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Old 04-15-2010, 10:41 AM
 
2,250 posts, read 1,788,647 times
Reputation: 1160
Quote:
Originally Posted by mike0421 View Post
Unbelivably, these two posted maps of Boston and Atlanta are at the same exact scale (1:622000). That's pretty incredible to consider, and it also magnifies how small New England is, scale-wise, compared to the rest of the country. In fact, every map I made is at 1:622000, with the exception of the second Boston map, and the Miami map, which was at 1:585000, slightly smaller, but done in portrait instead of landscape, to depict the unique vertical nature of population dispersion there.

The density classification was different for NY and Boston, because they are much more unique in settlement than the rest of the country. That said, I'll make one overall post, and have the entire setting at 1:622000, and, with 10k being the highest break on density. Is that agreeable, or did you want something different?
Thank you that be great!
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Old 04-15-2010, 10:56 AM
 
Location: Underneath the Pecan Tree
15,832 posts, read 18,908,172 times
Reputation: 6647
Quote:
Originally Posted by mike0421 View Post
It is. I can adjust Philly to 10k, or make all the others 5k as well. I think you guys need to get consensus, then I'll do a one-off project. Since the files are all saved, it won't take that long to make them all one density classification.
You should start charging these people lol
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Old 04-15-2010, 11:51 AM
 
Location: New England & The Maritimes
2,118 posts, read 2,322,179 times
Reputation: 1114
Just read basically this whole thread and mike0421, you are the man. You have also landed the coolest job ever, congrats.
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Old 04-15-2010, 11:54 AM
 
Location: 38į 38' 45" N, -90į 20' 08" W
7,646 posts, read 10,942,325 times
Reputation: 6167
Quote:
Originally Posted by chiatldal View Post
Thank you that be great!
There is a problem with me uploading DC and Atlanta again, the attachments will not allow duplicate files. They were duplicated earlier with the standardized classification.

NYC
Is there a best way to determine comparative city population-nyc.jpg

Boston
Is there a best way to determine comparative city population-boston.jpg

Philadelphia
Is there a best way to determine comparative city population-philly.jpg

Chicago
Is there a best way to determine comparative city population-chicago.jpg

Dallas/Ft Worth
Is there a best way to determine comparative city population-dfw.jpg

Houston
Is there a best way to determine comparative city population-houston.jpg

Denver
Is there a best way to determine comparative city population-denver.jpg

Miami
Is there a best way to determine comparative city population-miami.jpg

Charlotte
Is there a best way to determine comparative city population-charlotte.jpg

Kansas City
Is there a best way to determine comparative city population-kc.jpg

St. Louis
Is there a best way to determine comparative city population-stl.jpg

Los Angeles
Is there a best way to determine comparative city population-la.jpg

San Francisco
Is there a best way to determine comparative city population-sf.jpg

Metros with zip codes of 10k per square mile and over:
NYC: 221
LA: 115
Chicago: 46
Boston: 37
San Francisco: 37
Philadelphia: 36
DC: 17
Miami: 13
Denver 4: (includes one in Boulder)
Houston: 2
Dallas: 2
St. Louis, Kansas City, Charlotte and Atlanta have zero with over 10k population density.
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Old 04-15-2010, 12:50 PM
 
4,441 posts, read 4,616,064 times
Reputation: 1080
Quote:
Originally Posted by mike0421 View Post
There is a problem with me uploading DC and Atlanta again, the attachments will not allow duplicate files. They were duplicated earlier with the standardized classification.

NYC
Attachment 61356

Boston
Attachment 61357

Philadelphia
Attachment 61358

Chicago
Attachment 61359

Dallas/Ft Worth
Attachment 61360

Houston
Attachment 61369

Denver
Attachment 61361

Miami
Attachment 61362

Charlotte
Attachment 61363

Kansas City
Attachment 61364

St. Louis
Attachment 61365

Los Angeles
Attachment 61366

San Francisco
Attachment 61367

Metros with zip codes of 10k per square mile and over:
NYC: 221
LA: 115
Chicago: 46
Boston: 37
San Francisco: 37
Philadelphia: 36
DC: 17
Miami: 13
Denver 4: (includes one in Boulder)
Houston: 2
Dallas: 2
St. Louis, Kansas City, Charlotte and Atlanta have zero with over 10k population density.
Charlotte seems so out of its league compared to some of these other cities. But I believe the gauge of 5k may be a little bit better. Perhaps a different level of urbanity could be gauged. I'll come up with classifications later. I have to get back to wonderful college work!
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Old 04-15-2010, 12:54 PM
 
511 posts, read 734,952 times
Reputation: 211
Quote:
Originally Posted by chiatldal View Post
No because the commuting population tells more of the story of what really going on. If the MSA is bigger, than the MSA is bigger! Sunbelt cities don't have bigger MSAs because it's nice, ) there population is outward. Again no major city is stilling from Philly if New York was really integrated in the same social commuting region as Philly, it would be the New York- Philadelphia Metroplex. There not enough social and economic integration to be one region. Atlanta is not cheating it's well noted especially by bashing on these threads Atlanta sprawls. The MSA is not misleading, the city limits population is! because the city limit size does not represent the way metro is built.
Exactly!
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Old 04-15-2010, 12:54 PM
 
Location: 38į 38' 45" N, -90į 20' 08" W
7,646 posts, read 10,942,325 times
Reputation: 6167
Quote:
Originally Posted by adavi215 View Post
Charlotte seems so out of its league compared to some of these other cities. But I believe the gauge of 5k may be a little bit better. Perhaps a different level of urbanity could be gauged. I'll come up with classifications later. I have to get back to wonderful college work!
I don't think you say that with any degree of malice or derogatory intent, it's just a different type of city. You notice the light green also creeps out further than some of the other maps.

When you see a settlement like Charlotte, to me, that's more indicative of an MSA that is more inclined to accommodate nuclear, 4 person families than some of the others. People who desire bigger, single family homes with a bigger yard to play in. But, who knows, I might be completely talking out of my ass.
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Old 04-15-2010, 12:58 PM
 
4,441 posts, read 4,616,064 times
Reputation: 1080
Quote:
Originally Posted by mike0421 View Post
I don't think you say that with any degree of malice or derogatory intent, it's just a different type of city. You notice the light green also creeps out further than some of the other maps.

When you see a settlement like Charlotte, to me, that's more indicative of an MSA that is more inclined to accommodate nuclear, 4 person families than some of the others. People who desire bigger, single family homes with a bigger yard to play in. But, who knows, I might be completely talking out of my ass.
You're right. I actually reside proudly in Charlotte and you would be correct. That is the goal and appearance of Charlotte. Charlotte is a different type of city that is finally catching on to better development strategies. We are now implementing transit oriented design.
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Old 04-15-2010, 01:23 PM
 
2,250 posts, read 1,788,647 times
Reputation: 1160
Quote:
Originally Posted by mike0421 View Post
There is a problem with me uploading DC and Atlanta again, the attachments will not allow duplicate files. They were duplicated earlier with the standardized classification.
Again I have to thank you.

It still proves my point. Iím going use DFW instead of Atlanta because it's a metroplex. You can see Boston CSA but at the same time you can depict Boston MSA from the others MSA. On the Dallas map you can see clearly itís one large concentrated MSA with Fort Worth. If were determining a comparative city population the area covering DFW would have to be a lot larger than Boston. Just cause the area outside of Boston is dense doesnít make it one MSA. So it kills me when posters from the northeast say if are MSA was the size of sunbelt MSAs because Northeast cities arenít as sprawl or have the commuting ties to even suggest it.




Last edited by chiatldal; 04-15-2010 at 01:32 PM..
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Old 04-15-2010, 02:42 PM
 
Location: S„o Paulo
6,270 posts, read 7,311,388 times
Reputation: 3624
Quote:
Originally Posted by chiatldal View Post
Again I have to thank you.

It still proves my point. Iím going use DFW instead of Atlanta because it's a metroplex. You can see Boston CSA but at the same time you can depict Boston MSA from the others MSA. On the Dallas map you can see clearly itís one large concentrated MSA with Fort Worth. If were determining a comparative city population the area covering DFW would have to be a lot larger than Boston. Just cause the area outside of Boston is dense doesnít make it one MSA. So it kills me when posters from the northeast say if are MSA was the size of sunbelt MSAs because Northeast cities arenít as sprawl or have the commuting ties to even suggest it.

But you should know that MSAs aren't decided by the land area, etc, etc...they're determined by commuting patterns. Boston's development style is just different than that of Dallas and others. Here's a look at our commuter rail maps.




As you can see from Matt's maps (good name for your future company, eh Matt?), our density drops off and then picks up in satellite cities like Worcester, Providence, Lowell, and Lawrence...all of which have direct rail connections to the city.

Boston has a very unique style of development, which can probably be attributed to its age. So while obviously people work in these satellite cities and the 128 tech belt, there are plenty of people taking the train into the city every single day to work.
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