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Old 12-30-2013, 11:23 AM
 
36 posts, read 53,704 times
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Quick question...I have seen work being done in the old Curcuit City bld and heard a rumor that it was going to be a Dave&Busters! Does anyone have anyone have any info about what is going in there?!?!
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Old 12-30-2013, 11:39 AM
 
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Ok..addendum to my previous post..talked to someone else who said they spoke to a construction guy working there and he said it was being torn out and divided up into 3 smaller shops..so I really don't know!
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Old 12-30-2013, 11:53 AM
 
Location: Greenville, NC
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Originally Posted by ecusmitty View Post
Quick question...I have seen work being done in the old Curcuit City bld and heard a rumor that it was going to be a Dave&Busters! Does anyone have anyone have any info about what is going in there?!?!
It will be a very long time before you see a Dave and Busters in Greenville, NC. The company requires a 700,000 to 1,000,000 person daytime population within 10 miles before they will build. On Greenville's busiest day there's only about 125,000 people (give or take a few thousand) within 10 miles of Greenville.
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Old 12-30-2013, 12:35 PM
 
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Thx..good to know..really wished we had something like a D&B though..don't really need more food places but do need more entertainment options in G'ville!
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Old 12-30-2013, 05:41 PM
 
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ECU Physicians, East Carolina Neurology merge


ECU Physicians is now offering neurology care following a merger with East Carolina Neurology, a private physician practice in Greenville.

ECN, established in 1977 by Dr. Gregg Hardy and Dr. Frank Fleming and now a 12-physician group, joined the Brody School of Medicine during the summer. Its physicians are full-time clinical faculty of the new division of neurology within the Department of Internal Medicine at Brody. Through this appointment, ECN also has joined ECU Physicians, the school’s group medical practice.

ECN physicians will continue to see patients at their 24,000-square-foot practice at 2280 Hemby Lane and at their magnetic resonance imaging site at 402 Bowman Gray Drive. The practice sites will be called ECU Physicians Neurology and ECU Physicians MRI.

“I think this is a great opportunity for collaboration that will help the patients of eastern North Carolina,” Dr. Paul Bolin, chairman of the Department of Internal Medicine at the Brody School of Medicine, said.

ECU and ECN have worked closely for years. Physicians at the practice have hosted medical students on clinical rotations and have held adjunct appointments at the school.

Late in 2010, physicians at the practice approached Bolin about developing a closer relationship. By the following summer, talks had turned to a formal merger.

ECU and ECN leaders believed the time was right to combine their clinical programs and begin to develop multidisciplinary centers that ultimately will join other research and academic programs in the neurosciences at ECU and provide the next block in the building of a neurosciences institute.

Dr. Don Price of the neurology practice said today’s health care environment made joining ECU a good business decision.

“The leadership of (the Brody School of Medicine) has encouraged us to continue our tradition of patient service, teaching and clinical research,” he said. “Performing this work with the resources of ECU will be an added bonus for our patients and our staff.”

Price and Drs. Frank Fleming, Gregg Hardy, Robert Frere, John Gibbs, Shawnna Patterson, Rukmini Menon, Eric Lindzen, Dmitri Kolychev and Tony Breuer and pediatric neurologists Susan Boutilier and Christine Burch are now faculty members at the Brody School of Medicine. More than 70 ECN staff members were offered permanent positions at ECU.

The practice treats patients with neurological disorders such as stroke, Parkinson’s disease, multiple sclerosis and headache. Pediatric neurologists treat children with neurological problems, and the practice provides 24-hour coverage for neurology services at Vidant Medical Center. It has an average of 18 inpatients daily and in 2011 had 3,556 patient admissions.

Bringing expertise in neurological diseases such as stroke to ECU Physicians is an important step, Bolin said.

“Stroke is a problem everywhere, but it is a huge problem in eastern North Carolina,” he said. The state is often referred to as “the buckle of the stroke belt.”

Bolin said one goal is to create an “umbrella of stroke coverage” for eastern North Carolina that includes a “telestroke” system that beams computed tomography scans of patients to neurologists for fast diagnosis. He also wants to standardize stroke care.

Bolin also said the practice has a tradition of research and education. ECN physicians have led educational lectures at VMC and have received teaching awards from ECU medical students.

A neurology residency training program at ECU also is a possibility, he said.

Making the practice a part of ECU was time-consuming, said Brian Jowers, executive director of ECU Physicians. The school had to apply to the state for a certificate of need to acquire the practice’s MRI and CT scanners.

“It was a lot of work, but it’s been a worthwhile thing,” Jowers said. “They’ll bring ideas to us that will help us make our practice better.”

The practice also is adopting ECU’s electronic health record and billing procedures, “but we did not restructure the way they take care of patients at all,” he said.

ECU Physicians acquired the practice and the equipment, including the imaging machines. The ECU Foundation bought the buildings and is leasing them to ECU Physicians.

In 2008, the school and Eastern Neurosurgical and Spine Associates merged. The Brody School of Medicine also has several basic science faculty members who are published experts in neuroscience.

“The physicians and staff are looking forward to our new relationship with ECU,” Price said.

He added that joining the medical school could help recruit neurologists, especially those who subspecialize. Approximately 20 neurologists practice in the 29-county region of eastern North Carolina that Vidant Health serves, according to Joe Hodges, administrator of the neurology practice.

The practice provides specialty clinics for patients who have had a stroke and who have Parkinson’s disease, ALS, multiple sclerosis, vestibular/dizziness disorders, headache, sleep disorders and epilepsy.

The practice has provided medical direction for the Vidant sleep center since it opened several years ago. The future of that center and how the neurologists might become part of the ECU Physicians sleep center are under discussion, Jowers said.

Nearly 95 percent of ECN patients have some form of private or government insurance. Jowers expects the practice to contribute more than $1.5 million after expenses to ECU Physicians’ income by 2015.
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Old 12-30-2013, 05:51 PM
 
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GUC to relocate power lines

Greenville Utilities’ Board of Commissioners signed off on plans to relocate utilities in the 10th Street connector construction area beginning early next year.

The work will start with the relocation and raising of electric utilities, said Roger Jones, GUC’s director of electric systems, during the board’s Thursday meeting.

The work with cost about $1.5 million, he said, and the N.C. Department of Transportation will compensate GUC, Jones said.

GUC needs to move its utilities because the state transportation department plans to rebuild 10th Street so it becomes a direct route from the downtown area to the medical district located along Memorial Drive and Stantonsburg Road. Traveling from downtown to the medical district now requires drivers to make turns on multiple roads.

Utilities lines at 10th Street and Dickinson Avenue will have to be raised to accommodate an overpass that will bypass railroad tracks that run through the area. Other lines also will be moved.

Contracts for moving water, wastewater and gas lines will be brought before the utilities board in the coming months, Randy Emory, GUC’s director of water resources, said.

The Greenville City Council now has to approve the plan.

Jones said the goal is to finalize the contract with the transportation department in February so the utilities work can be completed by the time road construction begins in December 2014.

The utilities board also approved an $88,600 contract with Hazen & Sawyer engineers to being engineering work to upgrade GUC’s Water Treatment Sedimentation Basin.

The basin is where water is temporarily held so large particles can settle before the water is filtered for further treatment.

The system needs to be redesigned to slow the water flow so more particles can settle, Tony Cannon, GUC general manager and chief executive officer, said.

The total project is expected to cost $355,000.
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Old 12-30-2013, 05:57 PM
 
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Airport runway changes ready for takeoff

Pitt-Greenville Airport Authority members on Wednesday pushed the first shovels into the ground that ultimately will extend the airport’s runway.

Before the extension can proceed at the airport located on N.C. 11 north of Greenville, the existing utilities must be relocated to avoid future problems, P-GV manager Jerry Vickers told the staff, contractors and county officials who joined him for the brief ceremony at the relocation work site.

“It’s been about three years of environmental and neighborhood studies, home purchases and outreach work to this point,” Vickers said. “This is the first time we’ve actually moved dirt in the runway extension project.”

When completed, the $13 million project, paid by a combination of federal funds and several state grants, will be the largest improvement endeavor in the airport’s history, Vickers said.

It is all about airplane traffic safety, he said.

“We have to meet new Federal Aviation Administration requirements for 1,000 feet of spillover space at the end of the runway,” Vickers said.

That distance requirement cannot be met at the south end of runway number two because of encroachments into N.C. 11 (North Memorial Drive) and adjacent wetlands, Vickers said.

Although the project is not meant to increase airport operational capabilities, the extension project will accommodate future needs the airport will have for planes, Vickers said.

There were 16 properties identified within the project zone that could face noise disruption issues, he said.

The airport authority will purchase about half of those homes, and owners of the others in that area said they were not interested in selling, he said. An additional 26 properties lie in zones that present airspace issues, mainly from tall trees. Some of those homes will be bought and others will involve easements for the tree removals, Vickers said.

None of the changes will interfere with airport operations during the duration of the project, he said.

“We’ve worked with the FAA, our consultants, Talbert and Bright, and our primary contractor, T.A. Loving, to avoid any interruptions to our daily operations,” Vickers said.

Airport authority chairman Donald Taylor said the groundbreaking is the beginning of the end of the project.

“With this action, all our safety goals and obligations to the FAA will be met,” Taylor said.

Following the ceremony, Amy McLane, project manager for Talbert and Bright, reviewed work progress with representatives from construction and service providers, including Loving, GUC, Suddenlink and CenturyLink.

“We meet regularly to review our progress and make sure we’re covering safety and security issues,” McLane said. “Everything is going well. We’re on track, on budget and on time.”

Work on the actual runway extension is scheduled for May and will continue until its expected completion six months later, followed by easements to perform nearby tree removal, Vickers said. He projected about three more years until the entire project is completed.

P-GV’s revenues exceeded $300,000 in November, the first time that plateau had been reached, Vickers told board members at their monthly meeting following the groundbreaking ceremony.

Net profits for the month were $17,500, down from the $37,100 earned in November 2012, he said. Fuel expenses increased 56 percent over the same month a year ago, and maintenance expenses increased by 46 percent.

The airport pulled in a total of $1,357,000 during the past 12 months, showing a slight increase in profits over the previous 12-month period, Vickers said.

Last month’s announced airline merger that will see American Airlines taking over US Airways, P-GV’s principal service provider, will have no business effect on airport operations, Vickers said. US Air did add a sixth daily flight to its Sunday schedule, however, he said. There are five flights out of the airport on all other days.
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Old 12-30-2013, 06:42 PM
 
21 posts, read 24,901 times
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Originally Posted by ecusmitty View Post
Ok..addendum to my previous post..talked to someone else who said they spoke to a construction guy working there and he said it was being torn out and divided up into 3 smaller shops..so I really don't know!
The Old Circuit City is going to become a Sleepy's mattress store, Kirklands Home and a Petco store.
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Old 12-31-2013, 01:08 AM
 
1,674 posts, read 2,044,487 times
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Originally Posted by Gvillejb View Post
The Old Circuit City is going to become a Sleepy's mattress store, Kirklands Home and a Petco store.
Portfolio

Yep...and it only took five years to fill this space!
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Old 12-31-2013, 05:45 AM
 
Location: Greenville, NC
2,078 posts, read 5,047,749 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil A. Delphia View Post
Portfolio

Yep...and it only took five years to fill this space!
The economy was and remains rough. That they've been able to fill all of the empty large square footage buildings except for The Home Depot says a lot. One needs only to go to Kinston and see the sad shape of their mall to see what a down economy looks like.
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