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Old 04-28-2016, 11:23 AM
 
294 posts, read 272,121 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jpirate View Post
I'd agree with this as well. I'm not against a ballpark in the future, but the list of things I'd like to see done before a ballpark are long.
It depends, does the city want a minor league team or is it ok with a CPL or other college summer league? If the answer is a minor league team then you're racing against Kinston. The MiLB has radius/proximity clauses to protect organizations. If Kinston has a team I dont think Greenville could.
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Old 04-28-2016, 01:48 PM
 
1,022 posts, read 1,006,674 times
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Great points and discussion everyone.

I agree that there are several key items that we think the city needs, many which have been touched on. I think the parks system does need upgrading, but plans are in place for that. I live in Raleigh now, and enjoy using their greenway system. Greenville could have a nice system and it would be nice to connect it to places like Winterville, Farmville, and Ayden.

Before the last couple of years, ECU rarely hosted any events in Minges outside of ECU related events. That has changed for the better the last few years, and will probably continue to grow. It may work in the short term, but Greenville will eventually have to start having some things of their own.

There may be horror stories for some cities trying to lure a minor league team, but I look at cities in our own state like Greensboro, Durham, and Charlotte that moving the ballpark boosted growth in those areas. As far as expense, baseball is about as value packed as it gets, especially in a minor league setting. Most of the minor league & CPL teams i've seen range anywhere from $5-8 a person. It's cheaper than taking a family to a movie (one of the only kid friendly things to do in Greenville. ). There are only so many times you can take your kid to go see Shrek 6 or go bowling. Greenville doesn't even have any sort of "movies in the park" series going on. Options are limited.

I am not suggesting the city tries to make citizens pay for some 30 million dollar 8,000 seat behemoth stadium. But I don't see why a public/private 1,000-1,500 seat stadium that would easily be added to if demand is there should be out of the question. And who knows about the "greedy minor league owners"? A large part of minor league teams stay where they are for decades.

There's a long list of things that would boost growth in Greenville, and I see an opportunity to get an item checked off. It may not be the most immediate need on the board, but the opportunity could be there to get it checked off before it becomes more difficult to do so later. And if Greenville can do it and get a potential outdoor music venue out of the stadium, that crosses off two items.
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Old 04-28-2016, 05:48 PM
 
3,323 posts, read 5,193,368 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FrancisDrake View Post
It depends, does the city want a minor league team or is it ok with a CPL or other college summer league? If the answer is a minor league team then you're racing against Kinston. The MiLB has radius/proximity clauses to protect organizations. If Kinston has a team I dont think Greenville could.
I think the protected radius is 35 miles. Durham Bulls is right at 37 miles from the Mudcats.

A 35 mile radius around Kinston reaches just north of Jacksonville, Warsaw, Princeton, Wilson, Stokes, & Washington.

So it's either us or them.
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Old 04-28-2016, 05:58 PM
 
137 posts, read 141,127 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by michealbond View Post
Great points and discussion everyone.

There may be horror stories for some cities trying to lure a minor league team, but I look at cities in our own state like Greensboro, Durham, and Charlotte that moving the ballpark boosted growth in those areas.
I can't speak for Greensboro, but I've lived in both Charlotte and Durham and the new baseball parks in each city had very little if anything to do with growth of the downtown (uptown as Charlotte likes to call it) areas. DBAP in Durham has been in its present location since 1995. Downtown Durham Inc. was established in the early 1990's and helped establish Durham's Central Park and along with the redevelopment of the American Tobacco Campus around 2005 were the main catalysts for the redevelopment of downtown Durham.

The Charlotte Knights stadium just opened 2-3 years ago and the redevelopment of uptown took off in about the mid 1990's. The ballpark is a nice addition to uptown Charlotte, but it really had very little to do with getting redevelopment going.

Asheville and Charlotte were the first two downtowns that experienced redevelopment in NC. Raleigh's redevelopment started a little later. Generally, downtown redevelopment seems to have occurred earlier in larger cities (Asheville being the exception, but being a huge tourist and arts/crafts, music town helped them) and seems to be filtering down to smaller cities and towns. Greenville needs to capitalize on ECU's large and comprehensive College of Fine Arts to be a catalyst for downtown redevelopment. However, redevelopment requires a variety of catalysts working together. The organization, Uptown Greenville, and the city are the hub of that effort.

Greenville will get there, but not as fast as the larger and more financially able cities.
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Old 04-28-2016, 06:03 PM
 
1,674 posts, read 2,045,023 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MrBojangles View Post
I think the protected radius is 35 miles. Durham Bulls is right at 37 miles from the Mudcats.

A 35 mile radius around Kinston reaches just north of Jacksonville, Warsaw, Princeton, Wilson, Stokes, & Washington.

So it's either us or them.
There are teams in Winston-Salem and Burlington, both of which are less than thirty miles from the team in Greensboro.
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Old 04-28-2016, 06:12 PM
 
Location: Greenville, NC
1,070 posts, read 988,189 times
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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coasta..._%28Class_D%29

There was once the Greenville Greenies and the Greenville Robins? Did they play in Guy Smith?
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Old 04-29-2016, 07:53 AM
 
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Great to see things like this promoted. Eastern NC Film Festival happens this weekend at PCC.

Quote:
For about the cost of a matinee ticket at a local theater, movie lovers can choose from among more than 75 titles at Saturday's Eastern North Carolina Film Festival.

The third annual event, to be held at Pitt Community College, will feature 82 offerings, ranging from shorts to full-length features.

“In the past three years, we've had 1,001 films submitted to us,” festival director Ron Cooper said. “I'm blown away by it every single year.

“There will be comedies, there will be dramas, there will be horror, there will be suspense,” he said. “It's pretty much every genre that you could almost imagine.”

Some 360 films were submitted for this year's festival, some from as far away as Israel, Ukraine and Australia.

“I've recently gotten a film from Russia,” said Michael Stephenson, coordinator for PCC's music and drama associate in fine arts program. “It's very far reaching.

“I think it's a unique event for the community,” he said. “I can't think of anything else in the Greenville community where you can go and experience as many different kinds of cultures within one location.”

While about one-fourth of the films are international submissions — most with English subtitles — many of the featured titles are from filmmakers much closer to home.

East Carolina University graduate Evan Kidd, whose documentary on homelessness, “Displacement Welcomed,” was shown at last year's festival, returns with “Son of Clowns.” The 95-minute film, shot in Greenville and in the Triangle, follows the story of a fictional, out-of-luck actor forced to move back home with his parents, who are clowns operating a backyard circus. Several of Kidd's fellow ECU alumni are members of the film's cast and crew.

ECU graduate Jonathan Rorech will also screen a short film, “The Door,” at this year's festival. Shot in Greenville, the film runs eight minutes.

“Where We're Meant To Be,” by North Carolina Director Michael Howard, will be shown Saturday morning. The feature-length film is a collection of eight interwoven stories about people experiencing pivotal moments in their lives.

Among other films with North Carolina ties are “The Hollerin' Contest at Spivey's Corner” by Brian Gersten and “Unverified: The Untold Story Behind the UNC Scandal” by Bradley Bethel.

Raleigh filmmaker Rob Underhill will screen two films at the festival, the short “This Was My Son,” in which Mamie Till tells the world what a culture of racial hatred had done to her only son, Emmett Till, and “No Child,” a story about the power relationships have to change people. The 43-minute film stars Timmy Richardson of NBC’s “Little Big Shots.”

The actor, who had a recurring role on Tyler Perry’s “If Loving You Is Wrong,” will be among participants in a morning panel discussion on acting.

“In my opinion, some of the acting that you will see in some of these films could easily compete with any Oscar-winning actor you've ever seen,” Cooper said.

The festival, held in partnership with Eno River Media Productions, will present awards for best actor and actress, best supporting actor and actress as well as a judge's choice award. Saturday's audience will have a chance to help select the viewer's choice award, and online voting (at encff.com through midnight tonight) will determine the winner of the distance award, given to the filmmaker who has built an online presence and audience for his work. The Roselyn Armstrong Behind the Scenes Award, named for the late wife of Lee Armstrong, a PCC theater instructor, will be presented to a person who works in the background to promote the film industry in North Carolina.

A fundraiser for PCC's Drama Club, the festival is also designed to benefit the local arts community.

“The reason that we started it here was that, in other parts of the state, there are thriving arts communities and film communities,” Cooper, an actor, said. “I've always seen that there's a challenge of that in eastern North Carolina. We're trying to do what we can to bring more of a film community here.”

The festival is free to PCC students, faculty and staff. General admission is $8 in advance and $10 at the door to attend a morning film block from 9-11:30 a.m. or an afternoon session from 1:30-4 p.m. A panel discussion featuring actors will be held from 11:45 a.m.-12:30 p.m., and a panel discussion featuring filmmakers will be held from 4:15-5 p.m. A VIP ticket is $28 and includes all-day movies, a red carpet event at 7 p.m., an awards show at 8 p.m. and an after-party from 9-11 p.m. Visit encff.com or contact Michael Stephenson at rstephenson@email.pittcc.edu or 493-7493.
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Old 04-29-2016, 08:04 AM
 
294 posts, read 272,121 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil A. Delphia View Post
There are teams in Winston-Salem and Burlington, both of which are less than thirty miles from the team in Greensboro.
I've mined through MiLB rules before and found the exact mileage stipulation, but I believe existing teams can give permission for exceptions to this rule which may explain the teams you've mentioned. It could also be a grandfathered in type deal. Either way though, if Kinston has a team, they're not granting Greenville permission. Greenville and Pitt County have the population that would support Kinston's team.
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Old 04-29-2016, 08:06 AM
 
294 posts, read 272,121 times
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What is the story with the river front and its ability to be developed. I know the North side of the river is a no go bc of flooding, but what about areas to the east and west of town common? Could these areas be developed/rezoned to create more river front industry?
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Old 04-29-2016, 08:19 AM
 
Location: Greenville, NC
1,070 posts, read 988,189 times
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East of town common flooded in 1999. The greenway is now where there used to be a street.
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