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Old 12-03-2016, 09:46 AM
 
137 posts, read 140,793 times
Reputation: 76

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. ENC View Post
So they want to tear down all the homes and businesses in that area to make this happen. I'm all for gentrification but not at the expense this proposed development will do.
It's not actually a proposed development, just a proposed development plan. However, just as has happened in the revitalization of downtown and any other development, when this plan is put in place and this kind of development starts, the value of the land will rise and the current landowners can either participate in the development or sell their land to developers for much more than it is currently worth. Although, they may relocate, they should see significant gains in their present investment, which I would think most folks would not be opposed to.
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Old 12-04-2016, 10:57 AM
 
2,401 posts, read 3,357,134 times
Reputation: 1406
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. ENC View Post
So they want to tear down all the homes and businesses in that area to make this happen. I'm all for gentrification but not at the expense this proposed development will do.
Tearing down the houses on Memorial Drive is the right thing to do...residential with lack of appropriate buffer/setbacks is not the appropriate use of that property on that road.

Just look at the completed 10th St connector, the neighborhoods are now defined and will have buffering from traffic. Plus it LOOKS so much better for the community.
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Old 12-04-2016, 05:17 PM
 
181 posts, read 185,062 times
Reputation: 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. ENC View Post
So they want to tear down all the homes and businesses in that area to make this happen. I'm all for gentrification but not at the expense this proposed development will do.
I agree with this line of thinking if, and only if, there is a lack of similarly affordable living within a stone's throw. In this case, there is not. Greenville has more than enough low income-level housing in this vicinity to tend to the folks living in the apartment complexes here (which is the majority of what's to be redeveloped).

In the cases of the houses along Memorial, the reality is, there's got to come a time where you move on from having homes that aren't historic in value along high density streets. When it's a main thoroughfare for an area of ~100,000 people, you either make the choice to make it a residential-friendly road, or you move on from the houses and like HP91 said above, try to create a traffic buffer from residences.

It is impossible for Memorial to become anything less than what it is density-wise, so now it's time to start putting wise planning into place and improve the area.
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Old 12-05-2016, 05:31 AM
 
137 posts, read 140,793 times
Reputation: 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by GoingLocal View Post
It's not actually a proposed development, just a proposed development plan. However, just as has happened in the revitalization of downtown and any other development, when this plan is put in place and this kind of development starts, the value of the land will rise and the current landowners can either participate in the development or sell their land to developers for much more than it is currently worth. Although, they may relocate, they should see significant gains in their present investment, which I would think most folks would not be opposed to.
I know someone who has land on Guess Road, north of I-85, who's getting offers upwards of a million dollars and acre. That part of Guess Road is probably a step down from what the section of Memorial Drive could become. No, land values in Greenville are not as high as Durham, but still, once that area has been designated a special planning zone, the land in that zone will become much more valuable. I doubt, a residential parcel in that area now is that desirable due to the proximity to the road, road noise, and lack of amenities in that area. Building in open space and greenways into these new zones, as well as creating jobs, restaurants, shopping, and recreational opportunities make them much more attractive places to live, work, and play, thereby, increasing the real estate values.
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Old 12-05-2016, 06:48 AM
 
1,019 posts, read 1,002,816 times
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Parking issues top City Council agenda - Daily Reflector

Quote:
The Greenville City Council tonight will consider recommendations from a city task force charged with finding solutions to parking problems in the downtown area.

The council will meet at 6 p.m. on the third floor of City Hall, 200 W. Fifth St. The meetings will include a public comment period.

During an April 14 meeting, the council directed city staff with addressing concerns about parking in downtown Greenville that included lack of communication between the city and residents about changes; confusion with the pay stations throughout the downtown district; and questions about why the city charges for parking in some areas but allows up to two hours of free parking in others.

The issues were discouraging people from shopping, dining or attending events downtown, City Councilwoman Kandie Smith said.

“Parking is a hot topic,” Smith said. “We are talking about economic development and drawing people in. ... If we continue to have these kinds of issues, we are going to push people out.”

Smith added that confusion and lack of communication were causing some residents to be ticketed unfairly.
“We are penalizing people for parking when we ourselves are unclear on some of these things,” Smith said. “That does not make us look good as a city.”

City Manager Barbara Lipscomb said Greenville’s economic development manager, Roger Johnson, was selected to look at the parking issues. Before coming to Greenville, Johnson was the special assistant for development for the City of Wilmington and supervised Wilmington’s parking manager.

“Roger has experience with these types of issues,” Lipscomb said during the April meeting. “He has agreed to take on this role for the city.”

Johnson formed a parking task force to identify the concerns of business owners and residents. The group was composed of staff members of the Greenville Police Department, the Uptown Greenville organization, the city’s Office of Economic Development, Public Works, Planning and Code Enforcement departments.

Some of the parking issues in downtown Greenville identified by the task force included:

• A lack of available spaces in the downtown district and the elimination of on-street parking along parts of Fifth Street.

• A number of commuters complained that signs in the Fourth Street Parking Deck that indicate hours of operations and fees are unclear, and the facility’s pay station is located too far from the entrance.

• Some residents said paying at downtown parking kiosks is confusing, and a number of business owners said they are losing business because the system is not customer-friendly.

• The city, Pitt County, ECU and downtown businesses use different signage, and private-owned lots are not required to post any signs at all. Some residents said this makes it unclear about which parking is public and which is private.
The task force will present recommendations to the City Council for consideration tonight. Some of the recommendations include:

• Increasing the number of public parking spaces in the downtown district;

• Placing a security gate at the entrance and exit of the parking deck and removing the kiosk;

• Standardize signage in the downtown parking area so there is no misunderstanding on what is public and what is private. This would include replacing existing signs. All on-street parking spaces would be marked as well.
How in the world have they flubbed this up so badly? I really feel like it's a pretty simple process. I think a big chunk of the blame is that people complaining haven't had to pay for parking, and don't feel like they SHOULD have to pay to park anywhere. I also believe the city probably made it slightly harder than it should have been and people (who were already against paying) just couldn't handle it.
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Old 12-05-2016, 07:52 AM
 
2,401 posts, read 3,357,134 times
Reputation: 1406
Parking downtown is somewhat cultural, as MB noted. No one wants to pay and so they come up with other excuses.

Additionally, no one wants to walk. God forbid if you have to walk a few short blocks to get where you are going. That's a cultural thing to...as you watch some people drive through strip centers for 15 minutes trying to find a space close to your store.

I can say this...there are times when it is hard to find a parking space downtown, specifically when the 5th/Evans lot is being used for events. As development continues in the Dickinson Ave corridor, that lot becomes more and more valuable. A second parking deck in that area (how about the vacant lot on the corner of Reade/Dickinson next to the Bankruptcy courthouse) will be viable real soon. I would love to see that and the 5th/Evans lot turned into an actual green space.
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Old 12-05-2016, 08:21 AM
 
Location: Winterville
181 posts, read 214,687 times
Reputation: 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by HP91 View Post
Parking downtown is somewhat cultural, as MB noted. No one wants to pay and so they come up with other excuses.

Additionally, no one wants to walk. God forbid if you have to walk a few short blocks to get where you are going. That's a cultural thing to...as you watch some people drive through strip centers for 15 minutes trying to find a space close to your store.

I can say this...there are times when it is hard to find a parking space downtown, specifically when the 5th/Evans lot is being used for events. As development continues in the Dickinson Ave corridor, that lot becomes more and more valuable. A second parking deck in that area (how about the vacant lot on the corner of Reade/Dickinson next to the Bankruptcy courthouse) will be viable real soon. I would love to see that and the 5th/Evans lot turned into an actual green space.
I think you're right. Personally, I refuse to pay for parking in the parking deck because, as I understand it, I was already taxed to build it. However, I've never had an issue finding parking more than 1, MAYBE 2 blocks away on rare occasions. I'm not really sure if people in this area understand what it's like to actually have a real shortage of parking. But the inconsistencies are definitely confusing.
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Old 12-06-2016, 01:51 PM
 
1,672 posts, read 2,040,014 times
Reputation: 1074
Greenville residents' survey regarding the Imperial site:

https://unc.az1.qualtrics.com/jfe/fo...b4U37wbwxtBjSt
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Old 12-07-2016, 02:16 AM
 
2,401 posts, read 3,357,134 times
Reputation: 1406
10th St corridor improvements on Council Agenda Thursday night...

Developer requests closing part of South Pitt Street - Daily Reflector

"NCDOT officials said the safety improvements would be done in stages and could take up to two years before all of the recommended improvements could be implemented."

Study area was from Cotanche to Oxford Rd. IMO, these improvements are critical for ECU and Greenville and could help spur re-development along this important corridor. Kimley-Horn is working on design, same firm that designed the 10th St connector, which is supposed to be finished in 2019.

Also a portion of Pitt St will likely be closing during the construction on the old Pugh site.

Last edited by HP91; 12-07-2016 at 02:26 AM..
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Old 12-07-2016, 07:06 AM
 
293 posts, read 270,529 times
Reputation: 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by HP91 View Post
10th St corridor improvements on Council Agenda Thursday night...

Developer requests closing part of South Pitt Street - Daily Reflector

"NCDOT officials said the safety improvements would be done in stages and could take up to two years before all of the recommended improvements could be implemented."

Study area was from Cotanche to Oxford Rd. IMO, these improvements are critical for ECU and Greenville and could help spur re-development along this important corridor. Kimley-Horn is working on design, same firm that designed the 10th St connector, which is supposed to be finished in 2019.

Also a portion of Pitt St will likely be closing during the construction on the old Pugh site.
If they truly implement all of these improvements from Cotanche to Oxford that 10th street corridor will be amazing. With redevelopment of college view I have to believe it will seed additional redevelopment along the entire route from Gville Blvd to Brownlea.
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