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Old 03-15-2011, 08:32 PM
 
43 posts, read 131,618 times
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..."scientists who study earthquakes and tsunamis say the most likely worst-case scenario for the Grand Strand would be a 9.0 quake in the Puerto Rico Trench, a 500-mile long undersea gash in the earth that lies southeast of us... If that were to happen, northeastern South Carolina would likely see a 6-foot tsunami within four to five hours."

Carolina Beach Today: Worst Case Scenario, Pleasure Island, NC Could See 6 Foot Tsunami
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Old 03-16-2011, 02:33 AM
 
Location: Greenville, NC
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Would those be the same kind of "experts" that said the seawall at Fukushima would be high enough?
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Old 03-16-2011, 05:55 AM
 
Location: Morehead City, NC
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The omitted sentence before the above quote is, "The good news is that the odds of any sizable wave hitting our shores are slim."
This thread should be moved to the South Carolina forum because the article was written by a Myrtle Beach newspaper with the focus on the grand strand

Scientist: Myrtle Beach area tsunami likely not in the cards
Read more: Scientist: Myrtle Beach area tsunami likely not in the cards - Local - TheSunNews.com
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Old 03-16-2011, 09:28 AM
 
Location: Newport, NC
956 posts, read 3,591,953 times
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practically speaking, the worst case scenario is never the worst case. I sure do enjoy visiting North Carolina beaches, but I'm being very cautious about buying a retirement home anywhere near the shore for that very reason.
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Old 03-16-2011, 09:44 AM
 
Location: Blue Ridge Mntns., NC
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You've got a better chance of hurricane damage along the east coast than any sunami. The prophets of doom and gloom love this kind of "publicity". Geesh !
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Old 03-16-2011, 12:50 PM
 
Location: Durm
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Ok, but that leads me to my question - how safe is the coastal nuclear plant in Southport really, given what's going on in Japan right now? I really have no idea whether it is or it isn't (whether the US needs to look at safety more closely in general).

...but as I'm planning to move to Wilmington soon, it's on my mind at the moment...

What about the Southport plant is any safer than the one in Japan, I guess is what I'm wondering...anyone know?
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Old 03-16-2011, 12:54 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NorasMom View Post
What about the Southport plant is any safer than the one in Japan, I guess is what I'm wondering...anyone know?
it isn't located on a known fault line.
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Old 03-16-2011, 12:55 PM
 
22,769 posts, read 26,212,348 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CBLiving View Post
..."scientists who study earthquakes and tsunamis say the most likely worst-case scenario for the Grand Strand would be a 9.0 quake in the Puerto Rico Trench, a 500-mile long undersea gash in the earth that lies southeast of us... If that were to happen, northeastern South Carolina would likely see a 6-foot tsunami within four to five hours."

Carolina Beach Today: Worst Case Scenario, Pleasure Island, NC Could See 6 Foot Tsunami
Very interesting that the writers of "Carolina Beach Today" use Carolina Beach and Myrtle Beach interchangably, despite the fact that they are in two different locations.

In any event -- having a 6 foot tsunami within 4 or 5 hours warning is very different from Japan, where they saw a 40-foot tsunami within an hour warning.
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Old 03-16-2011, 01:22 PM
 
Location: North Carolina
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CBLiving View Post
..."scientists who study earthquakes and tsunamis say the most likely worst-case scenario for the Grand Strand would be a 9.0 quake in the Puerto Rico Trench, a 500-mile long undersea gash in the earth that lies southeast of us... If that were to happen, northeastern South Carolina would likely see a 6-foot tsunami within four to five hours."

Carolina Beach Today: Worst Case Scenario, Pleasure Island, NC Could See 6 Foot Tsunami
Ok dumb question. Isn't a six foot tsunami the extact same thing as a series of six foot waves? That happens dozens of times a year already when the wind is blowing above 25 knots from the northeast. Most of the coastal population refers to such conditions as "good surf". Leave it to a newspaper to scare the tourists with the word "tsunami".



Common sense has become an endangered species.
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Old 03-16-2011, 01:37 PM
 
Location: Durm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Time2Travel View Post
Ok dumb question. Isn't a six foot tsunami the extact same thing as a series of six foot waves? That happens dozens of times a year already when the wind is blowing above 25 knots from the northeast. Most of the coastal population refers to such conditions as "good surf". Leave it to a newspaper to scare the tourists with the word "tsunami".



Common sense has become an endangered species.
It's different in that the power doesn't come from wind, it comes from the bottom. It's much more powerful because it's the full force of the water. So it just keeps going, and going, and going...

(I think...correct me if I'm wrong, someone)

But that's why before a tsunami you'll see the water empty out, which you wouldn't see with a series of 6-foot waves.
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