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Old 12-13-2014, 06:11 AM
 
Location: New Jersey
383 posts, read 746,407 times
Reputation: 214

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I echo Gator's comments on BB&T. The process of obtaining a construction loan and converting it to perm was simple. They were awesome. I could not believe how easy it was. We brought money to the closing. I asked if we needed a Bank check. They said, No and that a personal check was fine. If that was a NJ bank, they would NEVER have done that. They would have asked for a certified check and my first born a collateral.
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Old 12-13-2014, 07:44 AM
 
Location: New Jersey
383 posts, read 746,407 times
Reputation: 214
$4,500 seem fair for financing, but it is dependent on the structure value. Homes here usually take 6 months or less and, in a construction loan situation, it is based on an increasing loan amount as the completion percentage of the home increases. If the construction cost of the home is $300K and the average loan amount over the 6 month period is $200K, at 4%, the interest would be about $4,000. Seems like a wash in terms of the approach you take.
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Old 12-13-2014, 09:30 AM
 
38 posts, read 70,872 times
Reputation: 33
Gator,

Many thanks for posting the Guidelines link, very informative. We have a lot in Members and at the time of purchase the setbacks were 40' front, 10' side and 20' back. Didn't notice any amendments to the guidelines that changed those numbers. The question that I have is are the setbacks from the structure only, or are driveways included? The plan that we are considering is 60' wide on a 99' wide lot (which would clearly leave room for the required setbacks). But, if we add in the 32' driveway turn area (which appears to be required in the guidelines) along with the 3' setback from driveway to adjacent lot, that does not leave me enough room to meet minimum side setbacks. Any thoughts?
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Old 12-13-2014, 09:50 AM
 
38 posts, read 70,872 times
Reputation: 33
Ooops,

After re-reading driveway standards, saw that 32' turn area is "recommended" so looks like there might be some flexibility there. Still would appreciate any feedback/comments on personal experiences. Thanks folks.
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Old 12-13-2014, 01:01 PM
 
Location: Southport, NC
93 posts, read 168,535 times
Reputation: 65
@LakeEffect

Since driveways extend to the street (clearly infringing on front setbacks for the front at least), I'd guess that setbacks don't apply to driveways, but do apply to structures. But I would get a builder to confirm that before making your plans "concrete", pun intended! However (important), the portion of your driveway that extends past the property line to the street counts towards the impervious limit.

Gatorbyter
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Old 12-14-2014, 06:46 AM
 
Location: Shelton, CT
10 posts, read 18,717 times
Reputation: 15
I noticed in the December issue of CatTails in the Presidents column he noted: "The Developer has announced an agreement with local hospitals to build a medical complex just outside the SeaSide exit. We are fortunate the Developer remains engaged and committed to our community."

Does anyone have more info on this or a link to the announcement?
Thanks
Skip
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Old 12-14-2014, 08:13 AM
 
38 posts, read 70,872 times
Reputation: 33
Gator,

Pun accepted! (and appreciated!) After having viewed the plantation with Google Earth, I can see that the majority of homes with side load garages have driveways that are very close to the adjacent property lines. That would seem to support your thoughts. Thanks for the info.

Lake
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Old 12-14-2014, 10:14 AM
 
Location: Sneads Ferry, NC
11,319 posts, read 19,940,242 times
Reputation: 5106
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorbyter View Post
These are the POA Design Requirements, including minimum home size requirements AND maximum impervious surface limits (important).

https://www.dropbox.com/s/l3h4lod7du...lines.pdf?dl=0

In some areas, like mine, you may find the maximum impervious surface limit to be a bit painful and could require you to downsize the home a bit or possibly move it more forward on the lot than you really desire. BTW, in SJP, pavers and rock surfaces could towards the limit.
BTW, the rules on impervious surface area originate from State laws, the Coastal Area Management Act (CAMA). So they are not unique to St James, and you will find the same limits in other coastal areas. The intent was to allow water to percolate back into the ground, rather than running off into coastal water.

I have never asked about the semi-permeable surfaces, and how they are counted. You can build a driveway that alternates masonry with clumps of vegetation, but not sure SJP would allow that.
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Old 12-16-2014, 11:51 AM
 
4,984 posts, read 2,234,404 times
Reputation: 7151
Pavers are also considered semi-permeable. I have noticed at least one LARGE drive way in SJP, a horseshoe with two connections to the street with a parking areas, all done in pavers. Its more expensive than concrete but it looks nice. I thought semi-permeable would increases the hard-scape you can have but maybe not.

I did a construction loan with the NCSECU, or North Carolina State Employees Credit Union. It went pretty smoothly. You don't have to be a NC employee, just have a friend that is a member recommend you and you are in. Nice thing about NSCECU is they are everywhere in the state. Seems there is always one close by.

Also note that set backs can vary depending on the lot. My lot was on the corner and set backs were a little different and the direction the front of the house faced was spelled out. I had some neighbors want to complain about the direction my house faced but it was not my choice.
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Old 12-17-2014, 02:30 AM
 
Location: Southport, NC
93 posts, read 168,535 times
Reputation: 65
Actually, per the SJP POA Architectural Control Committee (ACC), pavers are considered 100% impervious, and will count the same as concrete towards your impervious limit. I confirmed this a few months ago when I was considering an alternative to a raised-deck construction. Unfortunately this is a point of confusion with some construction peeps within the SJP, so call the POA and alleviate a future problem.

Gatorbyter

Last edited by Gatorbyter; 12-17-2014 at 03:17 AM..
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