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Old 10-21-2016, 03:09 AM
 
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GTAC contract approved, working starting before the end of the year.

Paving on Arlington and Red Banks to be finished by the end of the year.

A new Student Housing Complex to replace College View on 10th St?

'Long time coming': GTAC construction to begin soon - Daily Reflector
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Old 10-24-2016, 06:39 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HP91 View Post
GTAC contract approved, working starting before the end of the year.

Paving on Arlington and Red Banks to be finished by the end of the year.

A new Student Housing Complex to replace College View on 10th St?

'Long time coming': GTAC construction to begin soon - Daily Reflector
I wonder if it is the entire College View complex or just a portion of it? Villa Verde has carved out a niche there, with the proximity to the university perhaps this could be a small pocket of successful redevelopment.
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Old 10-24-2016, 06:42 AM
 
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Information about the flooding at PGV.

Quote:
Pitt-Greenville Airport’s new executive director said Hurricane Matthew changed the question about flooding from the Tar River from “will” to “when.”

“We know the Tar River will flood,” said Betty Stansbury, who has been on the job since June 1 after relocating from Indiana. “We can’t move the river, and we can’t move the airport ... so we have to minimize the risk associated with being next to a river that floods.”

The Pitt-Greenville Airport is back to normal operations after Hurricane Matthew and the resulting floods hit eastern North Carolina. The airport shut down operations on Oct. 9 and reopened its shorter runway to smaller planes on Wednesday. The facility resumed commercial airline flights on Friday, Stansbury said.

The south end of the airport’s main runway was covered by floodwaters for several days, and water flooded the parking lot and damaged some vehicles that had been left at the facility.

“When we closed that Sunday, there were about 75 cars parked at the airport,” Stansbury said. “We contacted as many people as we could and opened the gates so people wouldn’t have to pay to get out. We were down to about 33 cars when the river reached its highest level. A few of them did get some water damage, but most were parked where it was a little more elevated.”
Water entered most of the facility’s 24 hangars but did not get inside the airport’s terminal, Stansbury said.
“The damage was not as bad as it could have been,” she said. “Our estimates for damage to the hangars is about $350,000 right now.”

An engineer from the airport’s consulting group assessed the structural integrity of the runways before the airport reopened.

“The engineers inspected the runway, and there was no visual damage,” Stansbury said. “And they performed a load-bearing test to ensure that planes could land on it. In a few weeks, we will do additional testing to make sure there is no damage to the foundation.”

Crews also spent several days cleaning debris from the runways before any planes could land.
“That absolutely had to be done because any debris is hazardous to aircraft,” Stansbury said. “It cost $33,000 to have that done.”

Now that operations have been restored, Stansbury said airport officials can discuss what can be done to prepare for a major flood event in the future.

“Our first priority has been getting the airport up and running,” Stansbury said. “Now we’re going to have some discussions here with the Federal Aviation Administration to see what we can do to limit the amount of damage the next time the Tar River floods.”

Stansbury said one of the airport’s top priorities should be elevating the south end of the facility’s main runway to keep it above potential floodwaters. Stansbury said the runway could be elevated if funding can be secured for the project.
“The north end of the runway is at an elevation of 26 feet,” she said. “The south end is at 20 feet. The north end of the runway did not flood. We need to look at leveling the runway off, which is just a matter of obtaining the funds needed.”
U.S. Rep. G.K. Butterfield, the District 1 representative from Wilson, said he will be seeking federal grant money for a potential runway elevation project.

“We have to keep that runway out of the water,” Butterfield, who recently helped the airport secure a $2.5 million grant to fund improvements and upgrades, said. “I am working on getting money from the FAA to do that.”
Stansbury said airport officials also may consider moving more of its operation into the second floor of the facility’s terminal. In 2011, the Pitt-Greenville Airport completed a $7.9 million expansion and renovation that added a second floor to the terminal where the passenger screening and holding areas are located.

“That renovation was done with Hurricane Floyd (in 1999) in mind,” Stansbury said. “After Hurricane Matthew, we had to move everything on the first floor up to the second floor in case the water entered the terminal. If the airport decides to do another expansion, we could consider moving operations to a second story to keep everything out of potential floodwaters.”
Keeping the airport’s hangars and parking lot away from flooding could prove more challenging, Stansbury said.

“You can’t elevate the hangars because you wouldn’t be able to get the planes into them,” she said. “I’m not sure what can be done for the hangars and the parking lot. I will have to discuss that with our engineers to determine what can realistically and reasonably be done.”


‘A valuable asset’

Some people have raised concerns about investing federal tax dollars into an airport damaged by two major flooding events in 17 years. Others have suggested consolidating air services with the airport in Kinston and developing that facility into a larger, regional airport.

“A lot of people will say move the airport to Kinston,” Stansbury said. “But we don’t want to go to Kinston and have everyone in Greenville have to go there for their air transportation needs.”

Stansbury said many areas west of Pitt County also rely on Pitt-Greenville Airport for air transportation services.
“We are the closest airport for these communities,” she said. “They need us here as well.”

Stansbury said the Pitt-Greenville Airport also plays an important role in Pitt County’s economy.
“The airport makes a significant economic contribution to this community,” she said.

During the June 6 meeting of the Greenville City Council, Pitt-Greenville Airport Authority Chairman John Banks presented the results of a study conducted by the state on the economic impact of airports on local economies. According to the study, airports contribute to an economy through:

* Direct impacts, which come from businesses that are directly engaged in the movement of people or goods through an airport, such as airline employees and rental car companies;

* Indirect impacts, which come from spending by airport-related businesses on products and services provided by support businesses, such as office supply companies or property maintenance;

* Induced impacts, which comes from payroll expenditures by employees of directly and indirectly related businesses that produce successive spending locally.

Banks said the Pitt-Greenville Airport has an estimated economic impact of about $100 million a year in Pitt County, according to the state’s study. That estimate has almost doubled since 2011, when the state’s data put the airport’s economic contribution at about $51 million each year.

“That is a big economic draw for this region,” Banks told council members during the June meeting.
Greenville Mayor Allen Thomas, also a board member of the Pitt-Greenville Airport Authority, said the airport is an important factor in the area’s economic growth.

“Transportation is an important part of our infrastructure,” Thomas said. “A lot of businesses here depend on having access to air transportation services, and having an airport is one of the top things businesses and industries look at when looking at an area to locate.

“This airport is an asset ... and we think it’s an important one,” Thomas said. “And we are going to continue to aggressively develop this asset in the coming years.”
It may be time to look at a more regional airport. It does seem odd that Greenville, New Bern, and Kinston all have airports. Maybe it's time they joined forces and provided the entire region with an airport . Of course, nobody will want to give up what they already have, even if there is a chance that they can all get more. To me, it would make sense to not continue divide up the pie of flyers and have them all use a single airport.
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Old 10-24-2016, 10:59 AM
 
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The issue is $. Kinston is the logical spot for it, but they don't generate any traffic for it. So a regional airport goes to Kinston while New Bern and Greenville lose the economic impact. If it is ever going to happin there would have to be some sort of revenue sharing contract in place for all three counties. I just don't know if it will ever happen. Maybe now with the transportation infrastructure improving between these three cities/counties the idea could be revisited...
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Old 10-24-2016, 01:28 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by michealbond View Post
Information about the flooding at PGV.



It may be time to look at a more regional airport. It does seem odd that Greenville, New Bern, and Kinston all have airports. Maybe it's time they joined forces and provided the entire region with an airport . Of course, nobody will want to give up what they already have, even if there is a chance that they can all get more. To me, it would make sense to not continue divide up the pie of flyers and have them all use a single airport.
The VOA site B, south of Black Jack, north of Vanceboro is a perfect spot to put a regional airport that would not cost any money. Feds could just deed it over to a Regional Airport Authority.

The issue is roads. You have to have access. If 43 was widened, and 17 was widened with a bypass connection to 43, then you just need some access roads off of each. Plans should be in place for these roads anyway. Gives 20 minute access from Washington, Greenville and New Bern (via the future 17 bypass). And probably 30 minute access from Kinston. Greenville is also continuing to grow to its south and will eventually have a southern bypass...essentially the largest metro growing toward this location.
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Old 10-25-2016, 06:56 AM
 
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Speaking of the airport, they are creating a commerce/industrial park.

Quote:
Pitt-Greenville Airport is enlisting the help of city, county and ECU officials to create more jobs north of the Tar River in the coming decade.

Airport officials want to create a commercial/industrial development — the PGV Commerce/Technology Park — on 90 acres of property the airport authority purchased for $1.8 million in 2011. The development would generate revenue for the airport and provide services and jobs for people living in northern Pitt County, said Betty Stansbury, Pitt-Greenville Airport executive director.

"We are looking for partners to help us develop the property," Stansbury said. “We have talked with the city and county economic development people, officials with ECU and are looking to talk with Vidant as well ... we are looking at any unmet needs in the community that they be able to identify.”

The airport purchased the property along Belvoir Highway, or N.C. 33 West, east of Oak Grove subdivision to prevent development that would clash with the airport's flight patterns, such as housing, a school or church.
During the recent flooding from Hurricane Matthew, floodwaters did not reach the property that the airport wants to develop, Stansbury said.

“That property is at a higher elevation than the south end of the airport and is not in the 100-year flood plain,” she said. “That was something the board looked at ... we wouldn’t develop this land if it was in a flood-prone area.”
Greenville Mayor Allen Thomas, who also is a board member of the Pitt-Greenville Airport Authority, said the Tar River would have to flood at Hurricane Floyd levels or higher before it would affect any development on the site.

“It didn’t get any water from Hurricane Matthew and I think that is a good sign,” Thomas said. “And Hurricane Floyd is the type of flooding event that comes along once in a generation. I don’t think a development there is at any greater risk than in any of the nearby industrial parks.”


Thinking ahead


Since purchasing the property, officials have been discussing how the land could be used to generate revenue and stimulate commercial and perhaps light industrial growth.

Airports in cities such as Provo, Utah; Rockford, Ill.; San Bernardino, Calif.; and Brunswick, Ga., have secured money from the federal Economic Development Administration that has paid for infrastructure and roadway improvements and an industrial park.

Using these grants, the airport would be responsible for site development, installing the roads, curbing, water, sewer and other infrastructure, and prospective businesses would enter long-term leases and build their own structures.
Former Pitt-Greenville Airport executive director Jerry Vickers discussed the project with the Pitt County Board of Commissioners in early March and secured a letter of support from the board to the Mid-East Commission, which assists with the grant applications. Such a letter is a prerequisite for applying for federal grants. The airport’s board directed Stansbury to continue the project after Vickers’ retirement.

"The board wants to develop something that brings higher paying jobs north of the river,” Stansbury said. “The roads and utilities are already adjacent to the property and it is ready to be developed ... we just have to identify the right use.”
‘Change a community’

Before coming to Greenville, Stansbury was the director at Purdue University Airport in West Lafayette, Ind. The airport is only one of 13 university-owned airports in the United States and is the second-busiest airport in Indiana.
About 2 miles north of Purdue University's campus is the 725-acre Purdue Research Park, the largest university-affiliated research park in the United States with almost 200 companies in numerous industries including biology, materials science and information science.

Stansbury said because Pitt County is so heavily involved in health sciences through East Carolina University and Vidant Health, the PGV Commerce/Technology Park could develop something similar on a smaller scale.
“I’ve seen this business model ... and I’ve seen this business model be successful,” Stansbury said. “Part of what attracted me to Greenville was ECU and the potential that comes out of a university. A park like this very well could be where new startup companies can form through the new technologies coming out of ECU and Vidant. These start-up companies have the potential to change the world.

“I’ve seen these companies form and seen how the jobs they bring can change a community,” she said.
Stansbury said the site also is well-suited for light-industrial uses or for a company that wants to establish a corporate headquarters in the area.

“We are looking at clean industries, like companies that wash and package leafy greens,” Stansbury said. “Those types of industries require access to an abundance of fresh water, which we have there. However, other businesses, like a corporate headquarters, may require access to an airport for its executives. There are a lot of different options ... that’s why we are reaching out to see if there are any unmet needs in the community.”
‘It’s always good to have options’

Greenville’s Economic Development Manager Roger Johnson said the city will be working with the airport to help develop strategies for developing and marketing the PGV Commerce/Technology Park.
“During the City Council’s planning retreat in January, council members directed staff to look for ways to promote economic development north of the river,” Johnson said. “We saw a great opportunity to do that when Betty Stansbury reached out to us. I think that site shows a lot of potential.”

Johnson said that even though there already are several industrial parks in Greenville and Pitt County, the PGV Commerce/Technology Park would not be competing for companies looking to locate in the area.
“Part of the strategy is the recruiting of different types of businesses or industries,” Johnson said. “Different companies have different requirements and we can suggest sites that best suit their needs. These parks will complement one another instead of competing with one another.

“Even though the property may be outside Greenville city limits, any development there will benefit all of Pitt County,” he said. “Economic development has to be a team sport and a lot of the growth we are seeing is a result of the cooperation we have here.”

Wanda Yuhas, executive director of the Pitt County Development Commission, agreed.
“It’s always good to have options to give companies looking to locate in eastern North Carolina,” Yuhas said. “The more options we have, the better it is for everyone.”

Yuhas said the county also will be assisting the airport in marketing the complex to prospective businesses. Yuhas said that recent developments, like the efforts to obtain interstate designation for U.S. 264, the CSX railway terminal being constructed in Edgecombe County and the airport’s future expansion project, potentially will attract new industries to the region.

“Darwin said ‘it is not the strongest of the species or the most intelligent that survives ... it is the one that is most adaptable to change,’” Yuhas said. “We are showing how adaptable we are in this area. We are transitioning from being a really big town to being a genuine city and the groundwork is being laid to accommodate that growth.

“It’s a really exciting time,” she said.
I think it is a great idea.
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Old 10-26-2016, 09:30 AM
 
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Not directly Greenville related, but I thought the article was an interesting example of the potential a baseball/mixed use stadium could have.

National Club Baseball Association will hold Division I World Series at Holly Springs North Main Athletic Complex | News & Observer

Basically, Holly Springs built a mixed use stadium a couple of years ago, and they have a Coastal Plains league team. The city just announced that they will be hosting the National Club baseball championship in 2017 and 2018. They also are hosting the CPL all-star game. These two events are expected to bring in thousands of fans and millions of dollars into the city's economy.

I believe something similar could happen in Greenville. It's been rather slow lately, so I figure I would give us something to talk about other than highways !
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Old 10-26-2016, 09:36 AM
 
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Plywood was taken off one side of the building at Pitt St and Dickinson Ave. It looks like this will be the location of the other small brewery that was rumored as it has a NC brewery map on the window. It looks like a cool spot. Garage doors in the rear and front sides of the building. A comedy club is also going next door.
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Old 10-26-2016, 10:08 AM
 
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Originally Posted by michealbond View Post
Not directly Greenville related, but I thought the article was an interesting example of the potential a baseball/mixed use stadium could have.

National Club Baseball Association will hold Division I World Series at Holly Springs North Main Athletic Complex | News & Observer

Basically, Holly Springs built a mixed use stadium a couple of years ago, and they have a Coastal Plains league team. The city just announced that they will be hosting the National Club baseball championship in 2017 and 2018. They also are hosting the CPL all-star game. These two events are expected to bring in thousands of fans and millions of dollars into the city's economy.

I believe something similar could happen in Greenville. It's been rather slow lately, so I figure I would give us something to talk about other than highways !
I like Holly Springs' facility though for Greenville I am biased towards a park UpTown and I'm not sure the Holly Spring model fits Uptown anywhere....
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Old 10-26-2016, 11:19 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Beasty Drummer View Post
Plywood was taken off one side of the building at Pitt St and Dickinson Ave. It looks like this will be the location of the other small brewery that was rumored as it has a NC brewery map on the window. It looks like a cool spot. Garage doors in the rear and front sides of the building. A comedy club is also going next door.
That sounds cool! Anyone have pics of the building?



Quote:
Originally Posted by FrancisDrake View Post
I like Holly Springs' facility though for Greenville I am biased towards a park UpTown and I'm not sure the Holly Spring model fits Uptown anywhere....

The entire site with the soccer fields, tennis courts, etc. definitely wouldn't fit, but the stadium itself could probably be put somewhere uptown.


As a side note...if you go to Google Maps and search for Greenville, NC...switch to satellite view and you'll be able to view the construction of the 10th street connector. So much dirt has been moved, you can actually see the size and scope of the project. It's pretty cool!
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