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Old 02-11-2014, 02:31 PM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
Interesting list; what's the criteria? I think all of Mississippi should be included, as well as eastern TN and western AK (pretty much the entire MS Delta region and environs); most of SC except the Upstate (northwestern SC) is also included. Throw in eastern NC and I think that pretty much rounds out the region.
Nome is not a Deep South city.
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Old 02-11-2014, 02:31 PM
 
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North Carolina is the future of the SE states. Good future IMO
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Old 02-11-2014, 02:32 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Spade View Post
Nome is not a Deep South city.
Dammit, meant AR lol...fixed!
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Old 02-11-2014, 03:38 PM
 
Location: The Magnolia City
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
Interesting list; what's the criteria? I think all of Mississippi should be included, as well as eastern TN and western AR (pretty much the entire MS Delta region and environs); most of SC except the Upstate (northwestern SC) is also included. Throw in eastern NC and I think that pretty much rounds out the region.
The only reason I exclude northern Mississippi and the northern Delta is because nowadays they tend to refer to themselves as the Mid-South, for whatever distinctions there may be. Southern Mississippi and northern Mississippi are different places nowadays.

I know we disagree about the inclusion of certain parts of the Carolinas.
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Old 02-11-2014, 03:58 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nairobi View Post
The only reason I exclude northern Mississippi and the northern Delta is because nowadays they tend to refer to themselves as the Mid-South, for whatever distinctions there may be. Southern Mississippi and northern Mississippi are different places nowadays.
I know about the whole Mid-South moniker; I just consider it a section of the Deep South, like the Gulf Coast is. All of Mississippi is Deep South to me.

Quote:
I know we disagree about the inclusion of certain parts of the Carolinas.
Mostly eastern NC. It fits though, pretty much in every respect.
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Old 02-12-2014, 06:46 PM
 
Location: Round Rock, Texas
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Texas is not a "southern" city, IMO. Texas is a "whole other country", with parts of the deep South, the Great Plains, The Midwest, the Southwest, and Mexico thrown in.
Not to mention the Texas Pride is somewhat unique, and has a blend of cultures that is unlike the Old South.
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Old 02-12-2014, 11:11 PM
 
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To be honest, Texas isn't southern at all, at least in the way American thinks as "southern." True, it was a Confederate State, but Texas is Texas. It's in it's own league, and I'm sure many Texans would like to think of their state that way. Also, Eastern NC is just as southern as the Deep South. The rest of the state is Upper South like Tennessee to the west and Virginia to the north, but Eastern NC feels A LOT more southern. You'll find old plantations in this area, farmland like you'll find in the Mississippi Delta, and fantastic southern food i.e. Eastern NC BBQ. The Carolinas, Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, and Tennessee are a lot more southern than Texas.
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Old 02-13-2014, 10:07 AM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JayJayCB View Post
To be honest, Texas isn't southern at all, at least in the way American thinks as "southern." True, it was a Confederate State, but Texas is Texas. It's in it's own league, and I'm sure many Texans would like to think of their state that way. Also, Eastern NC is just as southern as the Deep South. The rest of the state is Upper South like Tennessee to the west and Virginia to the north, but Eastern NC feels A LOT more southern. You'll find old plantations in this area, farmland like you'll find in the Mississippi Delta, and fantastic southern food i.e. Eastern NC BBQ. The Carolinas, Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, and Tennessee are a lot more southern than Texas.
Well East Texas is those states that you mentioned like Tennessee and Georgia.
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Old 02-25-2014, 09:49 AM
 
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17. Delaware- Not Southern at all, way too close to Pennsylvania (Philadelphia area) and New Jersey.

16. Maryland- Same neighborhood as Delaware, might have a little southern influence in the rural areas but overall not southern, especially the DC and Baltimore areas.

15. West Virginia- Didn't join the Confederacy, has more ties to Ohio and Pennsylvania.

14. Oklahoma- Too much of a "western" and mid-western feel, due to bordering Kansas to the north and Texas to the south.

13. Missouri- You can find some Southern aspects in Southern Missouri (definitely SE Missouri) but overall mid-western. Might have been considered southern in the past (A bit like Maryland below the Mason-Dixon line), also considered southern in "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn" if I'm not mistaken but definitely a mid-western state today.

12. Kentucky- Upper South that never joined the Confederacy, also draws on the influences of the mid-western states bordering to the north. However, still pretty "Southern" and "country" in most areas.

11. Texas- East Texas does have Southern aspects, but the rest of the state feels has much more of a Western/Tex-Mex/Southwestern feel.

10. Florida- Northern Florida is a bit Deep South, definitely the counties bordering Georgia and Alabama. Rest of the state has lost southern aspects throughout the years.

9. Virginia- Upper South state that is historically very Southern (Look at the Civil War) and still Southern in most areas, but NOVA isn't too southern anymore due to the close proximity to DC and all the transplants. As soon as you pass Richmond and head north, it gets less and less southern until you hit the DC suburbs.

8. Arkansas- Upper South but also contains other influences that are not necessarily "southern", due to bordering Missouri, Oklahoma, and Texas.

7. Tennessee- Upper South that joined the CSA after Ft. Sumter but always and still is very southern. For ex, country music, moon pies, Dollywood, etc.

6. North Carolina- Upper South that is very similar to Tennessee in joining the CSA after Ft. Sumter. However, very southern and the birthplace of NASCAR, moonshine, pork BBQ, Andy Griffith Show, etc.

5. Louisiana- Deep South in the northern part of the state (check out Duck Dynasty) but also contains aspects around New Orleans (Cajun influence) that are not as similar to the rest of the Deep South. However, still very southern.

4. South Carolina- Deep South and the first state to leave the Union, extremely southern throughout and in the Plantation/antebellum way along the coast. Visit the Charleston area sometime.

3. Georgia- Deep South that does contain many transplants in the Atlanta area, but still very southern. Check out Gone With The Wind, The Dukes of Hazzard, Stone Mountain, etc. Nicknamed "The Empire State of the South."

2. Alabama- "Heart of Dixie", very much a Deep South state that doesn't need much explanation. Very few transplants and the site of many historically southern moments such as a good portion of events during the Civil Rights Movement.

1. Mississippi- The most "Deep South" state, EXTREMELY southern and rural throughout. Doesn't contain many transplants or large cities. Read some William Faulkner novels, listen to Jerry Clowers comedies, and watch "O Brother, Where Art Thou?" and "Mississippi Burning."
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Old 02-25-2014, 08:51 PM
 
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Quote:
=JayJayCB;33450940]To be honest, Texas isn't southern at all, at least in the way American thinks as "southern."
What Americans "think" (however defined, particularly those who have never been to Texas) can be easily countered by those -- apparently such as yourself (and I hasten to add that I mean this in no note of disrespect/sarcasm -- who think of it as "Western"...based on old Hollywood westerns (which I love), but have little to do with the true history and culture of the state (those early ones were not even filmed in Texas at all, but in southern California and Arizona).

Quote:
True, it was a Confederate State, but Texas is Texas. It's in it's own league, and I'm sure many Texans would like to think of their state that way.
Yes, it is and you are correct in that -- for lots of reasons -- Texas is in its own class. But? How many other states in the traditional South don't feel the same way about theirs? ESPECIALLY ones like South Carolina and Virginia who have a deep colonial history as well.

Quote:
Also, Eastern NC is just as southern as the Deep South. The rest of the state is Upper South like Tennessee to the west and Virginia to the north, but Eastern NC feels A LOT more southern. You'll find old plantations in this area, farmland like you'll find in the Mississippi Delta, and fantastic southern food i.e. Eastern NC BBQ.
And? In what you describe about eastern North Carolina, can you be specific as to what East Texas lacks by the same criteria you use? I would really like to hear your answer on that one

Quote:
The Carolinas, Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, and Tennessee are a lot more southern than Texas.
As a whole, that is probably true but, especially when it comes to NORTH Carolina (and I totally agree it is a Southern state), you are getting on verrrry shaky ground. I know kin and friends in the Deep South -- particularly Mississippi and Alabama -- which are my ancestral homes (I am a fourth generation Texan) -- who do not consider North Carolina a "true Southern state." (hell, I even know a few who actually have serious questions about Louisiana, believe it or not!).

*Ahem* I don't agree with the latter part of the above at all... but I am giving a friendly reminder that anyone outside of the generally considered "Deep South" states (the peripheral South states) ought to be very cautious in being so smugly positive about excluding Texas from the South...especially when it is obvious most who do have 1). never been to Texas; 2.) are not specific beyond the standard "it is western", without explaining just exactly what they mean by it, and 3.) and, as regards, the "Southern" label, do not really explain what they mean by "Southern" (beyond the -- it seems -- the "taken for granted" foundation of some -- that the "southeast" and or "Old South" classic -- is synonymous with "The South."

So now then Jay-Jay, a few questions to you (and please keep in mind, this is just a friendly, civil, discussion/debate; nothing at all intended as anything but...)

First? Have you ever been to East Texas? Which you said earlier has a "few" Southern characteristic? Well, regardless....how is "Eastern North Carolina" more "Deep South" than East Texas? Please be specific..

Second? How is North Carolina -- as a whole -- more "Southern" than Texas? Yes, I grant that NC is located in the far southeast -- but I am talking in terms of things like history, religious patterns, linguistics, idiom and slang -- general culture and traditions, and yes, even "Confederate history". As to this one, Texas was far, far, more a "Confederate state" in both sentiment and history, than was North Carolina. Texas was one of the original Confederate states and the second to last to be re-admitted to the Union. On the other hand? North Carolina rejected secession until after Ft. Sumter and was one of the first states to be re-admitted. I don't say that out of any sense of "gotcha"...but just that the Confederate and Reconstruction experience is a strong one, and not to be easily dismissed as "oh yeah...". And finally? -- although there are many more -- self-identification with a region
among the natives of the said state (i.e. those within who say they live in the South and consider themselves to be Southerners).

Third? Texas is western, you say? Sure it is...in the sense it has a strong post-bellum settlement element and thus, a frontier quality that doesn't exist much in the states to the east -- but the true identification with a region is what other states make up that region, so can you list the traits that make Texas more affiliated with the Rocky Mountain or interior southwest states (i.e. New Mexico and Arizona, mainly)? If so, please do. Sure Texas is western, so is Kansas...but is it not still not a Midwestern state..? North Carolina is "eastern"...does that mean it has more in common with Maryland and Delaware than with Georgia or Alabama..."

Ok, I have rambled enough! LOL Once again, not a bit of hostility intended!
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