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Old 07-08-2013, 06:45 AM
 
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Looks like there was a follow up to the "Outdoor dining" policy for Uptown Greenville. From what I read, it seems like there was already a fee/procedure in place that many businesses might not have been following?

Quote:
Greenville has studied examples of vibrant outdoor dining spaces in cities like Raleigh, Durham and Wilmington.

Now city officials will meet with local business owners to discuss their vision and to get input on a new outdoor dining policy.


The meeting will take place on Wednesday at 3:30 p.m. at Winslow’s, according to Uptown Greenville Director Bianca Shoneman. City Planner Chantae Gooby, Economic Development Officer Carl Rees and Merrill Flood, community development director, will attend to answer questions and hear any concerns, Shoneman said.

Flood said when the city looked to create outdoor dining permits, officials studied larger cities to try to accomplish the same success.

“The idea for the downtown area is that we have a number of great business partners, and the idea of having outdoor dining is one aspect of a downtown revitalization plan supported by the city as a whole,” Flood said. “So we wanted to create a vehicle to make it happen as opposed to a process that turned people off.”

Flood said he would not look at the new permits as regulations since prior to their implementation the only way to have outdoor dining on city property was to have a $500 encroachment agreement, which was “a much longer, more troublesome process.”

“The idea was that we wanted to have more (outdoor dining), but because it’s in the public right of way, there has to be some level of standards to ensure public access is maintained,” Flood said. “We want more of this; we want access by the public to use outdoor dining wherever possible.”

Flood said the desire for increased outdoor dining downtown has to match up with ensuring that public travel is not impeded.

“I think there’s an opportunity for both to coexist because of these permits,” he said.

During the city’s study of Raleigh, Durham and Wilmington, Flood said local officials found that Greenville permit fee is “pretty much in line or cheaper” than the fee in other cities.

Regulations attached to the permits, like no umbrellas, all metal furniture, no music and furniture being brought in at night, were all meant to increase safety and discourage loitering and vandalism.

Flood said bringing furniture in each night will discourage vandalism, and not allowing umbrellas will keep them from becoming a hazard during windy conditions.

“We wouldn’t want to see these things blowing down the street,” Flood said.

As for policing of the outdoor dining policies, Flood said he “wouldn’t say there are penalties” for noncompliance.

“We’re not in the penalty business with this,” he said. “This is a standard for everyone and there will be annual reviews. We’re trying to encourage this kind of activity downtown and the last thing we would want to do is attach a penalty to this.”

Raleigh and Durham specifically forbid plastic and unfinished or pressure-treated wood furnishings in outdoor dining, Flood said. Wilmington does not regulate furniture material.

The Tipsy Teapot, 409 S. Evans St., no longer has outdoor dining outside of the restaurant, where owner Delia Liuzza has served customers for more than eight years.

In previous interviews, Liuzza said she felt the permits were unreasonable and unfairly singled out her business, which could not easily afford the new $150 permit, any fines related to noncompliance or to close down outdoor dining.

A member of the Tipsy Teapot staff, Katie McKiney, said the restaurant does not have outdoor dining “for now,” and all furniture has been moved from city property.

McKiney said she was not sure when or if tables, chairs and umbrellas that made up the restaurant’s outdoor dining area would return. The restaurant has set potted plants outside.

If a business is in violation of the outdoor dining policies or fails to obtain either a permit or an encroachment agreement, the first step isn’t a citation, Flood said.

“We’re not going to go out there and fine them immediately,” Flood said. “The first step would be a warning, asking them to come into compliance and letting them know how to do that or a letter advising them of the activity they’re participating in that requires a permit and how to go about getting one.”

Flood said in his 25-plus years in Greenville, that nine out of 10 businesses comply with city ordinances, such as the permits for outdoor dining.

“I’m confident based on input from downtown merchants that they’ll comply,” Flood said. “They want just as much as we do to have a clean, neat environment where they can engage in profitable activities.”

In the history of business downtown, Flood said there’s been “an active exchange of information” between the city and local merchants and that downtown businesses have “pretty much policed themselves” over the years.

“I’ve never known a business not to be willing to work with the city when it comes to things like this,” he said.

“They’re very willing to work with the required process and I think they do a good job of that,” he said.

In the end, Flood said, a business that wants to use city property for outdoor dining must either have an encroachment agreement or an outdoor dining permit.

“They must have one or the other.”

Shoneman said the goal is to have Greenville strive to achieve the same kind of atmosphere as larger cities.

“When we think of great urban spaces ... we often think of sitting outside, eating a great meal, sipping a drink, watching the life of the city pass by,” Shoneman said. “It’s a tradition of city life. This policy moves Greenville closer to that life.”
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Old 07-09-2013, 09:47 AM
 
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According to the Reflector, the Demolition phase is in effect for the 10th Street connector. Right of way acquisition has been better than expected due to many of the offers on home being accepted by residents. Settlement has already been reached on 137 of the 193 properties.

Ten to 12 properties have been cleared, Askew said, including several on Myrtle Street, Watauga Avenue, Farmville Boulevard, Chestnut Street, 14th Street, Terrace Avenue and Columbia Avenue.
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Old 07-09-2013, 02:55 PM
 
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http://finance.yahoo.com/news/kroger...114456708.html

Harris Teeter Was Purchased By Krogers; its kind of funny that the newest Harris Teeter in Greenville was once a Kroger and when Harris Teeter finally decides to purchase the old Kroger it yet again becomes a Kroger.
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Old 07-09-2013, 04:19 PM
 
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I think the study on outdoor dining was not a very productive one. There is only 1 business that i know of that had outdoor dining in the right of way of pedestrians (tipsy teapot).
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Old 07-09-2013, 04:48 PM
 
Location: Greenville, NC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BMORE View Post
Kroger to buy Harris Teeter for about $2.44B - Yahoo! Finance

Harris Teeter Was Purchased By Krogers; its kind of funny that the newest Harris Teeter in Greenville was once a Kroger and when Harris Teeter finally decides to purchase the old Kroger it yet again becomes a Kroger.
Kroger has not yet purchased HT. HT is no longer permitted to shop the company around but it can still take offers. Publix and Ahold are 2 companies that may yet be the actual purchaser. If the deal falls through due to a higher bidder Kroger gets $75 mill in cash.

Kroger also has a history of keeping the original names of companies that it buys out so there stands a good chance that the Harris Teeters will remain Harris Teeters, if Kroger can close the deal.

This article contains a video from Kroger's CFO and he explains everything in some detail.

Kroger Agrees to Buy Grocer Harris Teeter for $2.5 Billion - Bloomberg
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Old 07-09-2013, 04:58 PM
 
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Kroger said they're not rebranding any of the Teeters. Whether or not that's what actually happens remains to be seen.
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Old 07-10-2013, 05:34 AM
 
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Noticed a sign for Which Wich Superior Sandwiches on the corner unit of the new mattress store by Bonefish. Also confirmed on their website.
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Old 07-10-2013, 06:13 AM
 
Location: Greenville, NC
839 posts, read 1,039,268 times
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Daily Grind has closed
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Old 07-10-2013, 12:39 PM
 
Location: Winston-Salem, NC
1,255 posts, read 2,105,692 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jpirate View Post
Daily Grind has closed
That's a shame. It seemed to do quite well - but we haven't lived in Greenville for 4 years now.
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Old 07-10-2013, 01:19 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jpirate View Post
Daily Grind has closed
I've been there a few times. It seems that many people had an issue with the service they received more than the food there. According to online reviews on sites like Yelp or Foursquare, it's not surprising that this placed has closed.

Hopefully, another restaurant will take it's place.


Side note: Since moving to Raleigh about year ago, I was recently able to attend the Triangle Restaurant Week at a couple of restaurants around here. It's a really neat way to enjoy the city's more "Upscale" establishments at an affordable price. I think it would be an awesome way to drum up business for the various Greenville restaurants or maybe Uptown Greenville could start something similar.

CPW's, University Chophouse, Villedge, Winslow's, Copper & Vine, etc. could all offer a special Menu for a week that includes a $15 or $20 per person 3 or 4 course meal. Or a "Two for $20" option like some of the larger chain restaurants are using. It's pretty popular in the Triangle area and I know lots of other cities around the country.

Heh, just an idea.
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