U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > North Carolina > Coastal North Carolina
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
 
Old 06-13-2013, 04:27 PM
 
711 posts, read 529,433 times
Reputation: 382
The majority of this project is apartments, but with it being the first private builder to significantly invest downtown, it seems like the city would almost have to approve the grant as an indicator to other investors that the city will reciprocate on the business side of laying roots downtown.

From the DR:



The Greenville City Council tonight will consider the first request under its new Capital Investment Grant program, designed to provide economic incentives for businesses and projects to start or grow in the city.

Also during the meeting at 7 p.m. at City Hall, council members will vote on a resolution to adopt the city’s 2013-14 budget.

The capital investment grant request from Taft-Ward ECU Campus Edge Apartments, LLC, would support the mixed-use commercial “Georgetown Redevelopment Project” in the block bounded by Reade Circle to the north, Evans Street to the west, Eighth Street to the south, and Cotanche Street to the east.

The property is within the center city revitalization area and economic development investment zone.

Plans for the site call for 300,000 square feet of commercial residential space (apartments), roughly 11,000 square feet of retail space, and a 429-space parking deck.

The total investment in the project is expected to approach $42 million.

The city’s grant to Taft-Ward would be equivalent to 49.5 percent of the incremental increase in tax revenue for the project. The dollar amount would not exceed $75,000 per year. Taft-Ward is asking that the grant be paid over a period of seven years for a total amount not to exceed $525,000.

Also on the agenda: In addition to the $84.8 million dollar city budget, the proposed resolution also will establish the 2013-14 fiscal year budgets for Sheppard Memorial Library ($2.4 million), the Pitt-Greenville Convention and Visitors Authority ($976,334) and Greenville Utilities Commission ($281.2 million). The city’s manual of fees also will require council approval for adoption.

The budget has not received blanket approval from the council. Members Calvin Mercer and Marion Blackburn have expressed concerns about drawing down the city’s general fund to help finance some capital projects, including construction of a downtown parking deck, a project that received council approval on Monday. City staff also have recommended approval of an ordinance requested by the University Neighborhood Revitalization Initiative Committee to amend on-street parking restrictions for controlled residential parking areas in the area north of East Carolina University.

The proposed revisions will allow the city to implement controlled parking Monday through Friday from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. without requiring a petition signed by at least 51 percent of the residents, which has been the policy to date. The signs would cost an estimated $18,000. City staff will present results of a follow-up downtown Greenville traffic calming pilot study. The post study has been performed to determine if the application of certain traffic control devices met the goals of a traffic calming project.

The original study was presented in February by the police and public works departments to assist in traffic control without restricting vehicular access.

A series of traffic control devices were deployed at key locations within the study area and speed and volume data were collected.

City staff said the devices have achieved the desired goals and the police and public works departments have recommended that they be made permanent. The council also will consider Councilman Mercer’s request that they explore the possibility of pursuing a N. C. Department of Commerce certified retirement community designation.

The application fee for the Certified Retirement Community designation is $10,000 or 50 cents per capita, whichever is greater. Based on Greenville’s population, the application fee would be approximately $43,000.

The application, if approved, would be filed in January.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 06-13-2013, 09:05 PM
 
30 posts, read 23,020 times
Reputation: 11
A Dollar Tree store is going into the shopping strip at the new Walmart.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-14-2013, 06:33 AM
 
136 posts, read 92,779 times
Reputation: 38
More Development news from the paper:

Quote:
Greenville will attempt to transform its urban core in the midst of a tight fiscal climate, relying on its redevelopment commission to get the job done, city planners said.

At the City Council meeting Monday, Assistant City Manager Chris Padgett presented the Greenville Redevelopment Commission’s annual work plans for fiscal year 2013-14. In the year ahead, the commission will try to continue with its west Greenville and Center City business development programs while seeking opportunities to spur private investment in additional phases of public commitments, he said.


Of the 12 items outlined in the plan, five are priority initiatives for the commission, believed to be vital to urban core redevelopment. Much of the funding will have to be cultivated with additional public-private commitments and improving real estate market conditions, Padgett said.

West Fifth streetscape

The RDC will develop funding opportunities for phase two of the streetscape. The West Fifth Street gateway (from Memorial Drive to Cadillac Street) was completed in 2011. The commission and City Council selected a segment of West Fifth running from Cadillac Street to Tyson Street as the second phase.

A key feature there will be the realignment of the intersection of West 14th and Tyson streets. This portion is being designed with a $60,000 bond, and the construction cost is estimated at $1.25 million.

West Greenville commercial center/Business Incubator

The Center City-west Greenville revitalization plan calls for a small scale commercial center to serve the west Greenville neighborhoods, Padgett said. It might include a mix of retail and office uses and additional space for other commercial ventures, as well as office space for a small business incubator.

The RDC has acquired most of a two-block area along West Fifth from Davis Street to Pamlico Avenue, which it believes might be a viable incubator site, Padgett said. The commissioners believe there is a strong opportunity for a public and private partnership with this project. Predevelopment would use $20,000 in bond funds and another $204,994 of bond funds for acquisition.

Dickinson Avenue area redevelopment

Several redevelopment projects are being planned or are in the pipeline for the Dickinson Avenue area, Padgett said, including the federal courthouse and a transportation activity center.

Pitt Street is being considered as a location for the center, which would support the community’s goal of promoting transportation-oriented development in the Dickinson/Tobacco district, Padgett said.

The city and NCDOT are pursuing a design consultant to complete a detailed streetscape plan for Dickinson between Reade Circle and the future route of the 10th Street connector, Padgett said.

Dickinson Avenue is expected to become the pedestrian-friendly spine of a district, rather than a vehicular-oriented through-corridor, he said.

That segment of the corridor “sets the character for the entire redevelopment of the Tobacco Warehouse District,” according to the Streetscape master plan.

The RDC also oversaw the city’s use of Brownfields (environmental) program funds to complete redevelopment planning for the former Imperial Warehouse site for mixed use, Padgett said.

The combined districts show potential to become arts, restaurant, residential, and cultural districts, he said. Dickinson Avenue Streetscape planning would implement a $150,000 Center City bond, and the Reade and Dickinson commercial corridor design would use a $90,000 Center City bond.

First Street redevelopment, Town Common master plan

The RDC will engage residents in the coming year in a dialogue about possibilities for First Street and Town Common redevelopment. The future direction of the Town Common is a subject that has the potential to create policy disagreements, Padgett said, but also to galvanize economic development in the urban core and increase the city’s tax base.

The Center City-west Greenville revitalization plan calls for “improvement of the open space in the Town Common to leverage other adjacent residential and commercial projects” and the “development of medium to high density residential units south of First Street.”

The commissioners view the Town Common Master Plan as a document to guide improvements to the park and surrounding areas in the years ahead, Padgett said. Implementation of the plan, however, is expected to cost as much as $13 million, which is not yet available.

The First Street corridor will be narrowed with excess road right-of-way reallocated toward on-street parking. As additional funding becomes available, such an approach can be expanded to include full streetscaping of the park’s frontage along First Street, Padgett said. The immediate positive effects would include additional parking for community festivals, Greenway and Town Common recreation and concerts at the amphitheater. Those accomplishments could contribute to the longer-range goals of making First Street attractive to private redevelopment, he said.

Urban real estate development professionals have made it clear to city staff that private investment in the First Street corridor is unlikely to happen unless a major “draw” or anchor is developed there or at the Town Common, Padgett told the council.

For the near future, the prospects of significant redevelopment on the First Street corridor are unfavorable, until baseline conditions improve, city staff said. The commission will invite the community, stakeholders and partners to talk about ways to promote First Street and Town Common redevelopment.

First Street parking striping would be accomplished using $20,000 of Center City bond funds.

Downtown ‘draw’

The RDC plans to discuss with city staff, redevelopment partners and the public ways to identify and support the creation of activity anchors that would draw greater numbers of shoppers, tourists, businesses and private investment to the Greenville urban core.
I wonder what the "draw" could be. I know a baseball stadium has been mentioned. Honestly, I would like a baseball stadium/performing arts center combo (similar to the Durham Tobacco District). These are exciting times for Greenville!

Last edited by michealbond; 06-14-2013 at 07:18 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-14-2013, 11:10 AM
 
Location: Greenville, NC
1,644 posts, read 2,412,248 times
Reputation: 644
Quote:
Originally Posted by michealbond View Post
I wonder what the "draw" could be. I know a baseball stadium has been mentioned. Honestly, I would like a baseball stadium/performing arts center combo (similar to the Durham Tobacco District). These are exciting times for Greenville!
I would only support a stadium if a team can be secured to a very long term, penalized to death if they break it, lease. The last thing Greenville needs is some big elephant downtown that is not being used and falls into disrepair.

I don't understand why anybody would want this anyway. The majority of MLB teams have trouble filling the stands. Minor league teams don't stand a chance of filling the stands. Baseball is not the glory game it once was.

5 Types of People who Still Watch Baseball on TV
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-14-2013, 11:27 AM
 
711 posts, read 529,433 times
Reputation: 382
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Martin View Post
I would only support a stadium if a team can be secured to a very long term, penalized to death if they break it, lease. The last thing Greenville needs is some big elephant downtown that is not being used and falls into disrepair.

I don't understand why anybody would want this anyway. The majority of MLB teams have trouble filling the stands. Minor league teams don't stand a chance of filling the stands. Baseball is not the glory game it once was.

5 Types of People who Still Watch Baseball on TV
That's an opinion piece on people who go to baseball games and that tv ratings are down (The pics and the writing don't match anyway.). I don't get it.

As far as tv and baseball goes, regardless of ratings, MLB's tv revenue is skyrocketing. How does any of that relates to a minor league team in Greenville? It doesn't. Minor league baseball is a business, and franchises are always looking to be in strong or growing markets while avoiding and moving out of decaying markets - like Kinston. At some point some owner will want to move or sell their team because their town is in a rut or they won't build a new facility for them, and Greenville is one of the healthier markets in this region without a team. Wilmington has proven more than once that they won't build a stadium, so owners won't bother with them anymore; so Greenville looks even better as a possibility to do business as a new minor league market.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-14-2013, 02:07 PM
 
Location: Winston-Salem, NC
631 posts, read 687,213 times
Reputation: 227
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr Bret Wickstrom View Post
The last thing Greenville needs is more fast food. Greenville needs more locally owned small business food. Went to Chef and the Farmer last weekend in Kinston. WOW! It's sad that as big as Greenville is that is has nothing even in the same league. We need more high quality (not necessarily expensive) local and fresh food places to eat from. The fast food options here are not lacking.
We went to Chef and the Farmer several years ago (around 2007 or so) when we lived in Greenville - loved the restaurant.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-14-2013, 02:08 PM
 
Location: Winston-Salem, NC
631 posts, read 687,213 times
Reputation: 227
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrBojangles View Post
Mark your calender, Community Open House for the new Children's Hospital.
https://www.facebook.com/events/129656667232533/
I work for a company that did some of the interior work at the children's hospital. Looks like they (we...lol) did a great job!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-15-2013, 10:20 AM
 
711 posts, read 529,433 times
Reputation: 382
The reschedule for the Davenport Rd. construction is June 17-21.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-16-2013, 08:54 PM
 
136 posts, read 92,779 times
Reputation: 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Martin View Post
I would only support a stadium if a team can be secured to a very long term, penalized to death if they break it, lease. The last thing Greenville needs is some big elephant downtown that is not being used and falls into disrepair.

I don't understand why anybody would want this anyway. The majority of MLB teams have trouble filling the stands. Minor league teams don't stand a chance of filling the stands. Baseball is not the glory game it once was.

5 Types of People who Still Watch Baseball on TV
Well...

Over 220,000 tickets have been purchased this year for Durham Bulls games. Almost 100,000 tickets have been purchased for the Carolina Mudcats in Zebulon. 142,000 for the team in Winston-Salem. 178,000 tickets for the Greensboro team. Multiply it by a price of at least 5 bucks and you're looking at several hundred thousand dollars, over 1 million in the case of Durham. And the season is only halfway done. Add in the concession and souvenir sales, and you're looking at a lot of money generated for the team each year. There are jobs that are created from the games..ticket takers, concession stand operators, security, etc.

A place like the American Tobacco District has several shops and restaurants that are open within 50 feet of the stadium. Many times people will want to eat before or after the game (Not everyone wants hot dogs and peanuts). This helps those restaurants in the area. Something similar could be done in Greenville.

It gives individuals, groups, and families a chance to actually do something that won't break the bank. A night out for a family of 4 at a baseball game can be very inexpensive compared to an afternoon or evening at the movies. It would give the people of Greenville and surrounding areas something fun to do in the evenings during the summer. Currently there are 2 options...go to the movies or go to a bar to drink. Baseball may not be the glory sport that it used to be, but it's still an American tradition that I think would be successful in Greenville.

I don't think that a baseball stadium would go unused in Greenville. Regional & national youth tournaments could be played at the park. The city little league and American Legion tournaments could be held there. It could also double as an amphitheater for some Sunday in the Park groups, Pirate Fest bands and national acts. People have complained about the lack of a live music amphitheater. This could help kill 2 birds with 1 stone.

I don't see why anyone wouldn't want this to be built.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-16-2013, 10:14 PM
 
Location: Silver Spring, MD
2,795 posts, read 2,627,371 times
Reputation: 793
Quote:
Originally Posted by michealbond View Post
Well...

Over 220,000 tickets have been purchased this year for Durham Bulls games. Almost 100,000 tickets have been purchased for the Carolina Mudcats in Zebulon. 142,000 for the team in Winston-Salem. 178,000 tickets for the Greensboro team. Multiply it by a price of at least 5 bucks and you're looking at several hundred thousand dollars, over 1 million in the case of Durham. And the season is only halfway done. Add in the concession and souvenir sales, and you're looking at a lot of money generated for the team each year. There are jobs that are created from the games..ticket takers, concession stand operators, security, etc.

A place like the American Tobacco District has several shops and restaurants that are open within 50 feet of the stadium. Many times people will want to eat before or after the game (Not everyone wants hot dogs and peanuts). This helps those restaurants in the area. Something similar could be done in Greenville.

It gives individuals, groups, and families a chance to actually do something that won't break the bank. A night out for a family of 4 at a baseball game can be very inexpensive compared to an afternoon or evening at the movies. It would give the people of Greenville and surrounding areas something fun to do in the evenings during the summer. Currently there are 2 options...go to the movies or go to a bar to drink. Baseball may not be the glory sport that it used to be, but it's still an American tradition that I think would be successful in Greenville.

I don't think that a baseball stadium would go unused in Greenville. Regional & national youth tournaments could be played at the park. The city little league and American Legion tournaments could be held there. It could also double as an amphitheater for some Sunday in the Park groups, Pirate Fest bands and national acts. People have complained about the lack of a live music amphitheater. This could help kill 2 birds with 1 stone.

I don't see why anyone wouldn't want this to be built.
I completely agree with this assesment, I believe others would as well but the funding is always in question. I've never been to any minor-league baseball stadiums, but I've been to 'The West End' in Greenville and its booming not only because of their downtown, but also because of the baseball stadium along with one of the best urban parks and bridges in the nation. I don't mind giving out tax-incentives for someone else to build the stadium, I just don't want the city to build it.

I want our district to be a mixture of The West End in Greenville, SC, and a urban and mini version of the Triangle Research Park.

http://www.westendgreenville.com/index.php
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:




Over $79,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > North Carolina > Coastal North Carolina
Similar Threads

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top