 at 09:46 PM..
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Old 02-13-2010, 07:04 PM
Status: "We need to talk" (set 16 days ago)
 
Location: Houston
5,625 posts, read 7,612,730 times
Reputation: 3922
Quote:
Originally Posted by grindin View Post
Um, no.

If anything, a lot of the snow and wet weather the south has been receiving is arguably an indirect result of global warming. Remember, this is one of the stronger El Nino years on record that we've been having. El Nino = Warmer Pacific Ocean. When oceans warm up, more moisture evaporates. As moisture moves inland, it falls as snow.


Global Warming Means More Snow For Great Lakes Region

Snow is consistent with global warming, say scientists - Telegraph


Snowstorms | Global warming | Climate Change


It's not just hot air; climate change could also mean more snow

El Nino could mean fewer hurricanes and more snow | NBC Augusta 26 | news, weather, sports, community, entertainment, shopping for Augusta, Georgia | Weather 101
You're right. That's why they call it Climate Change now instead of Global Warming. I will never understand why people are so against protecting our environment whether they believe in it or not. I don't care if Miami gets a blizzard before the winter is over. We still need to do what we can to make this planet livable for our children and grandchildren.
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Old 02-14-2010, 01:00 AM
 
4,475 posts, read 4,927,290 times
Reputation: 1100
Quote:
Originally Posted by westhou View Post
You're right. That's why they call it Climate Change now instead of Global Warming. I will never understand why people are so against protecting our environment whether they believe in it or not. I don't care if Miami gets a blizzard before the winter is over. We still need to do what we can to make this planet livable for our children and grandchildren.
Everybody has an agenda
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Old 02-14-2010, 11:14 PM
 
1,081 posts, read 1,311,330 times
Reputation: 570
Quote:
Originally Posted by adavi215 View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by grindin
What about the Twin Cities influence on the Upper Midwest? No doubt that Chicago dominates much of the Midwest, but I'm referring to MN, Eastern ND & SD, Northern Iowa, Northern Wisconsin, etc.
I would be interested in knowing this as well. Since I am not from the Mid-West I tend to think it is dominted by Chicago with various smaller-larger metros having niche areas. Kind of like how New York has of the Northeast. You have Boston-New England, Phily-Deleware Valley, Pittsburgh-Appalacia Northeast?, etc.
Chicago does dominate the midwest, but really its influence does not spread that much northeast of Madison. Minneapolis dominates a huge region from Western Wisconsin, throughout the state of Minnesota, Northern Iowa, the Dakotas (except eastern SD which is more influenced by Denver), to even Western Montana. Many smaller cities including La Crosse, Eau Claire, Rochester, St. Cloud, Duluth, Fargo, Sioux City, Mason City, Grand Forks, and Bismark are generally influenced by the Twin Cities. One easy way to see this is that with the exception of maybe La Crosse, the majority of sports fans in these cities follow the Twins and Vikings. Even Winnipeg is somewhat influenced by Minneapolis.

Chicago has a much smaller influence in these places. It's influence is felt much stronger in Iowa, Eastern Wisconsin, Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, and Northeaster Ohio.

One place I'm unfamiliar with and curious about is the UP? What major city is most influencial there? Chicago? Milwaukee? The Twin Cities? Detroit?
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Old 02-14-2010, 11:35 PM
 
Location: Lower East Side, Milwaukee, WI
2,950 posts, read 1,975,751 times
Reputation: 1113
Quote:
Originally Posted by MN55 View Post
One place I'm unfamiliar with and curious about is the UP? What major city is most influencial there? Chicago? Milwaukee? The Twin Cities? Detroit?
Marquette is the dominant city in the UP, but Green Bay and Appleton are very influential in their own ways. Yoopers do most of their major shopping (Xmas, back to school, etc.) in Green Bay and Appleton. Yoopers also usually tend to be Packer fans as opposed to Lions fans, but, honestly, who can blame them?
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Old 02-15-2010, 09:15 AM
 
4,475 posts, read 4,927,290 times
Reputation: 1100
What is UP?
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Old 02-15-2010, 09:22 AM
 
Location: West Cobb County, GA (Atlanta metro)
9,129 posts, read 21,702,676 times
Reputation: 4745
http://bestsmileys.com/signs1/15.gif (broken link)

WARNING:

The thread is degrading into a fight-fest with racial overtones. Not only will it soon be closed if this stuff continues, but infractions will fly as well. Stop the bickering and stay on topic, please.
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Old 02-15-2010, 10:14 AM
 
2,532 posts, read 3,758,165 times
Reputation: 1190
Quote:
Originally Posted by adavi215 View Post
What is UP?
What's up with you!

J/K. UP = Upper Peninsula of Michigan. I've always wondered what their "Dominant Area of Influence" is for them. For some reason, I don't think it's Detroit.
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