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Old 05-30-2007, 05:03 PM
 
154 posts, read 640,990 times
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i have to agree with west virginia. i passed through there once too and it was almost like i felt the wheels of time spinning backward. everything just seemed so disconnected from the rest of the country, and doesn't really seem like any of the areas in WV are progressive at all. seems like they're just living in their own backwards little world. no offense though, i thought the area i saw was really pretty for the most part.
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Old 05-30-2007, 09:37 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX
1,231 posts, read 3,441,999 times
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Two main regions:
1. Lower Mississippi River valley, away from the coast
2. Remote mountain areas of middle-Appalachia (in Kentucky, West Virginia and PA)
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Old 05-30-2007, 11:49 PM
 
Location: Katy-zuela
4,829 posts, read 8,962,296 times
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Bryan-College Station. The A&M students who took part in the minstrel show video on You Tube highlighted a racial problem in the university and/or the surrounding area. This took place when Gates was about to leave the A&M presidency to replace Rumsfeld as Secretary of Defense.
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Old 05-31-2007, 06:05 AM
 
134 posts, read 400,908 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by astroline95 View Post
i have to agree with west virginia. i passed through there once too and it was almost like i felt the wheels of time spinning backward. everything just seemed so disconnected from the rest of the country, and doesn't really seem like any of the areas in WV are progressive at all. seems like they're just living in their own backwards little world. no offense though, i thought the area i saw was really pretty for the most part.
I go through West Virginia on my to Pennsylvania to visit my relatives there and some of those PA towns can look depressing too. But I do enjoy the slower pace of life and the lush hillsides. Although a poor region, some of the nation's safest cities are in the Appalachain parts of PA and WV.
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Old 05-31-2007, 12:39 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX
1,231 posts, read 3,441,999 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by markdalton View Post
...I do enjoy the slower pace of life and the lush hillsides. Although a poor region, some of the nation's safest cities are in the Appalachain parts of PA and WV.
I agree and agree again. Yes, those remote mountain towns often show up as being among the safest in the USA. One reason for this might be the extremely tortuous roads through the region, isolating the mountain areas from "strangers" who pass through and cause crime stats to go up. More anonymity leads to more crime, that's proven over and over. When everyone knows each other, then you're all like family (this isn't meant to be a joke about marrying cousins, although... ) and people watch out for each other.

On the other hand, many crimes are likely to be under-reported in "backwards" areas because rape, incest, child molestation, drug dealing and other "in the family" types of crimes are simply overlooked by the locals. I'm not saying this because of a stereotype, I'm basing it on my travels, talking to people, and having friends who have lived in the rural parts of the middle-Appalachians and inland South.

"There are some things we just don't discuss." That's the attitude. Rape stats always go up rapidly as cities become more open and progressive. Same with child abuse. These are the sorts of crimes that occur in every culture on the planet and it's very difficult to suss them out and get people to talk openly about them. For every report of incest or child abuse, there are dozens of unreported cases. In isolated small towns there's a fear of talking about such things, everyone looks the other way. But I do agree that those regions tend to be safer from the types of crime that we see in sunbelt cities where everyone is a newcomer and people don't feel a sense of community.
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Old 05-31-2007, 04:21 PM
 
Location: Wi for the summer--Vegas in the winter
653 posts, read 3,128,956 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CHICAGOLAND92 View Post
Out of all of the places you've been, from a small farm to a great urban metropolis, which areas of our great country seem to be backwards, socially? Meaning, where do people show hostility to newcomers, unfair work practice, prejudice, segregation, etc.
Possibly the U.P. Of Michigan> It is beautiful there though!!
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Old 05-31-2007, 08:22 PM
 
Location: UPSTATE SC
1,411 posts, read 2,157,256 times
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I haven't been to every state . . . but have travelled extensively.

My husband has relatives in Alabama, there are some sections there that are extremely backwards, segregated. Some areas where I was afraid to use the restroom and speak to anyone (with my NY accent).
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Old 06-01-2007, 09:18 AM
 
Location: Austin, TX
1,231 posts, read 3,441,999 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lifesigns64 View Post
...Some areas where I was afraid to use the restroom and speak to anyone (with my NY accent).
A wise precaution.

I've been in rural areas of east Texas, gorgeous countryside but scary social scene. I remember a group of young redneck guys staring a hole right through me when I stopped in a tiny one-store town to get gas and a snack. The way they stared and didn't respond to my attempt at being friendly made me afraid for my life. It was like "Who you think you are, you don't belong here Boy!" I can't imagine what it would feel like to be at that same store if I were black or had a strong northern accent. Worst thing for me is simply that I drive a foreign car and don't have a hick accent. Normally I can fake my way through any situation, though.

There was a town deep in the West Virginia mountains where people looked at me funny but it didn't feel threatening. It was more like curiosity. Maybe they thought I was a social worker or a university researcher coming to help them or poke and prod around their brains. It was a substantial sized town and I asked if there was a coffeehouse. Nobody could answer the question because they didn't know what I meant! Finally someone directed me to a drug store that had some nasty-tasting coffee in a big dispenser but I was desperate for caffeine so I gagged it down. It was hilarious the way people seemed to have never heard the word "coffeehouse" in a town of at least 10,000 people. THAT is what I call BACKWARD!
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Old 06-01-2007, 03:40 PM
 
Location: Baton Rouge
369 posts, read 1,495,037 times
Reputation: 207
Jefferson County Mississippi. I've only visited a few times because that's where my great-aunt lived, and it was really backwoods and creepy (I found somebody's teeth in the woods while hiking near her house). It was like a blast from the past. It earns a hands-down A+ for scenery though.
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Old 06-11-2007, 01:22 PM
 
Location: Houston Texas
2,898 posts, read 2,868,847 times
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I've lived in New York (18 yrs) California (2 yrs) and Houston (last 3 yrs) and I found California, at least in San Diego where I was to be the most backward
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