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Old 03-16-2011, 01:59 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by QuilterChick View Post
You've got a better chance of hurricane damage along the east coast than any sunami. The prophets of doom and gloom love this kind of "publicity". Geesh !
Where would local news be without "thing happens elsewhere: could it happen here?" articles.
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Old 03-16-2011, 02:03 PM
 
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Yeh, IIRC a tsunami doesn't stop at the normal line (lets say for a 6ft wave) because it has A LOT more energy. So it will carry that 6ft wave deep into the coastline.
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Old 03-17-2011, 01:52 AM
 
Location: Greenville, NC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NorasMom View Post
What about the Southport plant is any safer than the one in Japan, I guess is what I'm wondering...anyone know?
There are 2 of the same GE Mark 1 reactors at Southport. There are also a couple of them at Peach Bottom in southern PA.

Bear in mind that there is risk regardless of the type of reactor or where it's placed.

All 3 of the biggest nuclear accidents occurred because of human error. At Fukushima this could have been avoided if the backup generators were mounted higher up off of the ground. It was an engineering and scientific error. The engineers that designed the plant believed the scientists that said the seawall was high enough to handle ANY tsunami that may occur.
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Old 03-17-2011, 08:01 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Hitchcock View Post
The omitted sentence before the above quote is, "The good news is that the odds of any sizable wave hitting our shores are slim."
This thread should be moved to the South Carolina forum because the article was written by a Myrtle Beach newspaper with the focus on the grand strand

Scientist: Myrtle Beach area tsunami likely not in the cards
Read more: Scientist: Myrtle Beach area tsunami likely not in the cards - Local - TheSunNews.com
A portion of the article discusses the possible impacts of a earthquake or tsunami on the Progress Energy's nuclear power plant in Brunswick County, N.C.

As for a tsunami impact (worst case scenario) originating from an earthquake in the Puerto Rico trench, I would not image the risks are much different for the NE part of South Carolina or the SE part of NC. Both are over 1,000 miles from PR.

PR trench http://www.whoi.edu/cms/images/media...Map_w_6751.jpg
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Old 03-17-2011, 11:05 AM
 
Location: Eastern NC
19,561 posts, read 17,809,660 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Time2Travel View Post
Ok dumb question. Isn't a six foot tsunami the extact same thing as a series of six foot waves? That happens dozens of times a year already when the wind is blowing above 25 knots from the northeast. Most of the coastal population refers to such conditions as "good surf". Leave it to a newspaper to scare the tourists with the word "tsunami".



Common sense has become an endangered species.
A Tsunami is not a six foot wave, it is a six foot rise of water and that six foot rise can move at very fast speeds. Look at how the tsunami in Japan moved. It started as a small wave that quickly grew to be almost 40 feet.
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Old 03-17-2011, 12:31 PM
 
Location: North Carolina
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Quote:
Originally Posted by trlhiker View Post
A Tsunami is not a six foot wave, it is a six foot rise of water and that six foot rise can move at very fast speeds. Look at how the tsunami in Japan moved. It started as a small wave that quickly grew to be almost 40 feet.
I must admit that I am operating under the assumption that a six foot tsumani will in fact produce a six foot tall wave of water. I'm no expert on wave speed but six foot tall is six foot tall which means a lot of homes on the coast are going to have wet lawns if one hits since 99% of the homes built in the federal flood zone are built on 8 foot tall pilings designed to withstand the velocity effect of ocean waves. I'm not trying to downplay the destructive force of a tsumani but rather to poke fun at the utterly microscopic probability that one will hit the NC/SC coastline.
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Old 05-06-2011, 09:14 PM
 
Location: West Coast
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CBLiving View Post
..."scientists who study earthquakes and tsunamis say the most likely worst-case scenario for the Grand Strand would be a 9.0 quake in the Puerto Rico Trench, a 500-mile long undersea gash in the earth that lies southeast of us... If that were to happen, northeastern South Carolina would likely see a 6-foot
6 foot Tsunami ...

How about a 272 foot tall Tsunami ?

272 Foot Tall Tsunami - World Record Hemlock

Sort of has an interesting story behind the name.

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Old 05-07-2011, 08:59 AM
LLN
 
Location: Upstairs closet
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If you care about reality and science, there is a great presentation on the NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE WILMINGTON site which addresses Tsunami's in NC. I feel sure the article mentioned, if accurate used info from that site. The presentation debunks some myths about Tsunamis on east coast and puts a more realistic focus on the threat.
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Old 05-09-2011, 06:04 PM
 
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It should be an interesting day if the Bogue Banks barrier island (Atlantic Beach, Emerald Isle) ever needs to be evacuated with little warning during the summer tourist season.
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Old 05-10-2011, 05:52 AM
 
Location: Long Island NY
470 posts, read 489,015 times
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9.0 quake? Isn't that one of the largest ever recorded?
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