U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S. > City vs. City
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 02-22-2010, 12:00 PM
 
13,318 posts, read 13,032,759 times
Reputation: 3415
Houston
Dallas
Atlanta
Las Vegas
Austin
Phoenix
Charlotte
The Sunbelt
So On and So forth.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 02-22-2010, 12:03 PM
 
725 posts, read 785,788 times
Reputation: 236
Atlanta, Dallas, Houston, Austin, Charlotte, Reigleih-Durham, Phoenix...

Sunblet special...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-22-2010, 12:11 PM
 
725 posts, read 785,788 times
Reputation: 236
Quote:
Originally Posted by west336 View Post
Wow! I am beginning to question these projections for cities that large/dispersed -- where are 1 million people going to live? Are these cities (Dallas, Houston, Atlanta) going to be much more vertical? Something has to give, IMO.
There is a lot of room in Atlanta... trust me. Especially when homes are selling for 20,000

Last edited by theATLien; 02-22-2010 at 12:36 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-22-2010, 12:13 PM
 
15,969 posts, read 25,451,659 times
Reputation: 5900
Quote:
Originally Posted by west336 View Post
Wow! I am beginning to question these projections for cities that large/dispersed -- where are 1 million people going to live? Are these cities (Dallas, Houston, Atlanta) going to be much more vertical? Something has to give, IMO.

I think we (Dallas) have about 50 miles of rail now and will be close to 100 miles in the next two years as two more lines open. Another downtown subway section and streetcars are planned for the next 5-7 years. The city of Dallas and a couple of the older 'burbs are encouraging TODs and density through various zoning and incentive tools. Also Dallas is trying to convert outdated skyscrapers into residential.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-22-2010, 02:07 PM
 
1,206 posts, read 1,072,736 times
Reputation: 717
Quote:
Originally Posted by rnc2mbfl View Post
I think that Americans prefer "big" to "small" (for the money) and that correlates to suburbia. Even in suburbia, it's amazing how much people will give up in terms of location for 500 more square feet. If people could buy big places DT on the cheap, I think that the DT areas of many cities would be exploding with people.
I can't count the number of times that I have watched these house hunter type shows on HGTV where the buyer said they wanted to be in the city and ended up in the burbs "because you get more house". The excess mentality and a recalibration of needs vs. wants has to change in order for the suburban model to slow. Let's be real here, a family of 4 doesn't "need" a 3500 square foot house. That's a "want". When I was a kid, my family of 6 lived in a very nice home that was under 1600 SF and nobody suffered from not having a bonus room, 4 bathrooms or a 3 car garage....I'm just sayin'....
a very accurate assessment of the excess and greed and the american suburbia model. ultimately, it is this entire cycle that got most of us into the current mess w/ foreclosures, some of the ridiculous investment expectations, and the failure of many to exercise fiscal responsibility.

realators sell land, housing investors and contractors build dwellings bigger and bigger, banks and lending institutions make loans, and so on and so forth. yet, when all is said and done, it comes back to the individual. most of us can do wonderfully well w/ a home that is 1300 to 1800 sq ft.
entitlement, keeping up w/ the joneses, i want my children to have everything that i didn't, are just a few of the reasons that suburbia continues to swallow up miles and miles of land. upon entering the 21st century, and for the first time in history, more than half of america's population lives in urban america. obviously, demand for land will exceed supply, premiums for property will become the norm, and living in small gated communities on half acre lots will become a real luxury.

inner city reclamation of land will have to occur, which could be a very good thing for the community at large. perhaps, some real thinking as to how land could best be utilized will occur. a 22 story tower housing 300 or so individuals could be much more appropriate than 30 houses housing 100 individuals on 30 quarter acre lots. either way, land is going to continue an upward swing in value in these settings, and those who have it, preferably clear and free, have a valuable commodity. consequently, land and its intrinsic worth is the one thing that both suburbia and the inner city have in common.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-22-2010, 02:28 PM
 
308 posts, read 528,641 times
Reputation: 423
Default Memphis? you have got to be kidding

You must be from Memphis, surely. Having to go on buisness from Chicago to downtown Memphis quite frequently, it is the same as going from heaven and decending into hell. Run down, desolate, and filled with homeless, you tell me what the attraction to a place like Memphis would be?? Your airport, many times, is desolate as well, and the only plus is that there is no line in order to get through security. Just a view from the outside looking in.



Quote:
Originally Posted by kingchef View Post
i think we are going to see a little less emphasis on tourism, business travel, etc. because of petro prices, the use of technology in teleconferencing, the importance of this technology in saving companies considerable amounts of cash, travel time, hotel bills, so on and so forth, and, of course, the one upsmanship on any way that "green something" can be tied in to the whole thing.

i think cities that have highly educated/highly skilled workers will become the expectation and the rule instead of the exception in urban centers.

cities like memphis, which has spent billions of dollars on its airport/transportation modals, rails, and interstate investments will be strongly in the game. the new green energy plant, the billions spent on the various medical centers, the biomedical research, hospital technology, such as the merrick institute, and the diversified memphis economy will do well.

memphis, according to the u.s. census bureau, has a steady metro growth of 6.1%. although i think memphis will continue to take its share of tourism (having the most visited attraction in the state), i think the other items listed will be the impetus for quick smart growth in the midsouth. i hope the new mayor will make up much of the lost 17 years.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-22-2010, 04:22 PM
 
2,368 posts, read 3,440,323 times
Reputation: 617
New Orleans, Houston and San Antonio where the fastest growing in raw numbers.

San Antonio Is The Third Fastest-Growing City In America : San Antonio Real Estate (http://www.searchsahomes.net/san-antonio-is-the-third-fastest-growing-city-in-america/ - broken link)
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-22-2010, 04:35 PM
 
Location: South Beach and DT Raleigh
7,923 posts, read 9,407,650 times
Reputation: 5999
Quote:
Originally Posted by theATLien View Post
Atlanta, Dallas, Houston, Austin, Charlotte, Reigleih-Durham, Phoenix...

Sunblet special...
Where's Reigleih? Is that near Altentla?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-23-2010, 10:41 AM
 
725 posts, read 785,788 times
Reputation: 236
Quote:
Originally Posted by rnc2mbfl View Post
Where's Reigleih? Is that near Altentla?
Look I just type and go. You knew what I meant.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-23-2010, 11:34 AM
 
Location: ITL (Houston)
8,969 posts, read 8,362,934 times
Reputation: 3250
Texas will remain a boom state in the 10s. Look at the big four (Houston, DFW, Austin, and San Antonio) to continue being near the top of positive lists (growth, housing, etc.).

Quote:
Originally Posted by waronxmas View Post
Atlanta and Miami both have subways and large bus networks. Dallas and Houston have light rail, Dallas is especially expanding there's, and large bus networks. Charlotte is starting their light rail lines, and New Orleans is rebuilding there's.

What major cities in the south don't have "little to no infrastructure" for public transportation?
Houston expanding it's own as well. Phase II is well under construction.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $84,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S. > City vs. City

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top