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Old 06-09-2007, 07:05 AM
 
Location: Headed to the Shangri-La; The Orange County(Huntington Beach or Mission Viejo) this August!
78 posts, read 423,767 times
Reputation: 81

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Quote:
Originally Posted by cre8 View Post
I must say, with 20 million people in S CA, and another 6 million on the way by 2020, someone's makin' babies; we're not all transplants.
Yeah, that's the Mexicans..

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Old 06-09-2007, 12:29 PM
 
Location: Shallow alcove hidden from the telescreen
2,798 posts, read 9,718,962 times
Reputation: 1430
Default Talk about a one-track mind

Quote:
Originally Posted by fashionablecowboy View Post
Yeah, that's the Mexicans..

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Oh, brother, how predictable can you get.

Mexican people in CA is not the point! The discussion here regards a side-bar question of the main topic -- Portland vs. Denver -- about urban areas and families vs. singles/childless people. That's the point. So come on, leave Mexican people out of it. Don't go there. It's boring!

Last edited by Winston Smith; 06-09-2007 at 12:40 PM.. Reason: Add wink to show civility.
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Old 06-09-2007, 01:05 PM
 
Location: Monterey County, CA
5,163 posts, read 11,766,714 times
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The Mexican culture does seems more family oriented as a whole than Californians (I am a native) and hence tend to have larger families. But whole issue is way off topic. So lets get back to comparing Portland vs. Denver.

Thank you,

- Derek
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Old 06-09-2007, 10:55 PM
 
1,008 posts, read 3,672,892 times
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No competition in my opinion. Portland all the way. Denver would never be "my" home but it's home to others. Comes down to what you like and Denver doesn't have the social / political climate I seek.
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Old 07-16-2007, 11:19 PM
 
Location: Monterey County, CA
5,163 posts, read 11,766,714 times
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Supernova7,

I am curious if you have actually visited and/or lived in either place? Perception can be much different from personal experience. I am not saying you are wrong, because everyone has their own preferences. I am just wondering if you have actually been to either place?

The reason I ask the question is because I believe both places have their own stereotypes. These stereotypes are not necessisarily reflective of either city as a whole. For example if speaking politically I know things vary a lot in the greater Denver area, especially as you look at the inner city and areas toward Boulder (Liberal vs Conservative). And Portland, although known as a liberal haven, has conservative neighborhoods and suburbs.

I think my main point is that these areas differ far beyond what their political stereotypes might indicate. I know when I compare 'liberal' California to 'conservative' Denver and 'ultra conservative' Colorado Springs the true cultural differences far surpass these political stereotypes in almost every way.
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Old 07-30-2007, 06:33 PM
 
45 posts, read 239,726 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MileHighSigh View Post
Yeah. I think you've hit it on the head. The truth is that as great as the ocean is, you would probably be pining for the mountains after a while away from Colorado.

You're especially right about the family values and societal norms in Denver vs. the west coast. Basically, in Colorado you are kind of expected to grow up, get married, have a few kids, go to church, work hard, love your country, and do the right thing. It's the old American dream still kickin' and alive.

Places like LA and Portland have moved beyond that. Apparently, they call it "progress." But you've got a bunch of unhappy, well-sunned, singles who aer all running around searching for that missing something that they won't find because they're looking in all the wrong places.

Forget politics. It's about the basic lifestyle in Denver. Denver's conservative politics probably influence the family values, but there's just a traditionalism--a 1950s black/white Mayberry way of life--in Denver that you won't find on the coast.

I think that's one thing that a lot of folks fail to appreciate about Denver. Everybody talks about the skiiing--but few have ever realized just how "leave it to beaver" Denver really is.
Amazing. Are you saying that this is the "right" way to live, and people who choose a different path are lost or unhappy. What a joke.

What makes Portland and other "unhappy" west coast cities so great is that they allow for differences, where people aren't judged because they don't go to church, or choose to not get married, or don't love their country.

Denver's image is white bread, mega churches, and the American flag. Sounds boring to me.
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Old 07-30-2007, 08:02 PM
 
5,767 posts, read 10,042,860 times
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Denver's murder rate is quite a bit higher than Portland's rate. Clearly, people in Portland are more respectful of the Biblical commandment 'Thou Shalt Not Kill' than people in Denver, even if more Portlanders are atheists.

Something to think about.
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Old 07-30-2007, 08:29 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
85,047 posts, read 98,999,163 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by elainebenes View Post
Amazing. Are you saying that this is the "right" way to live, and people who choose a different path are lost or unhappy. What a joke.

What makes Portland and other "unhappy" west coast cities so great is that they allow for differences, where people aren't judged because they don't go to church, or choose to not get married, or don't love their country.

Denver's image is white bread, mega churches, and the American flag. Sounds boring to me.
As you may have noted, Mile High Sigh is "not a member". In fact, I think he is a troll who has had several names. No, Denver is not the above. Denver is very diverse and libertarian. Whole Foods was founded in Boulder, which is basically part of the metro area.

Also, these west coast cities sound kind of smug and/or self-righteous to me.

Last edited by Katarina Witt; 07-30-2007 at 08:46 PM..
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Old 07-31-2007, 12:21 AM
 
Location: from houstoner to bostoner to new yorker to new jerseyite ;)
4,085 posts, read 11,236,885 times
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I lived in Denver and the white bread image I keep reading about here wasn't my experience of it at all. I think compared to the West Coast, almost any city will come up short, using their brand of liberalism as a yardstick.

Quote:
Originally Posted by pittnurse70 View Post
Whole Foods was founded in Boulder, which is basically part of the metro area.
Whole Foods was founded in Austin, Texas. Do you mean Wild Oats? They've merged with Whole Foods now, I think, or are planning to. It was only a matter of time. When I lived in Denver years ago the two stores were practically mirror images of each other then.
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Old 07-31-2007, 12:32 AM
 
Location: Denver, CO
5,607 posts, read 20,219,868 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by houstoner View Post
I lived in Denver and the white bread image I keep reading about here wasn't my experience of it at all. I think compared to the West Coast, almost any city will come up short, using their brand of liberalism as a yardstick.



Whole Foods was founded in Austin, Texas. Do you mean Wild Oats? They've merged with Whole Foods now, I think, or are planning to.
I'd say if anything the "white bread" image is just as true, if not even more true for the Pacific Northwest than for Denver! There are parts of the Denver area that are very white-- like Boulder, the suburbs of Boulder, and Douglas County. However, other parts, like Aurora, Capitol Hill, Lakewood, are very diverse. Neither city can claim bragging rights on how "white" or "non-white" each city is. Both cities have more in common with each other than either has with a New York City, that's for sure. Boulder I'd say can be a very pretentious area, but I can also say that Aurora (the eastern suburb of Denver), in particular, is definitely unpretentious, unglamorous, and down to earth. And yeah, the chain that pittnurse70 meant (or should have meant) is Wild Oats. A whole slew of other nationally successful chain restaurants started in Boulder-- like Noodles and Co, for example.
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