U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > North Carolina > Coastal North Carolina
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 08-06-2015, 06:34 AM
 
13 posts, read 15,787 times
Reputation: 15

Advertisements

We are considering buying a lot and building in St James - one possibility is in the "flood zone" - Can I get input from those of you who have done this as to what questions to ask, what difficulties you have encountered and what the impact of being in the flood zone has been on your home.
Much appreciated.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 08-06-2015, 07:12 AM
 
4,956 posts, read 2,197,701 times
Reputation: 7094
  • Get a elevation survey for the property so you know what the height above sea level is.
  • Find out what the 100 year (1%) flood water height is. This is probably 11 feet or there bouts.
  • The first floor of the house needs to be at least a couple of feet above the 100 year flood height. The higher it is, the better in terms of flood insurance.
  • You may need flood vents in the garage or foundation or both. They are not very expensive in the overall scheme of things.
  • My opinion is a crawl space is a bad idea. I would go with an elevated slab or pilings if the lot is really low. If an elevated slab gets the first floor a few feet above the 100 year flood plane, it makes sense. Then there will be no water under the house, no mold or mildew issues etc.
  • The AC unit may need to be a an elevated platform. Again, not an expensive thing to do.
  • Keep in mind that FEMA regulates flood insurance. Steps you can take to keep things dry like those above will keep the rate down but if FEMA decides next year to double the rates, there is nothing you can do but pay it.
  • Depending on several variables, most mentioned here, flood insurance may be $400 a year or $1,800 a year, more or less.
  • So .. again .. get a elevation survey for the land, talk to your builder about steps to take during construction, talk to your bank, if financing, about their requirements.
  • In addition to flood insurance ( which can be nominal if you build the house right) you will need the typical homeowners insurance and wind and hail insurance. Wind and hail may be the most expensive at around $2,000 a year. If your insurance company want more than that, I would shop around. You often get discounts if you do all of these and car insurance with one company.

NOTE:

For example ....

If your lot is 10 feet above sea level and the 100 year flood plane is 11 feet above sea level, then you elevate the first floor one foot to get it to the 100 year flood plane. Most any foundation will do this and probably more. So if your land is at 10, the foundation adds 3 feet, then the first floor would be at 13 feet. The flood plane is at 11 so odds are the first floor will always be 2 feet above any flood waters in extreme cases. This is why you see water front homes, where the elevation is only 2 or 3 feet, on pilings that are 8-10 feet tall to get first floor above the flood plane.

Last edited by ditchoc; 08-06-2015 at 07:21 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-06-2015, 08:36 AM
LLN
 
Location: Upstairs closet
4,981 posts, read 8,742,906 times
Reputation: 6451
My advice is whatever you do, don't "stretch it." You may need to sell the home one day and you really don't want flood plain to be an issue.

I lived in a home on pilings on Oak Island, right across from St James, for several years. Loved it. Like living in a tree house. Of course I was younger then.

If I did it today, I would get a small elevator. Put your house up good and high. Good Luck.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-06-2015, 11:45 AM
 
13 posts, read 15,787 times
Reputation: 15
This is very helpful information. Thanks!
LLN can you tell me if you ever had water problems in your Oak Island house from flood plane related issues?
Also - if anyone can tell me about their experience with high water (either on the inter-coastal or on the marsh) that would be helpful information. I am looking for the good, the bad and the ugly - want to be fully informed.
Last, but not least, how would an elevator work? If folks have them can you chime in?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-06-2015, 12:48 PM
 
Location: Sneads Ferry, NC
11,250 posts, read 19,768,765 times
Reputation: 5077
Quote:
Originally Posted by assez View Post
Last, but not least, how would an elevator work? If folks have them can you chime in?
I do not have an elevator, but have discussed it if we ever needed it. In a flood-prone area, the motor has to be installed above the elevator, such as in an attic. You need the space of a coat-closet to serve 2 people, and it would cost about $20,000-25,000. Your electric panel obviously has to be enough to handle the additional electric motor.

Many beach houses have elevators, especially if the house is built on pilings. If you install it as part of the house, the cost can be added to a mortgage.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-06-2015, 04:19 PM
 
4,956 posts, read 2,197,701 times
Reputation: 7094
As an RN I work for a couple, one of whom is handicapped, that live in a multi story condo with an elevator. It is a fairly simple set up. It obviously needs to be in a convenient location in the home. There is a standard house door inside on the upper floor and an exterior door to the outside in the parking garage under the condo. The doors are automatically latched when the elevator is not on that floor. In the elevator is a large red button that must be pulled out for it to run. It acts as an emergency stop button. There is a large rocker style switch similar to the light switches found in some home that you must hold for the elevator to travel up or down. Depending on the elevator it will have a weight limit, probably around 500-600 pounds. It is big enough for two people and a few bags or maybe a child or two.

At night, with the elevator on the upper floor, you can press the emergency stop button in to disable it and prevent it from going down for security.

Out side the doors is a call button you can bring it to your floor if the emergency stop button is not pushed in.

That's pretty much it. It is certainly big enough to fit a wheel chair and the person in it and a companion.

If you have multiple floors or the lower floor exit is not in a covered garage then the design will need to accommodate your floor plan.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-06-2015, 05:00 PM
LLN
 
Location: Upstairs closet
4,981 posts, read 8,742,906 times
Reputation: 6451
It has been awhile, but we had 1 square foot, either the lot or the house, that was in a flood plain..i.e., was an issue. Our home was 12 feet above the lot (so I could get my boat under the house). I had a partially enclosed area for a workshop underneath in addition to parking. I don't remember, but the walls were vented or something, to allow water to flow in and out.

It was an absolute non issue for me. If I did it again, I would certainly have an elevator. There are a lot of options, and I would do so cause I am 22 years older than when I lived there.

Oh, we were on the ICW. The way the winds blow on MOST hurricanes, extreme high water was not a problem for us. We were lucky, but I would plan for the worst.

Again, a non issue, but we made it so.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-06-2015, 05:39 PM
 
Location: Southport
4,639 posts, read 4,807,131 times
Reputation: 3417
Does St. James allow houses to be built on pilings?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-06-2015, 06:32 PM
 
4,956 posts, read 2,197,701 times
Reputation: 7094
Quote:
Originally Posted by carolinadawg2 View Post
Does St. James allow houses to be built on pilings?
several are
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-07-2015, 11:19 AM
 
13 posts, read 15,787 times
Reputation: 15
How bad is the flooding in the Oak Island/St James area? Is it very different on the ICW than in the marshy areas?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:



Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > North Carolina > Coastal North Carolina
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top