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Old 09-09-2006, 12:42 AM
 
110 posts, read 415,785 times
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OK - so I'm not 100% sure I'm moving, but it's gone from a slight possibility to quite possible/almost probable(?).... When I first posted I had just sent a resume, now I'm in the interview process and it looks like a have a good shot of getting the job. Unlike many (most) posters I read on this site, I am not fleeing exhorbitant housing prices or nasty weather or crowded conditions. In fact I think the weather here in Oregon is the best in the country! And I already live in a charming small town. I'm not fleeing anything....I just have a fantastic job opportunity. If I get the job, I will be working in the Greenville area (to the south of Greenville). It is important to me to find property that has good appreciation potential, as I hope to retire back to Oregon, and housing here is more expensive. So I will need good equity to buy back into this market in the future. I have been looking at suburbs and smaller towns to the south of Greenville. Winterville looks good - as most of the real estate listings are new homes, so it seems like a growing area (a fact confirmed by the town's web site). Does anyone live in or have firsthand knowledge of the area? I have a son in high school so school quality is important to me, as well. While I personally would like an older home in an established neighborhood (i.e. big trees), it seems like as an investment a new home might be wiser. Any thoughts?
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Old 09-09-2006, 07:01 AM
 
2,356 posts, read 2,638,337 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by robin from Oregon View Post
I am not fleeing exhorbitant housing prices or nasty weather or crowded conditions. In fact I think the weather here in Oregon is the best in the country! And I already live in a charming small town. I'm not fleeing anything....

It is important to me to find property that has good appreciation potential..

I have a son in high school so school quality is important to me, as well. .

Any thoughts?
My first thought: Culture shock! Make SURE you visit Greenville, NC, before you move there. If you love Oregon weather, you probably won't like Greenville's weather. It might be difficult to find a good school or property that will appreciate. I'm no expert, just my .02 - be careful.
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Old 09-09-2006, 07:27 AM
 
Location: MI
333 posts, read 1,097,037 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by robin from Oregon View Post
OK - so I'm not 100% sure I'm moving, but it's gone from a slight possibility to quite possible/almost probable(?).... When I first posted I had just sent a resume, now I'm in the interview process and it looks like a have a good shot of getting the job. Unlike many (most) posters I read on this site, I am not fleeing exhorbitant housing prices or nasty weather or crowded conditions. In fact I think the weather here in Oregon is the best in the country! And I already live in a charming small town. I'm not fleeing anything....I just have a fantastic job opportunity. If I get the job, I will be working in the Greenville area (to the south of Greenville). It is important to me to find property that has good appreciation potential, as I hope to retire back to Oregon, and housing here is more expensive. So I will need good equity to buy back into this market in the future. I have been looking at suburbs and smaller towns to the south of Greenville. Winterville looks good - as most of the real estate listings are new homes, so it seems like a growing area (a fact confirmed by the town's web site). Does anyone live in or have firsthand knowledge of the area? I have a son in high school so school quality is important to me, as well. While I personally would like an older home in an established neighborhood (i.e. big trees), it seems like as an investment a new home might be wiser. Any thoughts?
Well unless there is a boomerang effect from the people in Charlotte/Raleigh/Asheville I doubt you will be finding great appreciation in Greenville. You need a large spike in demand for housing in an area to see good appreciation - the bigger cities in NC are where the influx of people are happening and hence where real estate is rising (and should into the future) - but Greenville is not one of those areas that there is a large population surge happening so I am not sure how much you can count on appreciation. When I say this I am not saying there won't be appreciation, but if its 6% in Greenville, and 12% in Oregon year after year, you will fall behind in the appreciation rates very quickly in the 2 areas.

Is it possible you can rent out your current home and it can either pay for itself (mortgage) or at least pay 80% of your current mortgage? Then you can keep the house you are in now and the cost of housing in NC will probably seem low especially in an area like Greenville. Or if you have a lot of equity in the OR home you can draw down on it and buy a house for cash in NC and still only 1 have mortgage payment (the house in OR).

Oregon is seeing some pretty huge appreciation so if you can make it work to keep the old property (you can use a property manager for a fee if you rent it out), and buy a new one in NC - than yuo should try that. It sounds like you are very excited about your new job so having something you do in life that you love is very important since you spend most waking hours at "work", so don't let the property values get in the way - finding something you love to do day in and day out is a very hard commodity and adds a lot to "quality of life". But as stated above, there are different routes you can go to keep your old property if you want to retire back there someday.
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Old 09-09-2006, 05:04 PM
 
110 posts, read 415,785 times
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Thanks for the advice! Actually I had considered renting my home. I have a married daughter here that would probably be willing to manage it for me. That would be my first choice, but it will depend on what my salary is, because there would definitely be a negative cash flow (there's not a huge demand for rentals in the town I live in, especially large houses). But hopefully I could swing it to buy a smaller home there and keep this one. That would make moving alot easier to, if I don't have to wait for this house to sell. I don't have enough equity to pay cash for a house there, but I could probably take enough out for a decent down payment. Appreciation the past couple of years has been phenomenal, and while I don't expect it to continue at the same rate, I think it probably will average out to be more here than in Greenville.

I used to live in southern Illinois, close to Kentucky, for 20 years. So humidity and thunderstorms are nothing new to me (although I haven't missed them!) And this would be a terrific job.

I would still love to hear from anyone that lives/has lived in the Greenville/Winterville area!
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Old 09-09-2006, 06:06 PM
 
Location: East central NC
212 posts, read 988,876 times
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You might consider Ayden just about 10 miles South of Greenville down Hwy 11. Nice older homes on Main St. with a small but very functioning downtown. Usually some of these homes are for sale in a fixer-upper state so the potential to turn a profit is there. I like the Chicod area about 10 miles south of G-Vegas on hwy 43 as well, although this is a very rural area, really just a crossroads with a convenience store and a large old elementary school.

Winterville is essentially part of Greenville now.
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Old 09-09-2006, 11:07 PM
 
110 posts, read 415,785 times
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G-Vegas? is that a nickname for Greenville? Does that imply a party town? (I'm just guessing here....) I saw some property I liked in Ayden on realtor.com. But it's a little early to start looking for a house - I don't even have the job yet! Do you know how the schools in a smaller town would compare with the city schools? I live in a very small town out here (pop <800). The school doesn't have a lot to offer in the way of electives, but the principal knows all the kids. So there's pros and cons either way. Do you know anything about Grifton? Just a little further south of Ayden on the map. If I get this job I will be working close to La Grange, west of Kinston. But I didn't like the crime stats for Kinston or La Grange, and like I said appreciation is important so I thought it would be better to be closer to Greenville. I sure appreciate the information and advice! (Southern hospitality!)
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Old 09-10-2006, 01:37 AM
 
Location: Wilson
505 posts, read 2,313,073 times
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G-Vegas! Yeah, it's a party town. When you think of Greenville, or go to Greenville, it's to go downtown to the bars and nightclubs. East Carolina U is here and all they do is party...lol

You are thinking about the south side of G-vegas though. There are plenty of nice neighborhoods in that area. It is also growing fairly fast. I think you will turn a profit on your home. Not a ton, but you will be fine. (You will not have to worry about parties there)

The area is very flat. Lots of pine trees and farms. It is nothing like Oregon, thats for sure. We have hot humid summers, and mild to at times cold winters.
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Old 09-10-2006, 07:57 AM
 
Location: East central NC
212 posts, read 988,876 times
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The crime stats for La Grange must be skewed in some way. It is a breathtakingly small, laid back Southern whistlestop town. Sure there are some small time drug thugs putt putting around in their tuner cars but lets be realistic here....to do a drive by you'd have to factor in a wait at the one stoplight in town. "L.A.", as it is (jokingly) known here, is just Main St. USA and the residents are pleased to have it that way.

Grifton is capital S small too. Alot of folks worked at the DuPont fibers plant just to the South, but it only employs a fraction of the workforce it once did. I worked there for about 8 years myself before my area shut down. At one time it was "the" place to work, when the alternative was the tobacco fields. I have to say they treated me very well when they closed; I was able to draw a good severance and return to school full time.

I think you are really going to miss Oregon. I have friends who moved there who basically laugh at my continued allegiance to NC.....as if it doesn't really compare with Oregon very well at all. It IS flat and swampy here....very little snow, skiing is pretty lame even in the best spots way out to the mountains.....but I love it, people are genuine and try to get along, and did I mention the fishing is great? LOL East NC is home now.
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Old 09-10-2006, 08:14 AM
 
Location: East central NC
212 posts, read 988,876 times
Reputation: 262
The deal with Greenville is that they have a large University (about 17,000 full time students) and a great new hospital with a respected school of medicine.

Apart from the ridiculous party scene of which I am thankfully no longer a part (LOL!), Greenville has real jobs and a somewhat booming economy. So it is the local hub of (for East NC) urban life. I.E., there are some restaraunts and a small local club scene. You've got to go to Raleigh or down to Wilmington to see any nightlife beyond a country biker roadhouse or dancehall, or a coastal beer pub, besides our beloved "G-Vegas"!

Becareful in Greenville though, the ECU football team is notoriously bad (just lost to Navy), and the locals are VERY sensitive about it. Better to discuss religion, politics, or the market price of swine.
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Old 09-10-2006, 04:06 PM
 
110 posts, read 415,785 times
Reputation: 53
I am expecting to miss Oregon, in many ways. The scenery and climate here are breathtakingly beautiful. And my married kids and grandkids are here. I don't look at this as a permanent move - that's why appreciation and/or keeping my home here are important to me. If I move, it will be for an offer I can't refuse. I need to get my financial ducks in a row if I ever want to retire, and this will be a step in the right direction. That said, I am very adaptable and expect to be happy in NC. I have lived in flat and humid before, and I don't ski so snow isn't an issue. Really all I need to be happy is to make friends and find a good church. Small town culture suits me fine.
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