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Old 01-11-2011, 06:42 AM
 
3 posts, read 11,348 times
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Hi,
New to the forum here but been in NC all my life. I am looking for a little help from someone who has either been in the same situation or either has more expierience in the homebuilding / site preparation fields. I have access to some land for my wife and I to potentially build on. This is currently used as farm land and we would like to put a house here oneday.(Interested in modular homes as of now)

I have been doing research on soil types to see if its worthy of having a perc test performed and I am a little unsure.

The two soil types in the vacinity show "Goldsboro Sandy Loam" & "Bibb Loam". By reading on different sites I find that:

Goldsboro Sandy Loam - Drainage Class (Agricultural): Moderately well drained

Bibb Loam - The Bibb series consists of very deep, poorly drained, moderately permeable soils

Attached is a Geo map of the area and where i have the Red box is somewhere in the area of that field we would like to build on.

Can someone give me some feedback or opinions on this area selected?
There is a single wide mobile home/trailer that i see is in the "bibb loam" area and I have noticed they have a very high hill in there yard for there septic system.

Any feedback / comments will be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,
Ryan
Attached Thumbnails
Land Perk - Wilson/Green County-land-soil-types.jpg  
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Old 01-11-2011, 08:04 PM
 
236 posts, read 1,369,762 times
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Call your county environmental people out to do a soil test. I think you may have to pay the application fee to get them out. It will run a couple hundred dollars depending on the county you are in. The other option is to hire a soil scientist which normally is much more expensive. Goldsboro soil normally will perk for traditional systems. I would think that the worst case scenario would be that you may have to build a mound type system which would most likely double the cost. They test the soil by taking a core soil sample and look at the colors of the various layers which indicate where the normal saturation point is. If one particular spot is deemed unsuitable you can have them test the next most appropriate area. The area must not not be manipulated ( meaning you can't build a big mound of dirt for them to test), clean of all trees and thick brush before it can be tested by the county. Lastly, if the area has a tendency to be wet at certain parts of the year, as most of Eastern NC is I would recommend having it tested during a dry time of the year. Hope that helps. Good luck
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Old 01-12-2011, 05:05 AM
 
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Thanks a lot for your input!! I am just trying to get all the information i can before having tested. Your info was helpful!

If building the mound type system, is it more expensive b/c of the dirt you have to haul in to build it up?
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Old 01-12-2011, 11:49 AM
 
236 posts, read 1,369,762 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ryanc750 View Post
Thanks a lot for your input!! I am just trying to get all the information i can before having tested. Your info was helpful!

If building the mound type system, is it more expensive b/c of the dirt you have to haul in to build it up?

I think the dirt needed but I also think there is more to them which requires more labor and material costs. Take care
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Old 01-13-2011, 12:16 PM
 
Location: Greenville, NC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ncguy444 View Post
Lastly, if the area has a tendency to be wet at certain parts of the year, as most of Eastern NC is I would recommend having it tested during a dry time of the year. Hope that helps. Good luck
This is probably the very reason Wilson County doesn't do perc tests. Municipalities should test at the wetest time of the year. I've seen counties refuse to do a perc test because the ground wasn't wet enough. If you only test when the ground is dry then the septic may and probably will fail to operate properly during the wet season. It's not a YOU verses the COUNTY issue. It's a desire to only install septic systems that will work whether the ground is wet or dry, around the calander.

You are literally splitting the lines with your home location. The county will want to know exactly where the house will be situated by means of a site sketch as well as an inspection of the property with the home location flagged out.
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Old 01-13-2011, 08:18 PM
 
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Thanks Richard Martin, and I'm assuming the further away from the Bibb Loam line, the better off I will be, correct?

I would go out and flag the area that i would plan to have a house located on. What determines where the septic system will be located? Or is that a personal preference? IE-Front yard, Back yard, Side of house, etc.
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Old 01-14-2011, 12:20 AM
 
Location: Greenville, NC
2,078 posts, read 5,038,178 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ryanc750 View Post
Thanks Richard Martin, and I'm assuming the further away from the Bibb Loam line, the better off I will be, correct?

I would go out and flag the area that i would plan to have a house located on. What determines where the septic system will be located? Or is that a personal preference? IE-Front yard, Back yard, Side of house, etc.
I wouldn't bother doing anything until you contact the county first and see exactly what they require. Usually the county tells you where the septic system will go. I've seen them require a 3 ft tall mound system in a front yard before.
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Old 01-15-2011, 08:10 AM
 
236 posts, read 1,369,762 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Martin View Post
This is probably the very reason Wilson County doesn't do perc tests. Municipalities should test at the wetest time of the year. I've seen counties refuse to do a perc test because the ground wasn't wet enough. If you only test when the ground is dry then the septic may and probably will fail to operate properly during the wet season. It's not a YOU verses the COUNTY issue. It's a desire to only install septic systems that will work whether the ground is wet or dry, around the calander.

You are literally splitting the lines with your home location. The county will want to know exactly where the house will be situated by means of a site sketch as well as an inspection of the property with the home location flagged out.

If Wilson county doesnt do perk tests who does? Do they have a soil scientist come in who is on a list the county has of certain professionals to work with?
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Old 01-16-2011, 02:02 PM
 
Location: Greenville, NC
2,078 posts, read 5,038,178 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ncguy444 View Post
If Wilson county doesnt do perk tests who does? Do they have a soil scientist come in who is on a list the county has of certain professionals to work with?
Site Evaluations

Sites are evaluated for their suitability to dispose of sewage in a safe and sanitary manner. The evaluation is based on the soil quality, topography of the land, and its intended use. On-site sewage disposal systems are designed, inspected, and monitored, and permits are issued or denied according to State law.

Perc Tests

Environmental Health does not do perc tests, which were eliminated in the 1970s as the way of determining suitability for a septic tank system.

Wilson County, NC - Official Website - On-Site Wastewater
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Old 12-10-2011, 06:37 PM
 
Location: Berkeley County
575 posts, read 517,356 times
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What other options are there in rural areas if not a septic tank and leech bed?
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