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Old 09-15-2011, 09:08 PM
 
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North Carolina has grown substantially within the past 10 years both economically and through its number of inhabitants.Moreover, there has been some growth in the Wilmington-Wrightsville Beach area and during the late Spring to Summer tourist season, overall there still is not that year-round, robust growth that the Piedmont region has experienced. Today, the answer still remains unresolved on why the coastal region, both the inner and outer banks, with its lush topography and abundant recreational waters lacks the power to flourish as year-round area to reside in. So, what ideas come to mind and you consider important in making North Carolina's coastal region more economically viable, creating population growth, while still retaining much of its unique cultural aspects and charm?
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Old 09-16-2011, 03:50 AM
 
Location: Greenville, NC
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In order to do this you need one of two things. You either need industry to come here. Or you need the federal government to come here. I've seen the Piedmont of NC and I can tell you this. If you take Charlotte out of it, the Piedmont is just like Eastern Carolina. As beat down as a lot of people make Eastern Carolina to be, there are places that are significantly worse.
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Old 09-16-2011, 03:57 AM
 
3,271 posts, read 2,645,841 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rwarky View Post
Today, the answer still remains unresolved on why the coastal region, both the inner and outer banks, with its lush topography and abundant recreational waters lacks the power to flourish as year-round area to reside in.


Uh cuz it's like 70% reserved land owned by the state/feds and can't be developed on. This is a good thing, btw. There's Myrtle and Virginia Beach if you want overdevelopment.

The inland areas are suffering because of the mechanization of agriculture and a shift toward even less labor-intensive service sectors with no intermediary industry to function as a transition. Migrant labor also works to keep wages artificially depressed. It creates a chicken and egg situation because without massive programs and capital investment, there's not really any way to create a high-education, high-infrastructure environment to attract new industry. ECU/PCMH is a prime example of what it takes to make that shift, but there's only one of those. Something like RTP and what it took took to create it, never mind the fact it didn't take off for a decade until IBM located there; that would never fly in today's political environment.
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Old 09-16-2011, 05:21 AM
 
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Eastern NC is treated as the red headed step child most of the time by the government and the attitude of the rest of the state. I saw recently where Kay Hagan had pushed for a job training program be placed at two community colleges, both in the western part of the state. Why not put one in the eastern part. Train the people there too, kind of like Field of Dreams train them and they will come. For the most part, in Eastern NC those who thrive for the most part have created a niche for themselves and are running their own businesses. There are many people here willing to work, they just need the opportunity.
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Old 09-16-2011, 06:03 AM
 
Location: Morehead City, NC
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Gotta decide-development, growth, Industry and Commerce or pristine beauty of God's green, sandy and watery NC coast.
There are threads here at CD condemning mans business intrusion along the coast.
Gotta decide what you want to be.
Tourism is still the biggest industry along the coast which requires strategic development. (That ought to evoke a reaction)
MHD City just made a huge stand against PCS Phosphate and their business expansion plans into the area. Why? because the business of MHD and Carteret County is tourism.
Got to decide what you want to be. NYC, Ocean City, Myrtle Beach, Wilmington or Otway, Belhaven, Ocracoke, Bath, Stella or a big ol' stretch of beautiful Core Banks.
Decide what you want to be. But please understand-You can't have NYC and Core banks at the same time.

Last edited by Bill Hitchcock; 09-16-2011 at 06:32 AM..
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Old 09-16-2011, 07:24 AM
 
3,458 posts, read 3,119,572 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rwarky View Post
Today, the answer still remains unresolved on why the coastal region, both the inner and outer banks, with its lush topography and abundant recreational waters lacks the power to flourish as year-round area to reside in.
You must be confused. This is a perfectly fine place to reside in year-round.

Quote:
So, what ideas come to mind and you consider important in making North Carolina's coastal region more economically viable, creating population growth, while still retaining much of its unique cultural aspects and charm?
I think one key is that you need desirable urban areas, and development of urban cores. Build "up", don't build "out".

obviously you need jobs. everywhere needs jobs, whether that is private, local, state, or federal investment. Of course, private investment is ideal.

Wilmington has many of those factors which are needed for long term growth. Wilmington has done well as a spot for retirees to park, and utilize our impressive collection of medical specialists. We have a few key high tech manufacturing industries (GE, Corning), and we have a small port. I think the Wilmington area banks exploited the conditions surrounding the "housing bubble" in spectacular fashion, which brought a ton of speculative money into Wilmington for no apparent reason. That tide of capital overcapitalized Wilmington, creating "paper wealth" for existing landowners, but making it more difficult for anyone outside that circle to get a decent return on any investments made in the area. The more expensive that land and property is, the more expensive commercial and residential rents become, the more you need to pay your workers to satisfy them, and it becomes more expensive for private companies to invest in Wilmington and hire people.

In other words, too many people around here look at real estate as a driver of the economy itself, but the reality is that an overheated real estate market crowds out other types of more productive investment.

Last edited by Cletus Awreetus-Awrightus; 09-16-2011 at 07:50 AM..
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Old 09-16-2011, 11:01 AM
 
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On this forum anything east of Raleigh is lumped into the coastal section, so there is a lot of possiblites of places to have new job opportunities that would not have anything directly to do with the coast. I am more thinking of places such as Kinston, Greenville, Wilson, Rocky Mount and so on. Then more of the people in those communities could afford to visit the Crystal Coast with cash to spend. Win Win for all.
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Old 09-16-2011, 02:55 PM
 
1,512 posts, read 7,279,310 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cletus Awreetus-Awrightus View Post
You must be confused. This is a perfectly fine place to reside in year-round.

I'm sorry but I did not say the area wasn't a great place to live year-round.
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Old 09-16-2011, 05:39 PM
 
3,071 posts, read 7,837,020 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oldraider View Post
Eastern NC is treated as the red headed step child most of the time by the government and the attitude of the rest of the state. I saw recently where Kay Hagan had pushed for a job training program be placed at two community colleges, both in the western part of the state. Why not put one in the eastern part. Train the people there too, kind of like Field of Dreams train them and they will come. For the most part, in Eastern NC those who thrive for the most part have created a niche for themselves and are running their own businesses. There are many people here willing to work, they just need the opportunity.

I think you should be more specific. NE NC is treated like a red headed step child. Craven, Carteret, Onslow, and New Hanover get a disproportionate amount of attention compared to the rest of NC. Pitt is an island unto itself. The Governor is quick to give special attention to Craven/New Bern especially. My wife and I joke about how when anything happens to ENC count on Craven/New Bern to be the first thing out of the Governor mouth. It was either the Rains or Tornados of the past year when Craven was declared a disaster area before the harder hit area of Jones County.
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Old 09-16-2011, 05:53 PM
 
Location: San Diego, CA
144 posts, read 453,228 times
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Default This is fascinating

As a potential transplant at the end of next year with my family and a visitor next May I am reading this with rapt attention.

Since I will be bringing an income with me for my years of civil service I am very interested in opportunity for all of us to better ourselves but I won't be dependent upon it for quite awhile.

We are very into sustainable efforts. We support local farmers, shop (and willingly pay more) to local merchants for products since they keep dollars in our local community and believe in lessening our impact on the environment.

I think that often communities need to look within themselves and, for lack of a better term, bite the bullet to support their neighbors.

Buy at the local Radio Shack rather than sending your dollars who knows where at the mega-stores.

Shop at places such as CostCo that pay decent living wages and benefits.

If there are CSA's to be found nearby, merchants that will fit our needs for what we like and need such as organic foods we will fuel the local economy.

Bigger and outside investment is not always better....it just takes the profit margin away from locals/neighbors and puts it into far away pockets.

But, that is just us.
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