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Old 06-01-2007, 06:38 PM
 
1,008 posts, read 3,723,101 times
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Haha...I read that article Lakewooder! Funny stuff, especially considering it being DALLAS. I don't know, I like many people viewed TEXAS to be extremely right wing, it seems like it's undergone a full 60 degree shift from where it used to be.

Conservative states:...Alabama (whole state) Atlanta, Utah, Louisville and unfortunately you guys are right....the majority of surrounding burbs in Illinois are conservative but Chicago is like 70 percent liberal and 30 percent conservative. But everyone seems to get along well.
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Old 06-01-2007, 06:44 PM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
18,560 posts, read 26,892,435 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Supernova7 View Post
Haha...I read that article Lakewooder! Funny stuff, especially considering it being DALLAS. I don't know, I like many people viewed TEXAS to be extremely right wing, it seems like it's undergone a full 60 degree shift from where it used to be.

.
I bet Houston has a similar story, though. Dallas was voted as the most liberal in the state of Texas. More than Austin. Texas is a conservative state, though. But I believe that the democrats will start to become more popular as the state continues to urbanize itself.
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Old 06-01-2007, 06:51 PM
 
Location: Houston, TX
832 posts, read 3,549,145 times
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Houston is overall Blue. The suburbs (ie Kingwood/Woodlands) primarily red. In Kingwood, its 56% red, 44% blue. However, for the most part, it is more libertarian type of conservative rather than the religious right.
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Old 06-01-2007, 10:55 PM
 
764 posts, read 2,263,970 times
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Originally Posted by Steve-o View Post
Chicago is definitely blue, but most of the suburbs are red, surprisingly. Er, at least DuPage County is.
The Chicago suburbs still tilt Republican (as with most suburban areas since they are often relatively high income places), but it's nowhere near the conservative haven that it used to be. In fact, a disproportionate number of formerly solid Republican suburban Chicago Congressional seats have turned into some of the most hotly contested races in the country because of the demographic changes. Lake County is now a political toss-up (whereas 20 years ago no Democrats ever bothered to campaign there since it would have been pointless), while DuPage County is still a Republican majority but it's been eroding to the point where it will be probably be a toss-up within the next couple of election cycles. I think you're seeing this in a lot of wealthy suburban areas outside of fairly liberal cities that were once considered Republican havens - i.e. Orange County, California and Westchester County, New York. That's because suburban Republicans are typically more of the libertarian variety as opposed to the social conservative types, so they are pretty open to New Democrats. Overall, there isn't much patience for people preaching about hot-button social issues such as banning gay marriage or abortion in these type of suburbs - that's a huge turnoff. On the other hand, they also typically don't like the "tax the rich" proposals of liberals since they see themselves as the ones being forced to foot the bill, so there's going to be continued advantage for Republicans on economic issues in the affluent suburbs.

Exurbs on the fringes of large metro areas, however, are a different story. Those are really the new centers of traditional conservatism. While these areas are extremely fast-growing, though, they still aren't as populous as the closer-in suburbs.

The upshot of the changes in the Chicago suburbs? When you combine a complete dominance of the Democrats in the city of Chicago along with decent inroads in the suburbs, the state of Illinois has gone from being a "bell weather" state like Missouri or Ohio to being as solid blue of a state as New York or California. I'm a libertarian Republican and I'd have to admit that the Democrats are going to dominate here for a long time (while any Republican that hopes to win here will need to be a real moderate a la Arnold in California or the Giuliani/Bloomberg mayoral succession in NYC - even with the presence of conservative downstate Illinois, there's no way that a traditional conservative is ever going to win statewide).
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Old 06-01-2007, 11:42 PM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
3,742 posts, read 6,863,613 times
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Originally Posted by Highpointer View Post
Why are rural areas in Iowa and northern Illinois more liberal than rural areas in states like Missouri, Indiana, or Ohio?
I dunno, farther north I guess? MAybe Des Moines is big enough to overwhelm the rural areas. I'm just assuming since Iowa was an overwhelming blue state when Bush and Kerry were running against each other that since Illinois and Iowa both wound up blue that Northern Illinois shared the same attitudes as Iowans. Maybe it was just Chicago...I dunno...it's a theory. But Iowa nevertheless is a very blue state.
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Old 06-01-2007, 11:53 PM
 
764 posts, read 2,263,970 times
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Originally Posted by ajf131 View Post
I dunno, farther north I guess? MAybe Des Moines is big enough to overwhelm the rural areas. I'm just assuming since Iowa was an overwhelming blue state when Bush and Kerry were running against each other that since Illinois and Iowa both wound up blue that Northern Illinois shared the same attitudes as Iowans. Maybe it was just Chicago...I dunno...it's a theory. But Iowa nevertheless is a very blue state.
A lot of the rural parts of Indiana, Missouri and Ohio (and even the southern tip of Illinois) are adjacent to the south or have more of a southern influence, which might explain the conservatism (although all of the rural areas are pretty conservative in general). Meanwhile, there's no doubt that Northern Illinois and Iowa are the north, which has a bit more of progressive streak (see also Wisconsin and Minnesota).
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Old 06-02-2007, 12:35 AM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
3,742 posts, read 6,863,613 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Frank the Tank View Post
A lot of the rural parts of Indiana, Missouri and Ohio (and even the southern tip of Illinois) are adjacent to the south or have more of a southern influence, which might explain the conservatism (although all of the rural areas are pretty conservative in general). Meanwhile, there's no doubt that Northern Illinois and Iowa are the north, which has a bit more of progressive streak (see also Wisconsin and Minnesota).
I agree 100% with that statement.
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Old 06-02-2007, 09:22 AM
 
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Birmingham, Alabama
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Old 06-02-2007, 09:54 AM
 
Location: Nashville
81 posts, read 295,936 times
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From my experience living in Indianapolis, as most residents will tell you, the city is more of a middle of the road town; moderate leaning.

The suburbs are pretty conservative though.

And jeez, you all toss conservative around as if it's an insult around here.
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Old 06-02-2007, 04:52 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,804 posts, read 102,103,104 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Highpointer
Why are rural areas in Iowa and northern Illinois more liberal than rural areas in states like Missouri, Indiana, or Ohio?
Quote:
Originally Posted by ajf131 View Post
I dunno, farther north I guess? MAybe Des Moines is big enough to overwhelm the rural areas. I'm just assuming since Iowa was an overwhelming blue state when Bush and Kerry were running against each other that since Illinois and Iowa both wound up blue that Northern Illinois shared the same attitudes as Iowans. Maybe it was just Chicago...I dunno...it's a theory. But Iowa nevertheless is a very blue state.
I think the majority of people in Iowa live in the cities and towns. Some of the cities in Iowa are very blue-collar places, probably vote democratic. If the farmers are voting straight republican (which they surely aren't), they would still be outnumbered. Iowa also has a reuptation as a highly educated state. (Not to say that people in those other states are not educated)
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