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Old 01-10-2013, 04:24 PM
 
Location: Greenville, NC
2,078 posts, read 5,043,285 times
Reputation: 1160

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Quote:
Originally Posted by MrBojangles View Post
flipping the city's center to the southeast and repositioning it along Dickinson Avenue to directly tie into the 10th Street Connector.

Eaton said the district would start at the intersection of 10th and Evans streets and extend south of Reade Circle, with its western boundaries being the Greenville Transportation and Activity Center, a multi-million dollar regional transit facility to be housed on Bonners Lane.
Someone will have to draw me a map because I can't make any sense of where the area is from this description.

10th and Evans is already south of Reade Cir. How can it extend south of something that is to the north?
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Old 01-10-2013, 07:26 PM
 
3,323 posts, read 5,186,224 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Martin View Post
Someone will have to draw me a map because I can't make any sense of where the area is from this description.

10th and Evans is already south of Reade Cir. How can it extend south of something that is to the north?

I assume it is this. I think they are combining the "Tobacco Warehouse District" and the "Dickinson Avenue district" together.




Here is the official historical district layout.

Tobacco District


Dickinson Avenue District


All the districts. Not sure on this date though.
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Old 01-10-2013, 07:37 PM
 
11 posts, read 21,550 times
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[quote=MrBojangles;27704664]More info about the Dickinson Ave redevelopment from TDR:

The U.S. Department of Justice is moving a federal courthouse from Wilson to Greenville, across from Sheppard Memorial Library, with talks of a $30 million to $40 million office complex going in next door for law officials.


A 30- 40 Million dollar facility is huge! That could be very large office building.
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Old 01-10-2013, 09:03 PM
 
3,286 posts, read 5,436,304 times
Reputation: 1069
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrBojangles View Post
I could see them investing in Dickinson, then allowing "market forces" help backfill the rest of uptown, towards East Carolina.

What is your definition of a skyscraper in Greenville? I mean, we have two 10 story residence halls adjacent to uptown. I don't see why we can't have a six-story or more building uptown, or in Dickinson.

Also, has any official come out and said the ground is too soft? I know everyone says it, but I can't recall an official stating this.
I've never heard of any official reports that the ground is too soft, but it's a fairly common rumor in Greenville. I think it's just a excuse for not having a skyline. If it is in fact true, I wouldn't mind a low-rise skyline with a bunch of 6-10 level buildings. I define a skyscraper or better yet a tower as anything over 12 floors because when I was younger thats what Emporis considered it.

I'm actually shocked they consider a dense downtown a burden, personally I want more traffic and people downtown. But it seems leaders have all of a sudden became serious about making downtown/the west end a vibrant district. With a major university downtown, a major revamp of the area should be fairly easy. I guess city leaders are also attempting to attract more companies to the area as well. I think this year will be a good year for development annoucements.

I wish that development from SHEETZ to Starbucks wasn't constructed. They could've built a four or five story building and put retail slots under it. That would've been a lot more urban compared to the strip mall type development that is there now.

I wonder if I can get involved in anyway to help te city come up with a better master plan or at least spew ideas to councilmen or the mayor. It would be nice to see Vidant invest a few millions into the downtown area for a facility rather its just offices or a small outpatient center. Or even better yet something dealing with Brody.

Well anyways sorry for the rant, I'm just exicted that it seems like some of our ideas are coming true; I can't help but to wonder if the councilmen read our forum from time to time.



[quote=Duracell;27709880]
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrBojangles View Post
More info about the Dickinson Ave redevelopment from TDR:

The U.S. Department of Justice is moving a federal courthouse from Wilson to Greenville, across from Sheppard Memorial Library, with talks of a $30 million to $40 million office complex going in next door for law officials.


A 30- 40 Million dollar facility is huge! That could be very large office building.
Same exact thing I was thinking, that will be a great investment for the area! Too Exciting! I guess the city is planning to demolish some offices near the court rooms to make way for future development.


I know Greenville, SC has been brought up a lot lately by both TDR, City Leaders, and even us on this forum, well for those who have visited before, what do you guys think of their West End district? I could imagine our district being something like there's which includes baseball district, a arts district, good food scene, etc but of course ours wouldn't have the water element. It's sad how both of their districts (West End and Downtown) are better than our Downtown, but it's good to see there striving to improve that.
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Old 01-10-2013, 09:23 PM
 
1,674 posts, read 2,041,419 times
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I, too, sometimes wonder if city planners are checking us out from time to time.

If the ground in Greenville can withstand a four-story parking deck, plus the maximum weight of all the vehicles it's designed to hold, I would suspect that very same ground could tolerate a few 12 to 20 story buildings.

There are a couple of buildings on Dickinson that, if there were just a little more going on around them, I'd like to reside in, doing the downtown-loft-lifestyle.
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Old 01-10-2013, 10:26 PM
 
3,286 posts, read 5,436,304 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil A. Delphia View Post
I, too, sometimes wonder if city planners are checking us out from time to time.

If the ground in Greenville can withstand a four-story parking deck, plus the maximum weight of all the vehicles it's designed to hold, I would suspect that very same ground could tolerate a few 12 to 20 story buildings.

There are a couple of buildings on Dickinson that, if there were just a little more going on around them, I'd like to reside in, doing the downtown-loft-lifestyle.
I really wouldn't be too surprised if they were reading it, it seems like too many of our ideas are on paper right now to deny it. I mean this thread has well over 200,000 views now, so I'm sure they've looked a few times when we're actually discussing development. With all the new talks of development downtown I may start a downtown development dedicated thread and let this one continue to be just a spot for talks of the Greenville area. But it all depends if any more announcements come.

I use to live in a downtown loft, def liked the relax lifestyle only thing about the older buildings is that they have huge 'water bugs' (I consider them roaches) that pretty much can't be removed. I use to see one everyday mind you we kept the place clean; there just there I guess.

And I was thinking the same thing regarding the garage. Have you ever heard the rumor that MrBojangles (as much as I dislike Bojangles back in NC, I could really go for a Cheddar Bo' Biscuit right now LOL) and I were talking about? The one about the ground being too soft? It would be a sight to see a 20-level building in downtown Greenville, living up here in DC I've gotten use to seeing skyscrapers (well not in the city proper but rather the suburbs in MD & VA) and cranes everywhere I go, but it def would be a sight to see down there. Especially with a crown feature. Ah, I love to dream!
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Old 01-11-2013, 06:51 AM
 
3,323 posts, read 5,186,224 times
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With construction, there is destruction. HorizInn Studios and Suites located at 2710 S Memorial Drive was torn down. It was right north of the USPS and south of the Kangaroo. It sounded like a haven for the underworld.

There is a couple of dozen places that need the bulldozer treatment, I can think of right now.
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Old 01-11-2013, 07:04 AM
 
286 posts, read 552,891 times
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One of the last owners of HorizInn really tried. They made upgrades and I even heard some advertising on the FM talk station. But that's an old hotel and a terrible location. The "desirable" clientele won't stay in that part of town.
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Old 01-11-2013, 08:16 AM
 
11 posts, read 21,550 times
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The Herritage at Arlington Apartment complex is almost complete (as far as the exterior). This project is located at the intersection of Arlington and W.5th Street. I believe this project will consist of two-phases (another phase in the future).
Home

The Residence Inn at Moye Blvd. and W. 5th Street looks really good, exterior work looks 80% complete. Iwould expect that the parking areas and ground work will start soon.

The Town Common development idea is meeting sever opposition see the article posted today by TDR:

Town Common development criticized
The Daily Reflector
Friday, January 11, 2013

Members of the Greenville Recreation and Parks Commission criticized city administration this week for considering the Town Common for future development, one saying the idea was disrespectful to the people who once lived there.
Commission member Terry Boardman suggested a motion that the board would be “very opposed” to putting any type of structure on the Town Common, until a “significant vetting of information” was made among all members of the community.
However, commissioners decided to wait until a more appropriate time to make a recommendation, as no proposals have been submitted for Town Common construction.
City management only has said it has discussed acting on the Town Common’s $15 million Master Plan and building a multi-purpose civic building — which some interpret as a hotel — at the corner of First and Greene streets, near where the old Sycamore Hill Baptist building once stood.
“The Town Common is an asset to this community and should stay as it is and improved as a public facility,” Recreation and Parks Commissioner Terry Boardman said of the 12-acre park that separates the Tar River from downtown Greenville.
Boardman said he personally would not like to see Greenville become like New Bern “with a big building slap right on top of the river” and that people he has spoken to are laughing at administration for even considering the idea.
Fellow commissioner, Freddie Outterbridge, took a more stern approach to the issue, condemning the idea as one that would cover up a historical area of Greenville and destroy the memories of the many people who once called the Town Common home.
The Town Common was dedicated as public parkland in June 1970 at the completion of the Shore Drive Redevelopment Project, a four-stage city program covering 67 acres adjacent to the Tar River between Pitt and Reade streets.
To make way for the park and office buildings along First and Second streets, some 250 substandard homes were razed and the neighborhood’s 1,000 residents were relocated to public housing units in Greenville, according to historical records.
“That is a place where a lot of people grew up, and I would hate to see it taken away to build a hotel to look over the Tar River,” Outterbridge said.
Outterbridge said the commission in 2009 worked tirelessly to map out a future for the Town Common that celebrated the property’s past, while embracing its future.
While Greenville Recreation and Parks Director Gary Fenton acknowledged there have been ideas tossed about by the city’s Community Development Department for Town Common development, he assured Outterbridge the historical aspect of the park would “not be lost.”
“Not necessarily every detail of a master plan is going to become reality,” Fenton said. “It is a guiding document that helps you determine what should and should not occur at your facility and I would not say any of the plan is etched in stone.”
Although Fenton said he was pleased city leaders have recognized the Town Common as important to the redevelopment of downtown, he said he has mixed emotions about public-private partnerships negotiated over public parkland.
“The Town Common certainly is a different kind of park than any other in the city,” Fenton said. “It’s our central park. It’s everybody park.”
Fenton said Greenville is blessed to have the Town Common, as many communities only have a piece of public parkland downtown that is 3 or 4 acres and lacks access to a river.
Fenton commented the Town Common is under-used — a major pro to its redevelopment — but said to actually implement any plans is going to take “some miracle,” with a large investment from an extremely wealthy company or individual or many small contributions made from multiple funding sources.
District 1 Councilwoman Kandie Smith, who serves as the council liaison to the commission, reminded the board that many people are going to talk — and give their view — on development in the city. But she cautioned them that all talk is opinion and not a final plan.
“What we have to do is not jump the gun on what we think might happen,” Smith said to the commission. “If we do that, we would be in a world of mess when it comes to building the city as a whole.”
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Old 01-11-2013, 08:25 AM
 
286 posts, read 552,891 times
Reputation: 172
I don't believe they should redevelop the Town Common. I don't get why this big push to do so, either. Did no one notice the huge debacle regarding Dix Hill in Raleigh as Perdue was on the way out? Other cities would kill for a property like that.

I would have thought Marion Blackburn would have to be hospitalized after hearing of plans to develop downtown's only real green space but I haven't even heard pushback from her. It's odd.
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