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Old 01-01-2007, 12:21 PM
 
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do they have hurricanes or tornadoes in outer banks
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Old 01-01-2007, 01:12 PM
 
Location: Cary, NC
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Default The Outer Banks

Quote:
Originally Posted by wynettam View Post
do they have hurricanes or tornadoes in outer banks
Hurricanes do visit the Outer Banks. It is a fact of life, and they get hit hard fairly often.
Tornadoes are not a concern.
My cell phone works well.
High speed internet access is available.
People do live there year round, with many families roots going back many generations, but population swells greatly in the summer vacation season.

You should visit.
OBX, Avon Hatteras Island, in particular, is one of my favorite places on Earth. There is almost nothing "to do" there, so one's ability to enjoy relaxing and catching up on reading is a valuable asset.
Most of Hatteras Island is National Park Service operated, including most beachfront. This has controlled much development, and leads to a little strife with long-term permanent residents.
It is a vacation place to fall in love with, but if you need a large town around you, you are likely to be happier elsewhere. Nags Head, Kitty Hawk, Kill Devils Hill area is the largest concentration of year round population, I think due to easiest access to the mainland.

The Outer Banks stretches from just south of the VA/NC line to Portsmouth Island.
Ocracoke Island is the southernmost populated island in the OBX. It is accessible only by ferry or boat.
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Old 01-01-2007, 02:17 PM
 
Location: Blue Ridge Mtns of NC
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An analysis of the climatology of tornadoes in North Carolina for a period of 53 years (1950-2003) is performed using tornado data obtained from the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) and the National Severe Storms Laboratory (NSSL).

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Old 01-01-2007, 02:21 PM
 
Location: Morehead City, NC
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So the statistical range is seeing less than one every 50 years or seeing less than one every year.
Interesting.
Bill
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Old 01-01-2007, 02:23 PM
 
Location: Cary, NC
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Whoops...
But, are these tornadoes not the by-product of hurricanes, as opposed to typical independent "Tornado Alley" activity?
If not, I stand corrected on my "Tornadoes are not a concern."
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Old 01-01-2007, 02:27 PM
 
Location: Blue Ridge Mtns of NC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeJaquish View Post
Whoops...
But, are these tornadoes not the by-product of hurricanes, as opposed to typical independent "Tornado Alley" activity?
If not, I stand corrected on my "Tornadoes are not a concern."
Both, but I agree with you that tornado activity in not much of a concern in NC compared to some other U.S. regions. You're much more likely to be killed or injured by lightning strikes in NC. NC ranks number 4 or 5 for that.

Last edited by mm34b; 01-01-2007 at 02:43 PM..
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Old 01-01-2007, 05:43 PM
 
Location: Morehead City, NC
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As a 25 year resident of the coast of North Carolina, the notion of coastal NC as a hazardous tornado or lightning strike locale really baffled me. Tornado's and lightning are a non-issue.
According to the US National Lightning Detection Center-Coastal NC averages 2 to 4 lightning flashes per square kilometer per year. (http://www.lightningsafety.noaa.gov/images/map.pdf)
So to sum it all up-Cartert County-The coastal tornado hot spot- has less than one tornado a year and a sq.KM has no more than 4 flashes (not even strikes) per year.
Bill
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Old 01-01-2007, 06:08 PM
 
Location: Blue Ridge Mtns of NC
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NC averages around 4 to 5 death per year to lightning. For tornadoes, around 1 to 2 deaths per year. I haven't heard the final tally from the November tornado in Riegelwood, but I think it was 8 deaths. Some years are high and some low or none at all.
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Old 01-02-2007, 06:41 AM
 
Location: Morehead City, NC
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Riegelwood-which is inland of Wilmington about 20 miles- was very much a fluke and not the norm.

To say or imply that coastal NC is a hazardous tornado or lightning strike location is simply wrong. Maybe you are confusing coastal with coastal plains/sandhills which can go some 100+ miles inland from the actual coast
and includes places like Goldsboro and fayetteville.
Heck-Now that I think of it-Sometimes the mountains suffer horrible hurricane damage while we down here on the coast are relatively unscathed. Remeber Hurricanes Frances and Ivan in September 2004??
10+ inches of rain fell on the mountains creating flooding and rock slides while we here on the coast had less than a inch of rain.
http://www.geology.enr.state.nc.us/L..._sept_2004.htm

Bill
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Old 01-02-2007, 07:22 AM
 
Location: Blue Ridge Mtns of NC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Hitchcock View Post
Riegelwood-which is inland of Wilmington about 20 miles- was very much a fluke and not the norm.

To say or imply that coastal NC is a hazardous tornado or lightning strike location is simply wrong. Maybe you are confusing coastal with coastal plains/sandhills which can go some 100+ miles inland from the actual coast
and includes places like Goldsboro and fayetteville.
Heck-Now that I think of it-Sometimes the mountains suffer horrible hurricane damage while we down here on the coast are relatively unscathed. Remeber Hurricanes Frances and Ivan in September 2004??
10+ inches of rain fell on the mountains creating flooding and rock slides while we here on the coast had less than a inch of rain.
http://www.geology.enr.state.nc.us/L..._sept_2004.htm

Bill
Calm down Bill, no one is disputing your statements. If you look at my posts again, I indicated North Carolina, in general.

Last edited by mm34b; 01-02-2007 at 07:32 AM..
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