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Old 09-08-2011, 06:11 AM
 
Location: Morehead City, NC
1,676 posts, read 5,363,131 times
Reputation: 1245

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So those turtle advocates in Sri Lanka are just wasting time huh? And yea the general idea is to harvest the eggs, let them hatch in the safety of captivity and then..........wait for it......

..........allow them to grow before release. Heavy predation occurs on the new born juvenile. Mortality decreases as the hatchling increase in size and age.

Last edited by Bill Hitchcock; 09-08-2011 at 07:00 AM..
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Old 09-08-2011, 11:26 AM
 
Location: Winston-Salem
700 posts, read 1,438,837 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Hitchcock View Post
So those turtle advocates in Sri Lanka are just wasting time huh? And yea the general idea is to harvest the eggs, let them hatch in the safety of captivity and then..........wait for it......

..........allow them to grow before release. Heavy predation occurs on the new born juvenile. Mortality decreases as the hatchling increase in size and age.
True ten years old they seem to reach a size in which they can better evade predators. Also, keep in mind that they follow migration routes and that can not be changed. Or the fact that if the females reach breeding age they will return to the beach that they were born. So this real does not impact the populations else where in the world. But, wait for it........ your point is somewhat true. As they are able to avoid beach predators. Crabs and birds.
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Old 09-09-2011, 01:32 PM
 
Location: Morehead City, NC
1,676 posts, read 5,363,131 times
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FISHERIES COMMISSION CHOOSES DATES TO OPEN PAMLICO, CORE SOUNDS TO
FLOUNDER GILL NETS

MOREHEAD CITY - The N.C. Marine Fisheries Commission voted Thursday to
open the fall flounder gill net fishery in Pamlico Sound Sept. 19 with
certain conditions.

The commission also voted to open the fall flounder gill net fishery in
southern Core Sound, Back Sound, The Straits and North River Oct. 1.

The Pamlico Sound Gill Net Restricted Area will initially open seven
days a week under the same regulations and permit requirements as
previous years. Under these regulations, the Pamlico Sound Gill Net
Restricted Area must close to all large-mesh gill nets for the remainder
of the fall fishing season if the fishery has interactions with three
live or two dead Kemp's ridley sea turtles.

However, if there is an interaction with a Kemp's ridley sea turtle,
N.C. Division of Marine Fisheries Director Louis Daniel will reduce the
fishing days to six. If there is a second interaction with a live Kemp's
ridley, the number of fishing days will be reduced to five. The
commission also authorized division Daniel to implement stricter
regulations, if needed.

Core Sound, Back Sound, The Straits and North River will open under
regulations established by a sea turtle lawsuit settlement. Under this
agreement, these waters must close to set large mesh gill nets for the
fall season if there is one interaction with either a live or a dead
Kemp's ridley.

By federal rule, all of Pamlico Sound closes to large-mesh gill net
fishing from Sept. 1 through Nov. 30 each year. The closure began in
1999 after several instances of fishery interactions with threatened and
endangered sea turtles. Fishermen typically use large-mesh gill nets to
target flounder.

Since 2000, the National Marine Fisheries Service has allowed a
highly-monitored, large-mesh gill net fishery during the closure in
limited areas of the sound under a series of Incidental Take Permits.
These permits, authorized under Section 10 of the federal Endangered
Species Act, allow for limited takes of threatened or endangered species
in an otherwise lawful activity.

North Carolina's latest Incidental Take Permit for the Pamlico Sound
Gill Net Restricted Area expired Dec. 31, but the National Marine
Fisheries Service recently agreed to allow the fishery for the fall of
2011 while it reviews the state's application for a new permit to
include all gill net fishing in internal coastal waters statewide. In
May 2010, the N.C. Division of Marine Fisheries submitted an application
for a statewide Incidental Take Permit to cover set gill nets statewide,
including the Pamlico Sound Gill Net Restricted Area. However, National
Marine Fisheries Service review of the application was delayed due to
the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico.

The division was notified Aug. 24 that the application was received and
deemed complete. The National Marine Fisheries Service intends to
publish a notice of receipt in the Federal Register in the coming weeks.
Core Sound, Back Sound, The Straits and North River closed to set large
mesh gill nets July 18, in accordance with a lawsuit settlement, after
division observers documented several interactions with sea turtles.

_-more-_

_-2-_

North Carolina's inshore large-mesh gill net fishery has operated under
a lawsuit settlement agreement between the state and the Karen Beasley
Sea Turtle Rescue and Rehabilitation Center since May 15, 2010. As part
of the agreement, the division is observing large-mesh gill net fishing
in inshore waters to track interactions with sea turtles.

The fall flounder fishery in the Pamlico Sound Gill Net Restricted Area
is exempt from the lawsuit settlement restrictions and operates under a
separate set of regulations.
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Old 09-09-2011, 01:34 PM
 
Location: Morehead City, NC
1,676 posts, read 5,363,131 times
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ADDITIONAL WATERS EXEMPTED FROM STRICTER REGULATIONS IN SEA TURTLE
LAWSUIT SETTLEMENT

MOREHEAD CITY - Gov. Bev Perdue has directed that fishermen setting
large-mesh gill nets in portions of Albemarle, Croatan and Roanoke
sounds and portions of the Neuse, Pamlico and Bay rivers, will soon be
under the same regulations as they were prior to a sea turtle lawsuit
settlement agreement.

The N.C. Division of Marine Fisheries issued proclamations this week to
conditionally exempt these waters from stricter regulations that have
been in place since May 2010. The new regulations take effect Monday.

This is another example of Perdue's efforts to ease regulations on
businesses and residents in North Carolina to make it easier to get back
to work. These less stringent regulations should aid fishermen in their
efforts to return to business as usual after Hurricane Irene.

The changes are the result of an agreement between the division, the
N.C. Marine Fisheries Commission and the Karen Beasley Sea Turtle Rescue
and Rehabilitation Center to modify the lawsuit settlement based on data
from Division of Marine Fisheries gill net observer coverage, said
division Director Louis Daniel.

"We have more than a year's worth of data from our observer coverage,
and there has not been one record of a commercial fishing-related
interaction with a sea turtle in these waters," Daniel said.

If sea turtles are observed in these newly exempted areas, then the
stricter regulations will go back in place for the remainder of the
season.

The new exempted areas include waters of Albemarle, Croatan and Roanoke
sounds north of the Virginia Dare Memorial Bridge and the Washington
Baum Bridge. Also exempted are waters of the Pamlico River upstream of
Currituck Point and Fulford Point, waters of the Bay River upstream of
Bay Point and Maw Point, and waters of the Neuse River upstream of a
line from Maw Point to the mouth of South River.

All other coastal waters of the state not specifically exempted under
the settlement agreement remain under regulations adopted by the Marine
Fisheries Commission in May 2010. Those regulations prohibited fishermen
from setting gill nets between 4-inches and 6 ˝-inches stretched mesh
in the daytime and on weekends in most waters of the state. They also
prohibit setting nets of more than 15 meshes in height, along with other
gear restrictions.

For specific coordinates and regulations, see Proclamations M-27-2011
and M-28-2011 at NCDENR - Proclamations [1].
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Old 09-09-2011, 02:02 PM
 
Location: The 12th State
22,974 posts, read 58,659,860 times
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Whatever happen to fishing with poles. Turtles and Flounders can both roam freely.
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Old 09-09-2011, 03:11 PM
 
Location: Morehead City, NC
1,676 posts, read 5,363,131 times
Reputation: 1245
I posted the above news releases from the NC Division of Marine Fisheries to give a slight view of the inner workings of fisheries management. It's a complex process with an interesting marriage of politicians comm/rec fishermen, scientist, managers, biologist, town officials, universities, trade groups, public meetings, public input and on and on and on.
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Old 09-09-2011, 03:13 PM
LLN
 
Location: Upstairs closet
4,981 posts, read 8,763,970 times
Reputation: 6451
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Hitchcock View Post
I posted the above news releases from the NC Division of Marine Fisheries to give a slight view of the inner workings of fisheries management. It's a complex process with an interesting marriage of politicians comm/rec fishermen, scientist, managers, biologist, town officials, universities, trade groups, public meetings, public input and on and on and on.
And this opinion from the guy that harps on agendas and facts. C'mon man. Yeah the DMF is a well oiled machine.
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Old 09-09-2011, 03:23 PM
 
Location: North Carolina
572 posts, read 1,409,961 times
Reputation: 490
Quote:
Originally Posted by SunnyKayak View Post
Whatever happen to fishing with poles. Turtles and Flounders can both roam freely.
Flounder can be caught using a fishing line but it's not practical for commercial fishing. However if no nets were used for fishing nobody would ever eat shrimp. Can't catch those little critters using a fishing pole.


Bill, maybe you can answer a question for me. If it's illegal to capture a sea turtle how does the turtle place at Topsail legally possess them? Are they issued some kind of special permit?
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Old 09-09-2011, 04:17 PM
 
Location: Winston-Salem
700 posts, read 1,438,837 times
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There are quite a few sea turtles in captivity around the world. Some of them are there due to being injured so they couldn’t reasonably survive in the wild. Others are there for observation as well as to help them increase the numbers for their species.
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Old 09-09-2011, 04:39 PM
 
Location: North Carolina
572 posts, read 1,409,961 times
Reputation: 490
Quote:
Originally Posted by Since72 View Post
There are quite a few sea turtles in captivity around the world. Some of them are there due to being injured so they couldn’t reasonably survive in the wild. Others are there for observation as well as to help them increase the numbers for their species.
I am familiar with this. Some folks call them turtle farms.


Still doesn't explain how the turtle place at Topsail can keep a captive sea turtle. It's clearly illegal so I assume they have some sort of permit. Otherwise I imagine the Dept of Wildlife would roll in there and write tickets. I'm not complaining about the turtle place at Topsail, just curious how they can operate. If I pick up a sea turtle (injured or healthy) I'm sure I'm in deep trouble.
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