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Old 04-11-2011, 06:16 PM
 
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What are folks favorite seafood places that have Fried clams with bellies? Thank you.
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Old 04-11-2011, 08:16 PM
 
Location: Western NC
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I think they are a New England thing ... Fried clams w/o bellies are not clams, they are necks. Yuck. Try the Swan River Seafood Co. in West Dennis MA, or Quito's in Bristol RI.

If there are any in coastal NC, I need to know pronto.
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Old 04-12-2011, 06:54 AM
 
Location: Morehead City, NC
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Fried Clams with Bellies is very much a New England thing that uses a diferent species of clam that is commonly found along the NC coast.
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Old 04-12-2011, 07:26 AM
 
Location: Western NC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Hitchcock View Post
Fried Clams with Bellies is very much a New England thing that uses a diferent species of clam that is commonly found along the NC coast.
Bill, how do our NC clams differ? One of these days I have to get out of the hills and over to the beach and sample some.
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Old 04-12-2011, 08:02 AM
 
Location: Morehead City, NC
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I am by no means a clam expert although I have clammed here in NC for personal consumption for decades. (Be sure to invest in a butter knife rake if you plan on doing any clamming)

The clam used for clam and bellies is a soft shelled clam that doesn't fit entirely into its own shell



North Carolina hard shell clam most commonly found here
http://www.samuelsandsonseafood.com/products/LN_photo.jpg (broken link)
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Old 04-12-2011, 10:47 AM
 
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Thanks,Quilterchick and Bill! You know I have heard from a few fishermen that the softshell clams ARE here in NC waters. But that they ship them up North due to higher demand and prices.
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Old 04-12-2011, 10:59 AM
 
Location: Morehead City, NC
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sandnsea2,
Please find out from your fishermen friends where to look for these soft shell clams here in NC. There is no fishery for any other type of clam beside the hard clam/Rangia clams here in NC that I'm aware of. I just looked in the Fisheries rule book and no mention of NC soft clams.
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Old 04-12-2011, 11:06 AM
 
Location: Western NC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Hitchcock View Post
I am by no means a clam expert although I have clammed here in NC for personal consumption for decades. (Be sure to invest in a butter knife rake if you plan on doing any clamming)

The clam used for clam and bellies is a soft shelled clam that doesn't fit entirely into its own shell



North Carolina hard shell clam most commonly found here
Okee dokee ... a little New England trivia about "clams".

The first link Bill are clams. They have the neck and are used for making fried clams, with bellies. Without bellies, they just use the neck and are not true fried clams. I believe Howard Johnsons (dating myself) would only do the "necks" and call them fried clams. Steamed clams in New England are just that, steamed in their own juice with a bit of crushed red pepper in the juice, and served with drawn butter.

The second link is what in New England are "Little Necks", they are small Quohaugs, and are served on ice, open and raw, and you have to acquire a taste for them ... and down them with a nice tangy tomato based seafood hot sauce. They are also served cooked/steamed open over linguine Fra Diavlo in Italian restaurants. But they are not clams. The larger Quohaugs are not as tender, and they are used chopped up in "clam chowder". And, another tidbit .... only in Rhode Island can you find "clam cakes". Like big hush puppies with chopped "clams" in them. Yum.

The terms have become interchangeable though.

Hope I've made you'all hungry now ... after this conversation, I need to make reservations for a flight to Cape Cod and then on to Maine for lobstah !!! omg.
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Old 04-12-2011, 11:51 AM
 
Location: Western NC
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Here's a good link to show clam cakes & how to prepare them. Usually made with the clams, but quahogs are more likely to be in them because the clams with the bellies are more expensive.

clam cakes? Definition? - General New England Archive - Chowhound
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Old 04-12-2011, 12:01 PM
 
Location: Where we enjoy all four seasons
20,505 posts, read 6,202,929 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by QuilterChick View Post
Okee dokee ... a little New England trivia about "clams".

The first link Bill are clams. They have the neck and are used for making fried clams, with bellies. Without bellies, they just use the neck and are not true fried clams. I believe Howard Johnsons (dating myself) would only do the "necks" and call them fried clams. Steamed clams in New England are just that, steamed in their own juice with a bit of crushed red pepper in the juice, and served with drawn butter.

The second link is what in New England are "Little Necks", they are small Quohaugs, and are served on ice, open and raw, and you have to acquire a taste for them ... and down them with a nice tangy tomato based seafood hot sauce. They are also served cooked/steamed open over linguine Fra Diavlo in Italian restaurants. But they are not clams. The larger Quohaugs are not as tender, and they are used chopped up in "clam chowder". And, another tidbit .... only in Rhode Island can you find "clam cakes". Like big hush puppies with chopped "clams" in them. Yum.

The terms have become interchangeable though.

Hope I've made you'all hungry now ... after this conversation, I need to make reservations for a flight to Cape Cod and then on to Maine for lobstah !!! omg.

Perfect post from a New Englander here. They are little quahogs and are great in chowder as that is what I use when I make it and I like to stuff them also...nothing like it.

I am laughing at Howard Johnsons..they were horrible weren't they..clam strips..tough as nails

I have to say that many won't be eating too many clams with bellies this year as they are predicting quite a red tide this year. Sad
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