U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S. > City vs. City
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 03-12-2010, 01:38 PM
 
Location: SF Bay Area
10,401 posts, read 13,933,001 times
Reputation: 5559

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by WestbankNOLA View Post
It's simple. Flagler is the North South dividing line. Miami Ave is the East West divider. If the street says SW, then it's south of Flagler and west of Miami. It sounds like you're making it harder than it is.

The only place I can see SW 50th being north of NW60th would be at the Dade/Broward line where the grid starts over, but doesn't Dade go up to like 200? I think it would be like SW 50th a block north of NW 205th
Yeah it's easy when you live there or know the street system. Flagler and Miami don't form the quadrants for the entire region, you seem to be trying to make it simpler than it is.Go look at the corner of McNab Rd and Cypress Rd in Broward County, shows exactly what I am talking about. And there are other parts that are like that.


Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 03-12-2010, 01:50 PM
 
Location: New Orleans, United States
4,236 posts, read 5,936,372 times
Reputation: 1322
Quote:
Originally Posted by sav858 View Post
Yeah it's easy when you live there or know the street system. Flagler and Miami don't form the quadrants for the entire region, you seem to be trying to make it simpler than it is.Go look at the corner of McNab Rd and Cypress Rd in Broward County, shows exactly what I am talking about. And there are other parts that are like that.


Not too many "regions" share one giant street plan. I kind of expect the street plan to change from corp limit to corp limit in most places.

If those are 2 different towns or places then it makes sense (according to Yahoo maps that is the case). If it's in the same place then it is screwed.

^It's not that complicated to me, personally. It's the same concept in almost every city even those with the curvy windy streets.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-12-2010, 02:02 PM
 
Location: SF Bay Area
10,401 posts, read 13,933,001 times
Reputation: 5559
Quote:
Originally Posted by WestbankNOLA View Post
Not too many "regions" share one giant street plan. I kind of expect the street plan to change from corp limit to corp limit in most places.

If those are 2 different towns or places then it makes sense (according to Yahoo maps that is the case). If it's in the same place then it is screwed.

^It's not that complicated to me, personally. It's the same concept in almost every city even those with the curvy windy streets.
If the street numbering system changed when you crossed into a new city then that would seem reasonable, but that only works if city limits form a square/rectangle which few if any do. If it was one grid system for an entire county that would be even easier, but that is not the case with Broward County, not sure if Miami-Dade is different or not. Out of all the grid systems I've seen, the ones in Broward County and Miami-Dade are the most confusing to me.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-12-2010, 02:08 PM
 
Location: New Orleans, United States
4,236 posts, read 5,936,372 times
Reputation: 1322
Quote:
Originally Posted by sav858 View Post
If the street numbering system changed when you crossed into a new city then that would seem reasonable, but that only works if city limits form a square/rectangle which few if any do.
Well, that's usually how it works everywhere I've been. It would make sense for an entire metro to have the same street plan, but I've never seen it. Most cities regardless of shape, have their own numbering/naming plan. The thing is you have to know when your leaving one municipality for the next. That was the issue with that intersection you showed me. The south side of the street was one place, the northside another.

Oh well...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-13-2010, 10:21 PM
 
5,231 posts, read 9,583,115 times
Reputation: 2346
Quote:
Originally Posted by sav858 View Post
Has anyone ever noticed the bizarre numbering system in South Florida? NW, SW, NE, and SE even though they all run either directly north-south or east-west. You have streets that are called NW60th that are a few blocks directly south of a street named SW 20th St. And or course you have SW 55th ST, SW 55th CT, SW 55th Ave, etc... I've never seen such a simple grid street pattern make such little sense.
Most of S FL's cities have numbered streets, as you describe. They are very logical with their own cities, but when you cross city lines, the numbering scheme may be different, resulting in the confusion you mention. In Dade County, almost all cities and towns use the same system, biggest exceptions being Miami Beach, Hialeah and Coral Gables. Hialeah has its own numbering, so a street that is called NW 32 St in Miami, for example, may be called E. 6th St when it crosses the city line into Hialeah. Also, when you cross the county line from Dade to Broward, the numbering re-sets from NE or NW to SE or SW.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-14-2010, 10:06 PM
 
Location: Long Beach
2,351 posts, read 1,473,721 times
Reputation: 873
As the nation grew in the 19th century, the easiest way to lay out a city was in grids, it's just efficient. The ancient Romans and Greeks did the exact same thing. Very old cities, New York and Boston aren't on grids, they aren't planned cities. Philadelphia was planned in the 1680s. New Haven was laid out in 1640 which is the first planned city in America. It's safe to assume that cities founded before 1640 are not going to be on a grid. Which happens to be every city in New England. New England cities are influenced by their geography. For example the earliest streets in Springfield were laid out perpendicular to the Connecticut River as they correspond to plots of land by the 1630's settlers.

Before you bite my head off, lower Manhattan isn't a grid, the grid wouldn't appear until 1811.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-15-2010, 08:28 AM
 
2,532 posts, read 3,756,739 times
Reputation: 1190
Isn't much of the Upper Midwest laid out on a grid system (well, at least the major streets) because of the survey of the land done because it was a part of the NW Territory?

Is that what explains though long numbered addresses that you can run into in Wisconsin, LOL?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-15-2010, 08:36 AM
 
Location: Mequon
6,861 posts, read 12,260,725 times
Reputation: 3026
I love Milwaukee's grid system, all the the way from 1st to 200th street! It just makes life easier. I hate rats nests of a city like a Madison WI or Waukesha WI.

Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-15-2010, 08:50 AM
 
Location: South Beach and DT Raleigh
8,051 posts, read 9,794,960 times
Reputation: 6189
Quote:
Originally Posted by sav858 View Post
Has anyone ever noticed the bizarre numbering system in South Florida? NW, SW, NE, and SE even though they all run either directly north-south or east-west. You have streets that are called NW60th that are a few blocks directly south of a street named SW 20th St. And or course you have SW 55th ST, SW 55th CT, SW 55th Ave, etc... I've never seen such a simple grid street pattern make such little sense.
The NW, SW, NE and SE designations tell you what quadrant of the city the specific location is.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-15-2010, 09:03 AM
 
Location: West Seattle, WA
12,873 posts, read 19,552,830 times
Reputation: 5775
Atlanta has a longstanding tradition of naming its' streets for dead white people. A less longstanding tradition has been to rename those same streets for live black people.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $84,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S. > City vs. City

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top