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Old 10-05-2011, 08:58 PM
 
Location: North Carolina
572 posts, read 1,414,330 times
Reputation: 490

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stonecreek67 View Post
OK.... just got back from Oak Island where we had a very nice assortment of seafood at a full house at Turtle Island amongst a bunch of the nicest people, many from St James. I must report that we got back safely with no incidents or encounters with knife / gun totin' types...... and no traffic.... methinks "someone" just might be in need of a reality check.... just maybe.
You mean kinda like driving on Oak Island and not being able to see the trailer park because a singlewide mobile home is blocking your view?
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Old 10-05-2011, 09:29 PM
 
Location: New Jersey
794 posts, read 1,647,284 times
Reputation: 343
I believe someone may have missed his nap this afternoon.
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Old 10-06-2011, 04:36 AM
 
Location: Phoenix, AZ > Raleigh, NC
15,168 posts, read 19,227,199 times
Reputation: 24314
Quote:
Originally Posted by Time2Travel View Post
You mean kinda like driving on Oak Island and not being able to see the trailer park because a singlewide mobile home is blocking your view?
I'm not from the area (we are planning to visit soon to consider it for retirement), and I do not ever want to live in a mobile home, but I'm a bit confused. Are you saying that only rednecks live in trailer parks?

My confusion is based on the abundent trailer parks we have here in Arizona. Yes, some are pretty dumpy and typically filled with folks, young and old, who are poor. There are also some trailer parks that are quite nice, primarily set up as 55+ communities.

The properties you cited on Trulia all seem to be less than 3 blocks from the beach. In most areas of the country, that would be prime real estate.
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Old 10-06-2011, 12:19 PM
 
Location: New Jersey
794 posts, read 1,647,284 times
Reputation: 343
So, senor Time2Travel..... you're right, that Trulia thing is really keen ! But you must be careful what you wish for, at the bottom of each of those listings, you're site "Trulia" gives Oak Island it's top rating of "Excellent" for safety and community involvement, you obviously overlooked that section.... but why let facts get in the way.

I am also completely flabbergasted to find that you were able to find a newspaper article that reports that even on remote Oak Island there was a young girl that got pregnant out of wedlock, a shocking and I'm sure an isolated development in 2011..... AND.... AND in addition to that, to my utter astonishment, someone got arrested for Marijuanna possession on the very same Oak Island, yes, in 2011 someone got arrested for Marijuanna possession in America..... these two examples you give are amazing and I am sure have never happened anywhere else in North Carolina...... dare I say even in the city that you live.

But, back to your beloved Trulia just for a moment.... it's funny, you obviously "neglected" to go far enough in the listings to show the huge amount of larger, more upscale and expensive homes scattered throughout the same area....

28465 Real Estate & 28465 Homes For Sale — Trulia.com

I'm positive it was just an oversight on your part and not simply your ignorance and myopic, neanderthal-like opinion of someone that might dare to live on or even visit Oak Island.

Last edited by Stonecreek67; 10-06-2011 at 12:42 PM..
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Old 10-06-2011, 01:17 PM
 
8 posts, read 21,122 times
Reputation: 10
I am curious as to those who have purchased homes or lots in SJP why did you decide to go re-sale or why you decided to buy a lot and build. Are there batter values going one way or the other? Or just a matter of timing or personal preference? Thanks.
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Old 10-06-2011, 05:17 PM
 
Location: New Jersey
383 posts, read 747,100 times
Reputation: 214
My original intent was to buy a resale. After much research my personal preference was to have a house built on a slab. Since there were not many houses on the golf course for sale that met this criteria, I looked into buying a lot. I purchased a golf course lot in the Reserve and will build a home on a slab. The cost of the lot (since prices have really dropped) and the new construction will work out to be the same as a 10 yr old resale.
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Old 10-07-2011, 05:31 AM
 
Location: New Jersey
844 posts, read 2,688,276 times
Reputation: 660
Are there any advantages of a slab over a crawl space or a crawl space over a slab?
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Old 10-07-2011, 07:55 AM
 
Location: New Jersey
794 posts, read 1,647,284 times
Reputation: 343
That's a good question Marc.....there are several ways to look at it..... a house on a slab is of course less costly, that's where any "advantage" stops for me. IMHO and almost everyone I speak to "down here" ( a new building environment for me ) say the crawlspace is the way to go and I concur. A slab of concrete is just that, a slab of concrete to walk and stand on for the next 25 years, no matter what flooring is on it, wood, carpet and especially tile, it is hard on the back and legs but that may not bother some people, it bothers me, especially as I get older. Up North that slab of concrete is "colder" in the winter and not "quite" as comfortable in the winter.... now the ground doesn't freeze down here like up north but it still gets mighty cold and I don't relish the thought of testing the theory. Once that slab is poured which includes all the plumbing and wiring.... that's it, no going back after the house is built to repair or add anything new such as new technology wiring, etc...... I don't like that.

The crawlspace affords the ability to install real hardwood flooring, go back under the house for any repairs and adding of new wiring, plumbing, etc., and is easier on the back as you are walking on wood joists which "give" a bit under your feet, if there are any grandkids around it is much "nicer" for them to fall down on a wood floor than on concrete. The question is whether to condition or not condition the crawlspace. To prevent a mold situation in the crawlspace as it is very humid many months of the year down here, it can be left alone with vents every few feet which has been working fine for many, many years or it can be "encapsulated" / "closed in completely" ( sort of like a shallow basement down there ) with a zone off the HVAC system and the air down there is conditioned / dehumified completely eliminating the chance of any mold and also keeping that space ( and therefore the floor above it ) at a more even temperature level, also allowing any hardwood flooring to breathe and not "cup"..... encapsulation seems to be the preferred method from almost everyone I speak to including the architect and quite a few builders. People, builders, etc are still building with all three methods, slab, un-conditioned crawlspace with vents and conditioned / encapsulated crawlspaces...... but most I speak to are and have of late been going with the encapsulated method. I have decided that the way I'm going is to encapsulate the crawlspace, much better IMHO.
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Old 10-07-2011, 03:59 PM
 
Location: New Jersey
383 posts, read 747,100 times
Reputation: 214
I prefer a slab over a crawlspace because of the potential moisture issues with a crawlspace. With the humidity and moisture there is a good opportunity to have mold issues and the elements also could have impact on the floor joists and sheathing. If you look under a crawlspace, the insulation in the floor joists gets moist and wet. The only way to make sure the moisture is not a problem is to encapsulate the area and have a skim coat of masonary on the floor and possibly instal a dehumidipher with a thermostat. You also don't have to live with rodents camping out in the crawlspace and less change of undetected termite tunnels

Slabs are harder on the back but the wood flooring will absorb some shock and give when you walk.
It is really a personal decision and there is no right or wrong answer. You won't go wrong either way.
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Old 10-07-2011, 06:51 PM
 
Location: New Jersey
794 posts, read 1,647,284 times
Reputation: 343
As described earlier.... they now have it down to a science regarding the moisture in the crawl space, nothing gets wet..... no longer an issue...... in addition, the closed / encapsulated system doen not allow creatures down there.... it also allows easy access to the plumbing and electric instead of having to jack hammer the floor up inside your house to make any repairs or changes..... BUT, they still will do slabs as they are the least expensive way to go.
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