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Old 08-08-2015, 08:25 AM
 
353 posts, read 472,334 times
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Honestly, I think you should look somewhere else if this is such a big concern for you. Please realize, though, we aren't Venice, poling about in gondolas isn't part of our daily life. The last time we saw any significant flooding was around 1999 or 2000, I think.

In a "normal" year, nothing happens at all. It's called a 100 year flood because the odds are you'll only get one that bad once every 100 years. That means for 99 years the odds say you have nothing to worry about. "Normally" it occasionally rains, the water goes in a gutter or ditch, kids stomp in mud puddles for a little while, people complain that the grass is growing too fast but it's too wet to mow. Then the sun comes out and people go back to saying how we sure could use some rain.

If your home is built to the required flood standards, it's probably more likely to get flooded from a leaking water heater or busted washing machine hose than from a storm.
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Old 08-08-2015, 10:05 AM
 
4,958 posts, read 2,204,220 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by goldenage1 View Post

Other damage caused by hurricanes is from flying debris, like pieces of roofing and tree limbs. Flying debris can pierce windows and siding, and expose the rest of the house to damage from rain entering.
Think brick and real, operating storm shutters.

You can build a "bomb proof" house. Kinda sorta. You can not make guarantees. Water can flood lower levels around houses even those set on pilings. With proper construction and common sense, damage can be minimized. That is what insurance company's and banks try to get you to do. The sad part will be all that landscaping you worked so hard on. However, if a CAT 5 comes rolling in you can probably kiss it all good by. That is why you have insurance.
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Old 08-08-2015, 10:06 AM
 
Location: Sneads Ferry, NC
11,261 posts, read 19,800,542 times
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If the OP want to find a quick answer about what flood-zone a lot is in, the Floodsmart.gov web site has a quick tool. It also has educational material like an interactive cost tool: https://www.floodsmart.gov/floodsmart/

For a detailed map of St James, the OP can go to the Brunsco GIS site, put in the address, and turn on the "flood zone" layer under the layer tab on the left: Brunswick County GIS
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Old 08-08-2015, 11:30 AM
 
183 posts, read 241,390 times
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I recently purchased flood insurance on a home purchase in New Bern.FEMA is a complete pain in the ass to be honest.My insurance company has bent over backward to satisfy every little thing they want.Apparently they are reviewing most of all flood insurance policies throughout the country.The mortgage company who purchased my mortgage after my purchase is a pain as well regarding the policy.
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Old 08-08-2015, 11:48 AM
 
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Flood zone definitions

500 Year Flood Area**- The flood elevation that has a 0.2‐percent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any given year; it is not the flood that will occur once every 500 years.

Area not studied**- Areas that have not been studied by FEMA.

Flood Transition Area**- An area that is adjacent to a Special Flood Hazard Area, and that may be subject to development regulations.

Floodway - The area along both sides of a river, tributary, or creek including the main channel that has the
strictest regulations on it because it is the area that is needed to move the 1 percent flood downstream and out of the homes or businesses that it may have flooded. The state of Washington does not allow construction in the floodway.

Floodway Fringe - The portion of the floodplain lying on either side of the floodway.

Non‐Special Flood Hazard Area (NSFHA) - An area in a low to moderate risk flood zone (Zones B, C, X) that is not in any immediate danger from flooding caused by overflowing rivers or hard rains. However, it's important to note that structures within a NSFHA are still at risk.

Outside flood area**- An area determined to be outside of a Special Flood Hazard Area, and considered to be a moderate or low risk flood area.

Special Flood Hazard Area (SFHA)

A high‐risk flood area that has special flood, mudflow, or flood‐related erosion hazards. This area is shown on a Flood Hazard Boundary Map or a Flood Insurance Rate Map as Zone A, AO, A1‐A30, AE, A99, AH, AR, AR/A, AR/AE, AR/AH, AR/AO, AR/A1‐A30, V1‐V30, VE, or V. Flood insurance is mandatory for properties in a SFHA.

Flood Zone Designations reflect the severity or type of flooding in an area. Your property may be located in a high risk zone or a low to moderate risk zone.

High Risk Zones

 A High flood risk. Base flood elevations have not been determined. Flood insurance is mandatory and local floodplain development codes apply. These properties have a 1 percent annual chance of flooding and a 26 percent chance of flooding over the life of a 30‐year mortgage.*
*
 AE*‐*High flood risk. Base flood elevations have been determined. Flood insurance is mandatory and local floodplain development codes apply. These properties have a 1 percent annual chance of flooding and a 26 percent chance of flooding over the life of a 30‐year mortgage.*
*
 AH High flood risk. Base flood elevations have been determined. Flood insurance is mandatory and local floodplain development codes apply. These properties have a 1 percent annual chance of shallow flooding, usually in the form of a pond, with an average depth of one to three feet.**

 AO*‐*High flood risk. Flood insurance is mandatory and local floodplain development codes apply. River or stream flood hazard areas, and areas with a one percent or greater chance of shallow flooding each year, usually in the form of sheet flow, with an average depth or one to three feet. These areas have a 26 percent chance of flooding over the life of a 20‐year mortgage.**

 AR Areas with temporarily increased flood risk due to the building or restoration of a flood control system (such as a levee or a dam). Flood insurance is mandatory, but rates will not exceed rates for unnumbered A zones if the structure is built or restored in compliance with Zone AR floodplain management regulations.

Low to Moderate Risk Zones

 X (shaded) Area of moderate flood hazard. This flood risk is reduced, but not removed. Flood insurance is not required in this zone, but is available and local floodplain development codes may apply.**

 X (unshaded) These properties are outside the high‐risk zones. This flood risk is reduced, but not removed. Flood insurance is not required in this zone, but is available and local floodplain development codes may apply.
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Old 08-09-2015, 07:42 AM
 
13 posts, read 15,849 times
Reputation: 15
Thank you all for your very helpful comments
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