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Old 04-28-2006, 05:50 AM
 
291 posts, read 1,647,398 times
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I have made two trips down so far and the area I like the most is the area around and between Wilmington and Myrtle beach.
Everyone seems to prefer other areas, especially the triangle or Charlotte area. I love the beaches and am thinking specifically about Hampstead,Castle Hayne,Leland,Shalotte,North Myrtle beach and Conway.
Are there no jobs around the coast? Is the crime too high? We are from Connecticut.
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Old 04-28-2006, 07:18 AM
 
Location: Snow Hill, NC
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My BIL lives in Rocky Point in Pender County. What I gathered out of him the taxes are lower in Pender County than in New Hanover County. So you might want to get just a little further inland into Pender County. I don't recall if Castle Hayne is in Pender County or not. But Rocky Point is very nice and a not too far out. But let me add here that when he was married to a woman that had two children that were not his but step children, she would not send them to Pender County schools. I have no idea why but it irked him to no end for her to drive them into Wilmington for school and they were about 20 miles from the school in Wilmington. But I can't honestly say if there was something wrong with the schools or if it was her. I tend to lean towards her being part of the problem. She was a force to behold let me tell you. But just in case she knew something that the rest of us don't, you might want to check it out if you have school age kids. Her children were about 7 and 11 at the time. They are something like 13 and 17 now. Actually, Ashley might be 18. She had a birthday in March. Hurricane season might be another deterent to the coast as well. I saw what Fran did to Wilmington. And a lot of the hurricanes we get here in the east come up through Wilmington and Mrytle Beach head on.

Last edited by Bethanytedder; 04-28-2006 at 07:24 AM..
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Old 04-28-2006, 07:27 AM
 
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Fear of hurricanes may be a huge factor for many Salatheel.

Some, if not all, of the areas you mentioned can take *direct* hits.
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Old 04-28-2006, 07:30 AM
 
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Quote:
Hurricane season might be another deterent to the coast as well. I saw what Fran did to Wilmington. And a lot of the hurricanes we get here in the east come up through Wilmington and Mrytle Beach head on.
Bethany...I was just sitting here thinking that I couldn't believe you left that out (hurricane risk) ...you must have been editing & adding when I posted....
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Old 04-28-2006, 07:47 AM
 
Location: Snow Hill, NC
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Are you kidding? I am the hurricane queen around here anyway. I survived Hazel in 1954 and that was I guess the worse one that has ever hit North Carolina. I was only 3 but I was here and I remember some of it. The most recent one is Fran as a wind maker and Floyd for probably at least as much flooding damage. We had a huge elm tree that was off at the lower end of the property when Isabelle came through in 2003 wasn't it? Now if you recall, this critter was a cat.5 at one point. But by the time she got here, she had gotten a little more reasonable about the situation. But the day before she was due to hit, I took the camera out and took before pictures because I just knew she was going to blow us to bits. And I looked at the elm tree. And I figured if we had any damage at all, it would be from this tree hitting the house. Well, as predicted, the tree fell and missed the house by 8". How is that for sheer luck? Also the tree was located on the property that was actually owned by the town for a lift station. So they had to pick up the tab for the removal. We made out pretty good on that one.

Let me also tell you the hurricane risk if I can. We normally will get hit about once every 3 years or so. Most of the time they are Cat 1 storms and just kinda rain on everything and blow trampolines over and maybe take out a few trees and shingles off the roof. But from 1996-1999 we were hit by Bertha and Fran six weeks apart in 1996, Bonnie in 1998 and Dennis came by here twice and followed two weeks later by Floyd once Dennis finally got out of here. Floyd in itself was not that big of a wind maker. What made Floyd so deadly was the fact that Dennis' two visits set up a situation that Floyd finished off. Dennis hit around mid August, went off towards Bermuda and did a loop de loop and came back for a second round as a tropical storm on August 30, 1999. Floyd came in around September 17, 1999 maybe. Like I said, Floyd was no wind maker but all the rain that fell caused the already saturated ground to not only flood but to caused a lot of trees to fall in places that didn't need a tree to fall on. There were 42 deaths in the state. In Pinetops, a family was rescued from their attic when the flood waters came. While we were not personally affected, taking my husband to the stoplight and watch him wade out into the waters some 3/4 mile from the house and get into a row boat to go to work is something you don't soon forget. President Clinton even came to Tarboro some 25 miles from us. Even if I had wanted to see him, I couldn't have gotten there due to the flooding. How he did it is a mystery to me. Princeville was hit very hard. The flooding uprooted caskets from the ground. Also remember when you make your choice as to which area of the state to go to that most of the coastal plains are barely above sea level. Greene County's highest point is only 138 feet above sea level and Snow Hill where I live although we are at least 90 miles inland is still only 75 feel above sea level. If you can tolerate the trauma of hurricane season, the beaches are great. But I don't think I would want to live any closer to the coast than I do. We get our share of the action as it is.

Last edited by Marka; 04-28-2006 at 08:18 AM.. Reason: merged
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Old 04-28-2006, 08:42 AM
 
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Quote:
...the tree fell and missed the house by 8". How is that for sheer luck? Also the tree was located on the property that was actually owned by the town for a lift station. So they had to pick up the tab for the removal.
You did get lucky! Had it happen to the inlaws too---two...just a few inches from the house & they were HUGE trees. One fell by a back door, & in the driveway, blocking their cars into the yard. They had another fall by the front door. They had to go in/out through the windows, until we got it all cleaned up! And they are both very large people.

I can still remember raking, for weeks. After the first run through (which took days & days) to remove the large debris, every square inch of our properties had to be raked, very carefully. Every stinking square inch. We both have 5 acre yards. There were tiny bits of glass & metal & just everything you could think of, in the grass. Tons of tiny shards. The grass was growing, from all the rain, while we were looking at it. You couldn't mow until it was raked. And then only if you had the gas to spare. It was so hot/humid, with all the water trying to evaporate & the heat. No A/C to rest in & no water to shower with, for 3 weeks. You couldn't sit in the car to cool off for very long, because gas was in horribly short supply--tanker trucks couldn't get in & the stations were sold out. We were nasty, smelly & our hands were blistered horribly from raking. There was so much destruction that you just felt so overwhelmed...and you felt such sadness for those that lost all. No lie, there are still a few properties, even now, that are still working on completely cleaning up their tree damage....They are still knocking around cleaning up/hauling off on weekends. The National Guard turned the airport into a tree debris drop off station, there was so much. A few weeks after the storm, the town was finally able to offer curbside pickup--but they had to rent fleets of trucks, as well as lease services, for it elsewhere, to supplement their own. That went on weekly for 10 months!

We had a lot of hoorah around here after izzy about tree cleanup & when it would be covered by your homeowners insurance...There will so many trees down that it was hardly comprehendable.

You probably already know, but just in case you didn't...I know you'll find this tidbit valuable: If the tree fell (and was on your property) but it did not actually hit the house & cause damage, then you were responsible yourself for the cost of removal & homeowners insurance wouldn't touch it.

That was pretty rough financially if you had a scads of really large old trees down in your yard, as was the case for many here. My inlaws had 6 huge 100+ yr old pecans down & that was a major, major production to clean up & very, very expensive. The tree cleanup folks countrywide showed up & many tried to ream people with outrageous prices (10's of thousands of dollars quoted). Despicable! to take advantage of people like that. There were so many it was hard to police them. Thank goodness, for many with lower incomes, who were elderly & not able to clean up themselves, that church relief groups also came in (local & countrywide) & cleaned up for them free. The Baptist Men's relief groups were a godsend here, as there was far too much damage to clean up amongst ourselves. Even still it took months & months.

sigh....I was only going to write you a quick few sentences, about the insurance tidbit, but got caught up remembering. Forgive me. It was just such a horrific, life altering, nightmare experience. We haven't had a direct hit here since. We all very nervious as the new hurricane season begins, to see what will await us this year.
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Old 04-28-2006, 09:49 AM
 
Location: Snow Hill, NC
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"You probably already know, but just in case you didn't...I know you'll find this tidbit valuable: If the tree fell (and was on your property) but it did not actually hit the house & cause damage, then you were responsible yourself for the cost of removal & homeowners insurance wouldn't touch it."

I didn't know that until Izzy got that 90 + foot tree. And Chris, bless his heart was doing all he could to get it up and then the Mayor came through and said that it was on this small patch of town property that held the lift station. I am not all that sure he was right but since Chris works for the Town Of Snow Hill and he and the mayor are friends, I guess he decided to cut us a break. And I was so relieved. I thought he was going to kill himself out there working on that tree not to mention all the ones that were down in the town that had to be gotten up. So I sure didn't complain. Another thing too, Fran got our privacy fence and the insurance won't cover that either unless it was attached to the house, which it wasn't. And quite frankly, I am worried about the season coming up in about a month. They are saying that the east coast will probably get hit this year with a mind staggering 81% probabilty. The only blessing for us is that they seem to think the storm is going to hit further north than you or I am, even as far as the New Jersey shore or possibly even Cape Cod. The tree that Izzy got was the first tree we had fall from the hurricanes. We lost one the year we moved here from a big storm but the tree was a lot smaller. We went ahead and cut down the pine that was near the bedroom window because it looked like an accident ready to happen.
Sound like you have really been through a lot with these storms. We are lucky in one respect. We are in the city limits. So usually we get power back on pretty quickly. We went without about 2 days with one of them. Fran or Floyd one but that is nothing compared to 2 weeks for some people. We had people coming over asking to bathe their children and take a bath themselves. We fired up a grill and let them cook food that would have gone bad without electricity and I would make potato salad or something in the house. We got some cakes from the grocery store that were slightly out of date for free and fed that to them as well. And can't even remember how much formula I made during Floyd in particular. But one good thing about the storms, it usually brings out the best in people. Or in some cases, the worse. So far we have been blessed with the best. If it gets too "hot" to handle during one of the projected storms, you can come our way. You might still get inconvenienced some but it probably won't be as bad as it would be in your area.
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Old 04-28-2006, 10:05 AM
 
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[ QUOTE]But one good thing about the storms, it usually brings out the best in people. Or in some cases, the worse. So far we have been blessed with the best.[/quote]

Yes, it does bring out the best/worst in people...and I truly don't think you have experienced it to really understand what that statement means. We all helped one another like family...the whole community...except our one @#@($* neighbor...we always knew that about them, but their true colors were blazing, the jerks.

Quote:
If it gets too "hot" to handle during one of the projected storms, you can come our way. You might still get inconvenienced some but it probably won't be as bad as it would be in your area
Your a doll!
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Old 04-28-2006, 11:09 AM
 
Location: Snow Hill, NC
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"...except our one @#@($* neighbor...we always knew that about them, but their true colors were blazing, the jerks."


We had a neighbor like that once. Thank the good Lord he moved and we were blessed with Robert. That is the guy I told you about that went into his above ground pool stark naked at midnight. Oh, let's not forget it was March, air temp was 37 degrees and the pool cover was still on the pool. For whatever reason only known to him, he sees this cement block that has fallen into the pool. He jumps in there butt naked after only pulling enough of the top off to actually do this feat. He is startled by the water's temp and can't function to get out. We get a call a little after midnight from the wife and she is screaming, "Robert is drowning." Chris runs over there in just his underwear and Robert has just about found his way out by this time. I got dressed and went over there and took a look at him since he has a heart condition and I was nurse in the 80's. Gwen has found them a robe a piece by that time. But Robert is a trip. Early 50's, old marine and hippie. Very intelligent man when it comes to finances. Beyond that, the jury is out. He locks himself out of his house so often that I have a key to his house.
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Old 04-28-2006, 02:49 PM
 
Location: Upstate SC
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It's hard to find decent paying jobs in the Wilmington area. I lived there from 1997-2002, and had a pretty good job for the area. Why, you may ask, is it hard to find a decent paying job? The beach. A lot of people will move there just so they can live near the beach, and will work a lower paying job just so they can live there. The area is based on a tourist economy, and those service-based jobs do not generally pay well. I was lucky enough to work for a software company, made decent money for the area and got out in 2002 to move to Asheville, where I make even more money. I remember a few years ago, people got excited about a new Verizon call center, thinking there were going to be a lot of high paying jobs. There weren't, and even of those available, many Verizon employees from the northeast transferred down. As far as schools are concerned, the New Hanover County schools (Wilmington) are decent. Pender County schools are not, and that is probably why someone would choose to school their students in Wilmington. None of the districts in the area are above average, you would have to look in the Charlotte, Raleigh, or Asheville areas for that. I moved from Minnesota to Wilmington in 1997, when my son was in elementary school, and he was head and shoulders above the majority of his classmates once he started in Wilmington. The schools are crowded in NC and conditions are not what they should be, although they are improving.
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