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Old 01-01-2013, 06:47 PM
 
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Retailers like Macy's increase visitors from neighboring communities, which is good for boosting sales tax revenues. These retailers also make the City more attractive for people, especially professionals who would look to move here. Quality of life essentially.
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Old 01-01-2013, 06:48 PM
 
3,321 posts, read 5,182,656 times
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Originally Posted by BMOREBOY View Post
Macy's would never open in the Greenville market, well unless a income boom happens along with a population boom. I honestly don't even want anymore retail positions in Greenville unless more white collar or high-tech manufacturing companies move in. Retail positions don't create wealth within a city, the jobs I mentioned in the previous sentence do. Greenville leaders are utilizing the cities assets properly.
Exactly, plus those retail positions WILL come, if we get a few high-tech type companies here.
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Old 01-01-2013, 07:16 PM
 
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I would imagine that Macy's would be similar to the Belk store already here...like Belk, they determine what merchandise they stock based on the type of market the store is in. My point is, I could see a Macy's coming here but not a flagship style store.
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Old 01-03-2013, 06:31 AM
 
Location: Greenville, NC
839 posts, read 1,039,165 times
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for those that don't have access to teh Daily Reflector...from yesterday:

Quote:
City talks Town Common development

Daily Reflector, The (Greenville, NC) - Wednesday, January 2, 2013


Since the summer of 1970, local frisbee players, sunbathers and concert-goers have enjoyed the Greenville Town Common's large expanse of grassland next to the Tar River.

Once home to cattle grazers, a popular steamboat landing and an overgrown slum, the gracefully landscaped 12-acre park is seen as historic. It also could be a site for development.

In the weeks and months since returning from an economic development trip to Greenville, S.C., in mid-September, city management has discussed forming a public-private partnership with a capital investor to build on the Town Common at the corner of First and Greene streets.

No proposals have been drawn, but early reports suggest that a hotel or multi-purpose civic building would be erected near the site of the old Sycamore Hill Baptist Church, a landmark chapel lost to arson in the early 1960s.

"There have been discussions about the Town Common in general and how to get it developed - not necessarily a hotel - but what is the mechanism for getting investment," City Manager Barbara Lipscomb said.

Past and present

The Town Common was dedicated as public parkland in June 1970 at the completion of the Shore Drive Redevelopment Project, a four-stage city program covering 67 acres adjacent to the Tar River between Pitt and Reade streets.

To make way for the park and office buildings along First and Second streets, some 250 substandard homes that had no toilets and were rented for $5 a week were razed in the 1960s.

The neighborhood's 1,000 residents were relocated to public housing units in west Greenville, according to historical records.

In 2009, the Greenville City Council adopted a schematic master plan for the Town Common to provide a framework for development at the park and to ensure it achieved its full potential. The document was meant to provide guidance and "remain flexible" to adapt to changes in the social and economic environment.

While the blueprint realized the Town Common should remain publicly owned, it encouraged redevelopment "through carefully constructed agreements," specifically "public-private partnerships."

"You have a $13 (million) to $15 million plan that has never been enacted," said Lipscomb, whose conversation with her administration has centered around one question: "Is the master plan what we need to pull some vibrancy into the park, or do we need to do something different?"

'Revenue generator'

The primary intent of the introduction of a private enterprise in the Town Common is as a "revenue generator" for the city, the master plan states.

The risks and rewards of the contractual agreements would be shared between a public agency and a member of the private sector in a deal in which the skills and assets of each party involved are used to deliver a service or facility to the general public.

The document lists several potential enterprises the city could consider to help finance the redevelopment of the Town Common, provide the city with additional tax base, and spur activity on and around the park.

Among the major projects is a multi-purpose civic building that includes flexible meeting space, kitchen and dining capabilities, an outdoor patio and an interpretive bell tower integrated into the structure to commemorate the Sycamore Hill Baptist Church.
I've also heard rumors about a shoe warehouse coming across from the University Complex out past Hastings Ford. I forget the name but I believe it was the one that is Raleigh that my wife loves to go to.
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Old 01-03-2013, 08:32 AM
 
286 posts, read 552,672 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jpirate View Post
I've also heard rumors about a shoe warehouse coming across from the University Complex out past Hastings Ford. I forget the name but I believe it was the one that is Raleigh that my wife loves to go to.
it isn't either of the big ones in Raleigh (DSW or SRI). I forget the exact name but its like Country Styles or something. There's a sign out there telling what it is.
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Old 01-03-2013, 01:19 PM
 
3,321 posts, read 5,182,656 times
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I am just spitballing here. But what would people think about removing trees on the north side of the river, across from Town Commons? Currently it is wild and unkempt, and under utilized. I am not saying develop it for building, but to turn that bank into another Town Commons.

There is still plenty trees in the rest of River Park North to play in.
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Old 01-03-2013, 02:49 PM
 
1,672 posts, read 2,039,592 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MrBojangles View Post
I am just spitballing here. But what would people think about removing trees on the north side of the river, across from Town Commons? Currently it is wild and unkempt, and under utilized. I am not saying develop it for building, but to turn that bank into another Town Commons.

There is still plenty trees in the rest of River Park North to play in.
I have thought about that, but the occasional flooding needs to go somewhere. Maybe move the boat ramps and fishers off the Town Commons to other side of the river, move the amphitheater over to the current docking area, creating a more picturesque scene with the amphitheater, the river, and the pedestrian bridge. Are they ever going to move the radio tower?

Is there any plan for the remnants of the Mumford Rd. neighborhood?
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Old 01-03-2013, 02:50 PM
 
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Redevelopment Areas in Action: Greenville, NC CED in NC

Story promoted by Uptown Greenville.
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Old 01-04-2013, 12:35 AM
 
1,672 posts, read 2,039,592 times
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Highway 264 Could Become I-264

Possibly an I-264 in the very near future?
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Old 01-04-2013, 02:24 AM
 
Location: Greenville, NC
2,078 posts, read 5,040,450 times
Reputation: 1160
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil A. Delphia View Post
Highway 264 Could Become I-264

Possibly an I-264 in the very near future?
Possibly by today. Apparently the "measure us up" that Greenville officials requested not long ago went very well. I'm confused because there are no shoulders between the Wilson County line and Greenville. Maybe the state has promised to correct that serious deficiency this year?
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