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Old 02-14-2014, 07:38 AM
 
Location: Winterville
181 posts, read 214,954 times
Reputation: 61

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Quote:
Originally Posted by piratesrock View Post
Now this is just a thought I had when I saw that picture. Why isn't Greenville's boardwalk more boat/fishing friendly? Yes there is a boat ramp down there but I think there should be a place to dock your boat as well. Washington has a whole dock downtown and it's really a great feature to their city. People can just park their boats up there and go eat and hang out in town. I know Washington has a much wider river to work with but there are still many boats going up and down the Tar and I would think the city would encourage more recreation such as boating. The boardwalk just seems like it's a path beside the river that you can only look at the river. You aren't able to access the water easily. I would assume that you can't fish from the edge right? Anyone else got any thoughts on this?

I think it would be nice to see some shops and restaurants built closer to the river on the Town Commons to help connect the city with the river. I think the best use of the river is to bridge the gap between the city and the river cause right now the Commons seems like such a barrier that separates you from the river.

I'm not saying I want Greenville to be like Washington, I just think that they could get some ideas from their use of the riverfront. I've been down there many times and it's a really fun place to go eat and walk around downtown.
I totally agree with that. Any way we can encourage more downtown visitors would be helpful. Maybe having it lit up at night too would encourage more safe and high dollar traffic there. Instead of the bar crowd, it would be older more "well to do" types looking for a nice evening at a local restaurant. Although we could use more of those down town too.
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Old 02-14-2014, 07:41 AM
 
3,323 posts, read 5,185,093 times
Reputation: 2359
Quote:
Originally Posted by piratesrock View Post
Now this is just a thought I had when I saw that picture. Why isn't Greenville's boardwalk more boat/fishing friendly? Yes there is a boat ramp down there but I think there should be a place to dock your boat as well. Washington has a whole dock downtown and it's really a great feature to their city. People can just park their boats up there and go eat and hang out in town. I know Washington has a much wider river to work with but there are still many boats going up and down the Tar and I would think the city would encourage more recreation such as boating. The boardwalk just seems like it's a path beside the river that you can only look at the river. You aren't able to access the water easily. I would assume that you can't fish from the edge right? Anyone else got any thoughts on this?

I think it would be nice to see some shops and restaurants built closer to the river on the Town Commons to help connect the city with the river. I think the best use of the river is to bridge the gap between the city and the river cause right now the Commons seems like such a barrier that separates you from the river.

I'm not saying I want Greenville to be like Washington, I just think that they could get some ideas from their use of the riverfront. I've been down there many times and it's a really fun place to go eat and walk around downtown.
City Council has been talking about this for a while.

See: Tar River Legacy Plan | Greenville, North Carolina

and

City of Greenville, NC
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Old 02-14-2014, 07:43 AM
 
3,323 posts, read 5,185,093 times
Reputation: 2359
I posted about the progress, now WITN is reporting:

ECU's Heart Institute Unveils New Space For Robotics And Research

A new research and training opportunity has opened up for robotic cardiac surgery. WITN took a first-hand look at the facility and its equipment.

The 37,000 sq. ft. fourth floor of the East Carolina Heart Institute officially opened Thursday afternoon.

It will house advanced labs and simulated clinical rooms, with 80 to 120 people working in the area.

The only Robotic Cardiac Surgery training facility in the world sits on the floor as well.

The fourth floor will also house the East Carolina Diabetes and Obesity Institute.

WITN spoke with Dr. Wiley Nifong about the progress ECU has made in medicine.

Dr. Nifong said, "When they come here they're like, 'Oh we didn't realize this was all going on at East Carolina.' And not only here, but when you walk over to the Dental School and Allied Health School. This area now, the vision is, it's like a medical campus."

Dr. Nifong says when you look outside, you see white coats and blue coats, with everyone collaborating together. He says it's a lot more fun to work in that type of environment.

ECU's Heart Institute Unveils New Space For Robotics And Research
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Old 02-14-2014, 12:03 PM
 
Location: Greenville, NC
839 posts, read 1,039,573 times
Reputation: 176
that photo of uptown confirms the shear amount of space wasted by parking lots. If things keep progressing in a proactive manner & ECU develops their lots down there into Residence Halls, Uptown can look completely different in the next 10-15 years.
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Old 02-14-2014, 12:44 PM
 
2,401 posts, read 3,359,858 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jpirate View Post
that photo of uptown confirms the shear amount of space wasted by parking lots. If things keep progressing in a proactive manner & ECU develops their lots down there into Residence Halls, Uptown can look completely different in the next 10-15 years.
Yep...downtown Greenville is VERY underdeveloped. The parking deck at 4th and Cotanche will help as will the Georgetowne Commons complex.

But there is a ton of underdeveloped lots...not just ECU's parking lots. Downtown Greenville is relatively small and needs more teardown developments like Georgetown. Mixed Use should be everywhere.

Evans St also jumped out to me in that photo...that corridor needs a plan. I think Greenville backed off their plan for streetscaping Evans from 10th to Reade because of Georgetowne, but I hope they come back to it.
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Old 02-16-2014, 03:46 PM
 
Location: Greenville, NC
2,078 posts, read 5,042,551 times
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Here's a little something to think about. The total number of residents within Greenville's zip codes as of the 2010 census was now 108,695. Winterville totaled 23,407. I think it would be safe to assume that the Greenville metro area had 132,102 residents at that time. I did not include Ayden since it really is not connected to Winterville and a trip to Ayden quickly bears out the fact that Greenville's relative economic prosperity has had little effect on Ayden.
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Old 02-17-2014, 09:36 AM
 
1,020 posts, read 1,003,643 times
Reputation: 367
story from WITN about the 1st Street road improvements

Quote:
Some of the much anticipated improvements to First Street will be finished on Monday, February 17.

City of Greenville crews plan to remove the "No Parking" signs and open up parking on the North side of the street.

Crews recently finished repaving the street - with several changes to the traffic flow. The four lanes of traffic between Pitt and Summitt Streets have been reduced to two to allow for more on-street parking along the Town Common. Bicycle lanes are currently marked and will be properly striped once the weather cooperates enough.

Construction has taken several months to complete as City workers re-worked the sidewalks to allow for handicapped access, Greenville Utilities completed some underground utilities upgrades, and road crews repaved the stretch of road.

The changes are part of an overall effort to make the Town Common more accessible and the area around it more attractive to economic development.
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Old 02-17-2014, 05:27 PM
 
3,323 posts, read 5,185,093 times
Reputation: 2359
Quote:
Originally Posted by HP91 View Post
Yep...downtown Greenville is VERY underdeveloped. The parking deck at 4th and Cotanche will help as will the Georgetowne Commons complex.

But there is a ton of underdeveloped lots...not just ECU's parking lots. Downtown Greenville is relatively small and needs more teardown developments like Georgetown. Mixed Use should be everywhere.

Evans St also jumped out to me in that photo...that corridor needs a plan. I think Greenville backed off their plan for streetscaping Evans from 10th to Reade because of Georgetowne, but I hope they come back to it.
I think we are HOPEFULLY getting to the point where building UP (parking decks or mixed-use) is more economical than building out.

Everything east of Reade is ECU property, so its a separate issue.

My personal opinion is the block north of the Fire Station will be the next major redevelopment. Removing Pugh's and the dirt parking there. But what would do well with fire trucks leaving all day/night?

Development of the BB&T property right at Cotanche/Reade is key. Another anchor building to compliment Georgetown Commons.

It would REALLY be something if they could redevelop whole blocks. Like First/Washington/Evans or Second/Washington/Third/Greene. Temporarily move the businesses/government offices elsewhere and build a SINGLE building, with parking, landscape, and the works. It would look much better than the random buildings side by side we have now, and it would be more efficient.
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Old 02-17-2014, 08:27 PM
 
2,401 posts, read 3,359,858 times
Reputation: 1406
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrBojangles View Post
I think we are HOPEFULLY getting to the point where building UP (parking decks or mixed-use) is more economical than building out.

Everything east of Reade is ECU property, so its a separate issue.

My personal opinion is the block north of the Fire Station will be the next major redevelopment. Removing Pugh's and the dirt parking there. But what would do well with fire trucks leaving all day/night?

Development of the BB&T property right at Cotanche/Reade is key. Another anchor building to compliment Georgetown Commons.

It would REALLY be something if they could redevelop whole blocks. Like First/Washington/Evans or Second/Washington/Third/Greene. Temporarily move the businesses/government offices elsewhere and build a SINGLE building, with parking, landscape, and the works. It would look much better than the random buildings side by side we have now, and it would be more efficient.
That's exactly what I mean...but you need big developers to do it. I personally think hotels and condo's would work downtown especially across from the Town Common....there is what 5-6 whole blocks that could be redeveloped if you include the SECU block. If you put people at the Town Common, they will use the downtown businesses and it will continue to expand. For that reason I am NOT in favor of developing on the Common...keep the green space, build up where its underdeveloped.
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Old 02-17-2014, 09:37 PM
 
145 posts, read 221,910 times
Reputation: 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by HP91 View Post
That's exactly what I mean...but you need big developers to do it. I personally think hotels and condo's would work downtown especially across from the Town Common....there is what 5-6 whole blocks that could be redeveloped if you include the SECU block. If you put people at the Town Common, they will use the downtown businesses and it will continue to expand. For that reason I am NOT in favor of developing on the Common...keep the green space, build up where its underdeveloped.
I think there can be a balance between building on the underdeveloped areas but also developing on part of the Commons. It is too big of space that isn't being used to it's best potential. That property should be prime real estate downtown for restaurants, condos, a hotel, etc. because of the river but right now there is too much space between the road and the river. There shouldn't be buildings all along the front of the commons but just enough to draw people towards the river. It's all about drawing people to the Commons and then it will become a really nice element of Uptown. I think First Street becoming a two lane will help bridge the gap a little bit but there is just too much green space. I love having park space but if you really want a lot of green space then just go to River Park North.

I could see that area having restaurants, coffee shops, etc. with live music and stores with a pedestrian plaza on the river side where they could host weekend markets and rent out booth space for people to sell different handmade items but then there is still a large portion of green space left. That's my vision for that area.
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