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Old 06-22-2015, 07:02 PM
 
Location: Greenville
153 posts, read 186,734 times
Reputation: 87

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There is absolutely nothing about 60's commercial architecture that is good to look at. They're merely failed exercises for someone who tried too hard to make a statement. The Leo Jenkins Fine Arts building is a hideous blight on the ECU landscape. The VMC white building is the same. I'm all for varying architecture but Greenville has no identity. We're a revolutionary war era city that has almost nothing to show for that. You don't build Arizona style stuff in Greenville. There are tons of different architecture that span years that fit Greenville without dabbling in weird avant guard stuff. But that's just my opinion.

One great thing to do is save the old brick warehouses and tobacco warehouses downtown, restore them and turn them into housing or commercial property. At least they're trying to do some of that. I live in a neighborhood here in Greenville that unfortunately has a number of houses from the 60's and 70's that were this weird modern architecture. Just doesn't fit the neighborhodd.
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Old 06-23-2015, 06:50 AM
 
2,401 posts, read 3,359,858 times
Reputation: 1406
Agreed...I have mentioned for years that I would like to see the Art Building torn down and matching student housing put in its place. Its the perfect spot for that.

I would move the Fine Arts program into a renovated Ficklen Warehouse, which is right behind the Art Museum and create a small arts district. The space could be modified and be a nice free flow area, with some large classrooms. An outside Arts area could be created as well as some tie-ins with the Art Museum.
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Old 06-24-2015, 11:40 AM
 
Location: Greenville
82 posts, read 98,311 times
Reputation: 43
I would love to see a Mayfaire or North Hills Shopping Center-like complex go on the K-Mart Shopping Center site. Maybe with a hotel anchor for the stadiums as someone had mentioned. I think that may be a great way to get foot traffic down there and maybe over to the mall. Sadly, I feel like it might turn out like the shopping center on S Memorial.
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Old 06-24-2015, 02:40 PM
 
39 posts, read 59,767 times
Reputation: 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by jrecufan View Post
There is absolutely nothing about 60's commercial architecture that is good to look at. They're merely failed exercises for someone who tried too hard to make a statement. The Leo Jenkins Fine Arts building is a hideous blight on the ECU landscape. The VMC white building is the same. I'm all for varying architecture but Greenville has no identity. We're a revolutionary war era city that has almost nothing to show for that. You don't build Arizona style stuff in Greenville. There are tons of different architecture that span years that fit Greenville without dabbling in weird avant guard stuff. But that's just my opinion.
So you want Greenville to look like New England with a bunch of early style colonials? That's pretty much what most of Lynndale and Tucker look like anyway...

Quote:
Originally Posted by jrecufan View Post
I live in a neighborhood here in Greenville that unfortunately has a number of houses from the 60's and 70's that were this weird modern architecture. Just doesn't fit the neighborhodd.
...but those neighborhoods were built in the 60s and 70s, so how do the styles not fit the neighborhood? If anything they are exactly what belong there in order to preserve and praise the history of the development of Greenville and honor what it has become today.

I grew up in a neighborhood that was much like the one you seem to be describing. In the pre-recession boom, many people bought up these houses, tore them down, and built mcmansions in the style of the houses you seem to be advocating (revolutionary war era/colonial). And now the neighborhood doesn't have half the character it used to. When I return there it doesn't feel like "home". It feels like someone came in and built their idea of what that neighborhood should've been in the first place.

Leave well enough alone. Many of those 'avant garde' houses were built in an era when builders still took pride in the homes they built and built them to last. Simple facade treatments and interior renovations often make these homes works of modern art that are lovely to live in and around.
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Old 06-24-2015, 02:42 PM
 
39 posts, read 59,767 times
Reputation: 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by jrecufan View Post
There is absolutely nothing about 60's commercial architecture that is good to look at. They're merely failed exercises for someone who tried too hard to make a statement. The Leo Jenkins Fine Arts building is a hideous blight on the ECU landscape. The VMC white building is the same. I'm all for varying architecture but Greenville has no identity. We're a revolutionary war era city that has almost nothing to show for that. You don't build Arizona style stuff in Greenville. There are tons of different architecture that span years that fit Greenville without dabbling in weird avant guard stuff. But that's just my opinion.

One great thing to do is save the old brick warehouses and tobacco warehouses downtown, restore them and turn them into housing or commercial property. At least they're trying to do some of that. I live in a neighborhood here in Greenville that unfortunately has a number of houses from the 60's and 70's that were this weird modern architecture. Just doesn't fit the neighborhodd.
I don't disagree with this statement, however; especially given its prominent location on campus.
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Old 06-25-2015, 07:20 AM
 
105 posts, read 181,615 times
Reputation: 130
Quote:
Originally Posted by ThatGuyInNC View Post
So you want Greenville to look like New England with a bunch of early style colonials? That's pretty much what most of Lynndale and Tucker look like anyway...



...but those neighborhoods were built in the 60s and 70s, so how do the styles not fit the neighborhood? If anything they are exactly what belong there in order to preserve and praise the history of the development of Greenville and honor what it has become today.

I grew up in a neighborhood that was much like the one you seem to be describing. In the pre-recession boom, many people bought up these houses, tore them down, and built mcmansions in the style of the houses you seem to be advocating (revolutionary war era/colonial). And now the neighborhood doesn't have half the character it used to. When I return there it doesn't feel like "home". It feels like someone came in and built their idea of what that neighborhood should've been in the first place.

Leave well enough alone. Many of those 'avant garde' houses were built in an era when builders still took pride in the homes they built and built them to last. Simple facade treatments and interior renovations often make these homes works of modern art that are lovely to live in and around.


I have to agree ThatGuyInNC. I really don't mind 60's and 70's architecture or especially that era neighborhood. I certainly prefer it to many of the new neighborhoods today that are built-out by a single developer who insists on conformity. 60's-70's neighborhoods(architecture, homes), may not be attractive to everyone but at least its unique and worth looking at. It also stirs conversation. just look at these homes... https://www.flickr.com/groups/arapahoeacres/

I love neighborhoods where the houses are different throughout...Much of the new way of building just isn't my cup of tea. They look too much alike, as if they just came off of a conveyor belt, the garages are also too often fronted and the focal point of the homes... Just my $0.02.
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Old 06-26-2015, 07:08 AM
 
3,323 posts, read 5,185,093 times
Reputation: 2359
Info on Campus Edge apartments
  • Five-story mixed-use student housing
  • Should cost around $54 million
  • 275 apartments with 675 bedrooms
  • 20,000 square feet of retail space, a 700-car parking deck, courtyards, a resort-style pool, a fitness center, a rooftop terrace and an outdoor amenity center
  • Located beside Krispy Kreme at the corner of 10th Street and Charles Street.
  • Demolition in that area is expected to begin near the end of the year, once all construction surrounding The Boundary is complete.
  • The complex is expected to open in August 2017

I am guessing it will look similar to this:

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Old 06-26-2015, 08:37 AM
 
Location: Greenville
82 posts, read 98,311 times
Reputation: 43
So, is Krispy Kreme going to be the only thing left standing?
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Old 06-26-2015, 08:38 AM
 
293 posts, read 270,854 times
Reputation: 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by vitrinite View Post
I would love to see a Mayfaire or North Hills Shopping Center-like complex go on the K-Mart Shopping Center site. Maybe with a hotel anchor for the stadiums as someone had mentioned. I think that may be a great way to get foot traffic down there and maybe over to the mall. Sadly, I feel like it might turn out like the shopping center on S Memorial.
If they are smart about it they'll take into account the millennial campus that has been designated directly behind the shopping center. Open the configuration of the shopping center so that as that area of campus is developed by the university and partnering private business there is access to the shopping center and promotes cohesion for the whole area.

Related, I wonder if it would be worth considering, to removed the entrances/intersection/stop lights to the mall and the Kmart center from Greenville Blvd. The could open up some parking for the mall and route some traffic away from that congested section. Not mention remove a stop light from an already over accessed Gville Blvd. You could build a nice looking foot bridge over the street from one development to the other....
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Old 06-26-2015, 09:10 AM
 
2,401 posts, read 3,359,858 times
Reputation: 1406
Quote:
Originally Posted by vitrinite View Post
So, is Krispy Kreme going to be the only thing left standing?
Yeah, really...why wouldn't KK just go into one of the retail spots...

Sounds like that view (in the pic) would be more from the old Wendy's location rather than from McDonalds.

BTW, I was through downtown Greenville yesterday and looked at the varying styles...there sure is A LOT of brick....different colors, styles, etc...and Greenville has added the brick walkways on the street, brick on its parking deck, and even the archway pergolas into the Town Common are brick. ECU is getting ready to update the dark brick dorms with lighter brick. I think the Library is one of the best examples of using brick downtown and the columns added match the columns on the front of the original house.

The City buildings are the ones that are different, trying to match the Art Deco style of the old City Hall building and using a whiter color. I think with its proximity to the City Buildings and the obvious intent on using glass that matching the colors of the glass and white on the city buildings would help coordinate that theme. The style they picked for the Transit center is completely foreign to downtown Greenville, which actually has about 20 different styles of brick...and then the City stuff. Maybe that's by design. Would be nice to hear the architect's take on that.
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