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Old 06-23-2008, 01:21 PM
 
Location: Virginia
10 posts, read 90,333 times
Reputation: 13

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I think it would go like this starting with the most southern, especially when you are considering food, values, manners, traditions and cultures

Georgia
Tennessee
Kentucky
Alabama
North C
South C
Louisiana
Virginia
Mississippi
Florida
Texas
Oklahoma

This is my non bias list but really in my mind VIRGINIA will always be on the top.
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Old 06-23-2008, 04:18 PM
 
Location: Kentucky
2,927 posts, read 7,395,791 times
Reputation: 1301
Why is Oklahoma listed in this thread as being in the South?? Uhhh, somebody is mistaking I do believe.
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Old 06-23-2008, 04:36 PM
 
122 posts, read 289,863 times
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[quote=InLondon;4205587]Why is Oklahoma listed in this thread as being in the South?? Uhhh, somebody is mistaking I do believe


I don't know why Oklahoma keeps getting lumped in with us...neither Missouri. What's the reasoning again? I've never been either place.
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Old 06-23-2008, 05:36 PM
 
10,167 posts, read 16,652,070 times
Reputation: 5695
[quote=tnprincess;4205782]
Quote:
Originally Posted by InLondon View Post
Why is Oklahoma listed in this thread as being in the South?? Uhhh, somebody is mistaking I do believe

I don't know why Oklahoma keeps getting lumped in with us...neither Missouri. What's the reasoning again? I've never been either place.
*grins* This question comes up a lot, so IMHO, here is the reason...

The broadest definition of the U.S. Census Bureau map includes 16 states, and believe it or not, one of them is actually Delaware! LOL And Missouri has a bit of historical claim to being Southern as at least a noteable percentage fought for the Confederacy during the War. Oklahoma has a Confederate connection (most of the native-American tribes allying with the Confederacy), and during the "Boomer Sooner" days, eastern and southern parts were settled mostly by folks from Arkansas and Texas.

So, as concerns this thread and topic, I think the reason is to expand it all the way out to the broadest definition possible...and then work down from there!

Here is a good link with some good maps on it all:

Southern United States - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 06-23-2008, 05:43 PM
 
Location: Fort Worth/Dallas
11,878 posts, read 32,934,171 times
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There is only a very small portion of Oklahoma that (IMO) could ever be lumped into being "Southern."

That would be the very far Southeastern portion of the state that is known as "Little Dixie."

Otherwise, it's Southern Plains or Southwest. Again, in my opinion because I'm not the expert on such things.
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Old 06-24-2008, 10:35 AM
 
Location: Alabama!
5,802 posts, read 15,490,962 times
Reputation: 4272
Quote:
Originally Posted by JMT View Post
Yeah Tennessee is pretty Southern but not nearly as Southern as surrounding states.
There are different kinds of "Southern," from a coastal "magnolias and moonlight" Southern to a redneck farmer Southern to mountaineer Southern to coal mining Southern...you can't say one is "more" or "less" Southern than another.
Kind of like saying all Yankees...er, Northerners...are all like the folks from northern New Jersey, with the same accent and same attitude.
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Old 06-24-2008, 11:58 AM
 
122 posts, read 289,863 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Southlander View Post
There are different kinds of "Southern," from a coastal "magnolias and moonlight" Southern to a redneck farmer Southern to mountaineer Southern to coal mining Southern...you can't say one is "more" or "less" Southern than another.
Kind of like saying all Yankees...er, Northerners...are all like the folks from northern New Jersey, with the same accent and same attitude.

No...we must not lump all Yankees together, they can be just as diverse as we are....with all having the same attitude! HE HE HE!
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Old 06-24-2008, 12:18 PM
 
Location: Coastal South Carolina
330 posts, read 1,065,831 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tnprincess View Post
No...we must not lump all Yankees together, they can be just as diverse as we are....with all having the same attitude! HE HE HE!

Hey, now! Be nice!

As a newly transplanted Charlestonian, I am trying my best to assimilate. I'm even trying to get a hang of a Southern accent. The only problem is my NJ/Philly accent keeps getting in the way.

Just imagine that combination.

(I'm kidding..)
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Old 06-24-2008, 12:39 PM
 
10,167 posts, read 16,652,070 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by imperieux View Post
As a newly transplanted Charlestonian, I am trying my best to assimilate. I'm even trying to get a hang of a Southern accent. The only problem is my NJ/Philly accent keeps getting in the way.

Just imagine that combination.

(I'm kidding..)
LOL I've never been to Charleston, but that getting the accent might be a chore as it seems that area has one of their very own! I say that because of this map:

Image:Southern American English.svg - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The map itself shows the approximate range of Southern American English, according to certain criteria. Note the little "notch" around Charleston?

Of course to say Charleston, South Carolina, isn't Southern would be like saying Newark, New Jersey IS! But seriously, I HAVE heard that many natives of the city and area speak a very unique dialect of SAE. Sorta like as do some cajun areas of far southern Louisiana and (very) extreme areas of southeast Texas.

Here is the main link, by the way, which kinda explains it all. Very interesting, I thought!

Southern American English - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Last edited by TexasReb; 06-24-2008 at 01:23 PM..
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Old 06-24-2008, 01:14 PM
 
Location: Coastal South Carolina
330 posts, read 1,065,831 times
Reputation: 140
Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasReb View Post
But seriously, I HAVE heard that many natives of the city and area speak a very unique dialect of SAE, sorta like some cajun areas of far southern Louisiana and (very) extreme areas of southeast Texas.
You're right. Some of the natives have a very distinct dialect which is unlike the southern accent I am familiar with.

I find it completely charming.
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