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Old 11-30-2017, 08:50 PM
Status: "Greenville Works" (set 11 days ago)
 
3,291 posts, read 5,451,726 times
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Early next year, I am meeting with a prominent official at ECU to discuss the redevelopment of the “warehouse district”, which will be turned into ECU’s very own “Millennial Campus.” In accordance with what the official and I have discussed, we will be speaking on the concept of making this campus into a “smart neighborhood.” The question(s) for the community is:

1. What do you all think of the concept of a “smart neighborhood” where Millennial Campus currently is?
2. What advice, if any can be provided, in regards to improving the current design of Millennial Campus?

With many companies across the country currently building new smart cities, Greenville and ECU has the opportunity of a lifetime to show how smart city technologies can be implemented within an existing neighborhood. We must stop with the thinking of the past of trying to catch up (in regards to infrastructure development) with our North/South Carolina peers, and instead think forward. Our city, with the right vision, can truly be a national leader in regards to implementing future technologies — LETS MAKE IT HAPPEN!.

For information on the Millennial Campus click on the link below:

http://www.ecu.edu/cs-admin/news/millennialcampus.cfm
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Old 11-30-2017, 10:21 PM
 
1,677 posts, read 2,049,224 times
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Grifton once again has grocery store after Hurricane Matthew damage
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Old 12-01-2017, 05:15 AM
 
1,022 posts, read 1,009,636 times
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Parking consultant: Downtown needs fewer leased spaces, higher fines - Daily Reflector

Quote:
Fewer leased spaces, higher parking fines and the creation of a “parking champion” were among the recommendations of a consultant hired by the city to study downtown Greenville’s parking problems.

Michael Conner, a consultant with Walker Planning and Consulting, recommended these solutions during a public input and update meeting held at Sheppard Memorial Library on Thursday night. The firm was hired by the city in April, and has been studying the parking situation downtown ever since. Thursday night’s meeting was the second public input meeting, and the first reveal of the recommendations the firm will present to the City Council in December.

The recommendations presented by Conner were based on those input meetings, a poll conducted by the city in June, and a set of data collected by the firm in April. In addition, the firm consulted with city staff, East Carolina University and business owners to create a comprehensive looks at downtown parking challenges. Connor stressed at the beginning of the meeting that these recommendations and data sets were drafts, and input from Thursday night’s meeting — as well as meeting with the City’s Public Transportation and Parking Commission next week — would influence the final presentation to council.

According to the data presented, downtown Greenville has 4,701 parking spaces. Of these spaces, 2,100 are private and 2,601 are public spaces owned by the city and East Carolina University. ECU owns 1,307 and the city owns 1,294 — 637 of which are off-street, and 657 are on-street spaces. More than 95 percent of downtown workers, visitors, and students arrive by automobile.

According to the study, parking demand peaks at 2 p.m. when 65 percent of public spaces are filled. Connor said though this data suggest that almost 45 percent of parking in the area is available, it does not tell the whole story. He said the percentage includes the ECU lots — which only students and faculty with certain passes can use — and leased off-street city parking which might not be available to potential visitors to the area.

Of the 637 off-street parking spots in the area, 248 are leased, something Connor called “an unusually high volume” of promised spaces. Additionally, some spaces may not be convenient to visitors’ destinations. Areas in the Dickenson Avenue area and lots West of North Greene Street were between zero and 50 percent occupied during peak hours, but areas like those adjacent to Sup Dogs on Reade Street and the area south of Reade Circle near The Boundary student apartment complex saw 85-100 percent occupancy.

Connor said on top of the issue of supply in certain areas, the improper use of many of the city’s on-street spaces also leads to an increased strain on the parking infrastructure. According to the results of the study, 25 percent of all vehicles in 30 minute, 2 hour and metered on-street parking parked longer than two hours. Connor said this was hurting the local economy.

“Curbside parking is really the lifeblood for a lot for a lot of retail businesses; it’s that ‘stop and shop’ opportunity,” he said. “So like tables a restaurant, you want those spaces to turn over.”

The results of a June poll reveal the problem with parking downtown. Although less than 70 percent of on- and off-street parking is occupied at a given time, more than 30 percent of residents spend more than five minutes searching for a parking space, and about 45 percent of residents said they do not believe the supply of parking is adequate for their needs. About 40 percent of poll participants rated parking downtown either “bad” or “terrible”. More than 85 percent of participants said they walk two blocks or less from where they park to their destination.

Connor said the first recommendation is to limit the amount of leased spacing throughout the area. He said the goal should be quick, temporary parking designed to bring visitors in and out of downtown. Because of this, he suggested changing much of the leased parking to two-hour lots. Currently, there are 131 two-hour spaces, representing only 21 percent of city-owned parking.

Connor said that much of leased parking is for long-term parking needs — used by employees and residents of the area. He recommended moving this use to more peripheral lots in the downtown area, to free up more room for visitors. He said another option would be creating certain zones where residents can park between 5 p.m. and 9 a.m. giving residents the ability to park overnight, but freeing up spaces during hours when visitors are coming downtown.

He also recommended the complete elimination of ‘E’ passes, which are issued by the city allowing residents to park in two-hour spots indefinitely. He said there are about 50 of these issued and they place a considerable strain on the exact kind of parking designed for short-term use. He said Greenville was the first city he had encountered with such a system.
According to Connor, Greenville also has low fines for parking violations, and recommended raising them as needed to encourage compliance. Currently, the fine for overtime parking and meter violations are $5, illegal parking is $15 and ADA parking violations are $100. Connor said these low fines make it easier for wealthier students and visitors to risk parking in spaces then to purchase passes or find correct parking.

“It needs to be a little tougher, a warning and then a $5 fine is not going to change the behavior of a student that might have money, or a law firm coming to the court,” he said. “There’s not enough teeth.”

Finally, Connor said that Greenville not having a dedicated individual in charge of parking and parking related concerns is problematic. This designated parking “champion” is someone Connor said creates a long-term understanding and solutions for evolving parking needs. Other suggestions he recommended were the purchase a more sophisticated parking control features, like updates meters in parking decks or controlled entryways. He said purchasing better hardware like license plate scanners for parking enforcement staff would also help considerably.

Roger Johnson, the economic development manager for the city of Greenville, who is working closely with Connor was also in attendance Thursday night. He said that parking is an issue in Greenville, but one that he is glad to have.
“These are growing pains, and all signs of a healthy city,” he said. “When you don’t have people wanting to park downtown, that;s when you really have a problem. So recognize the city is working on these things, we’ll do the best we can to work through this with you and promise to keep you informed.”

Contact Seth Gulledge at Sgulledge@reflector.com and 329-9579. Follow him on Twitter @GulledgeSeth
Interesting stuff. Absolutely right about the $5 fine.

I have had very little issue with finding a parking space when I needed one in uptown. Even the few times I've had to go to the courthouse, I was able to find a spot within walking distance after a couple of minutes. But I'm also willing to park more than a block from where I want to go and am willing to walk an extra 2 minutes to & from my car.

IMO, their immediate focus should be on the Dickinson Ave area. That's the only place I've had trouble finding parking lately. There's a large lot behind the Go Science building that is marked as "No Parking" and other than a few on street parking spaces, there really isn't anywhere else to park over there. It's funny that I used to park in the Dickinson area when doing stuff uptown because there wasn't anything else over there. With all the new places in that area, I'm having a tougher time finding a spot. Turning the lot behind Go Science to a public lot after 5pm & on weekends would be a good start.

With all the new places opening in the next 6 months on Dickinson, those cars are going to have to go somewhere. That's the area you have to worry about people not visiting because of lack of parking.

Last edited by michealbond; 12-01-2017 at 06:36 AM..
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Old 12-01-2017, 07:04 AM
 
2,403 posts, read 3,376,481 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Slay The Great View Post
https://www.ncdot.gov/download/proje...01a_1_comp.pdf

https://www.ncdot.gov/download/proje...01a_2_comp.pdf

https://www.ncdot.gov/download/proje...01a_3_comp.pdf

https://www.ncdot.gov/download/proje...01a_4_comp.pdf

https://www.ncdot.gov/download/proje...01a_5_comp.pdf

These drawings were planned in 1998, It would help a lot to get from Greenville all the way to Atlantic Beach. Really, I think Highway 43 needs widening and nice design I don't want to see an ugly design, There needs to be lighting really.

I don't know what the hell they did with the connector plan, they might of just removed it from the STIP i guess.
That's the New Bern bypass and doesnt address Vanceboro or Greenville at all.

The end of that project when its built, should just be a dropoff point to Business 17 and the Hwy 17 continued to the WEST of Vanceboro as a bypass, which would then tie it back to Hwy 43. Then 43 can be widened from Greenville to Vanceboro to a standard like 11 was from Greenville to Kinston or 264 was from Washington to Greenville. A 4 lane divided but not limited access.

in that scenario, you have a safe, higher capacity connection to Vanceboro and prior to, get on a limited access road that connects to Highway 70 north of New Bern, which the ability to go East on 70 (I-42) toward Havelock/Morehead City or continue on 17 to Jacksonville/Wilmington.

I have seen no plans dealing with Vanceboro and no plans regarding increasing capacity and safety on 43.
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Old 12-01-2017, 07:13 AM
 
Location: Greenville, NC
840 posts, read 1,042,691 times
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Quote:
With all the new places opening in the next 6 months on Dickinson, those cars are going to have to go somewhere. That's the area you have to worry about people not visiting because of lack of parking.
^This. I have been wanting to go try out the smash waffles place, but darn if I can find a parking spot on Dickenson. I know the current construction is not helping, but they really need to look at a parking deck in that area for the future, possibly on that old warehouse land they are trying to develop.
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Old 12-01-2017, 07:40 AM
 
1,022 posts, read 1,009,636 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jpirate View Post
^This. I have been wanting to go try out the smash waffles place, but darn if I can find a parking spot on Dickenson. I know the current construction is not helping, but they really need to look at a parking deck in that area for the future, possibly on that old warehouse land they are trying to develop.
Smash Waffles is really good!

I thought the city bought and is sitting on a bunch of lots in the Dickinson area. I believe they are letting the police use one lot to park cruisers in. I think it was covered here that a parking lot will be built on Clark Street across from the GTAC at some point. They should really look into turning another lot or two into at least temporary parking areas.
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Old 12-01-2017, 08:40 AM
 
Location: Greenville, NC
171 posts, read 120,457 times
Reputation: 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by michealbond View Post
Smash Waffles is really good!

I thought the city bought and is sitting on a bunch of lots in the Dickinson area. I believe they are letting the police use one lot to park cruisers in. I think it was covered here that a parking lot will be built on Clark Street across from the GTAC at some point. They should really look into turning another lot or two into at least temporary parking areas.
The Dickinson Avenue Arts District plan discusses a parking garage immediately adjacent to the 10th street connector, where construction equipment is currently located. I believe the Imperial plan also contains a parking garage at the remote north end, associated with market-rate housing.

95% of visitors coming by automobile is a problem -- it means there's not a diversity of transportation options. Let's improve parking, yes, but let's look at decreasing motorized vehicle traffic. Increased transit usership alleviates the parking issues, as would bicycles. I'm constantly amazed at the number of students who drive their cars just a couple of blocks to park a bit closer to campus.

Speaking of bike news, public works should be pouring the slab for an inverted-U bike rack in the parklet across from Uptown Brewing in the next couple of weeks. Once it cures, the racks will be installed.
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Old 12-01-2017, 08:49 AM
 
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All that parking stuff is details that should just lead to one end. Parking Decks.

Parking Deck on the corner of Reade and Dickinson (next to the Bankruptcy Courthouse) and ECU should build a parking deck off Reade. If they need another, build a deck where the new surface lot is on Pitt and 5th.

GET RID OF SURFACE PARKING LOTS.

I capitalized that because they have no business in real downtowns. Once you determine the financing package to build decks you start building them, you reduce your on street parking, widen your sidewalks and turn Five Points into a real park. Hire all the parking consultants all you want, but the City Planning Department KNOWS this is the way to go. You will ELIMINATE the 5 minute drive around time to find a parking spot (just head to a deck) and eliminate the fact that people are not paying for their parking. And you will put more people on the sidewalk where the retailers want them.

Its sad that we even have to celebrate the sidewalks being power washed. Is that not a given?
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Old 12-01-2017, 03:14 PM
 
378 posts, read 254,764 times
Reputation: 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by HP91 View Post
All that parking stuff is details that should just lead to one end. Parking Decks.

Parking Deck on the corner of Reade and Dickinson (next to the Bankruptcy Courthouse) and ECU should build a parking deck off Reade. If they need another, build a deck where the new surface lot is on Pitt and 5th.

GET RID OF SURFACE PARKING LOTS.

I capitalized that because they have no business in real downtowns. Once you determine the financing package to build decks you start building them, you reduce your on street parking, widen your sidewalks and turn Five Points into a real park. Hire all the parking consultants all you want, but the City Planning Department KNOWS this is the way to go. You will ELIMINATE the 5 minute drive around time to find a parking spot (just head to a deck) and eliminate the fact that people are not paying for their parking. And you will put more people on the sidewalk where the retailers want them.

Its sad that we even have to celebrate the sidewalks being power washed. Is that not a given?
I agree. There should be parking decks to the hospital, ECU, and downtown. I didn't even realize that they were thinking the 4th st parking deck is too small for my taste. I want to see bigger ones built.
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Old 12-01-2017, 08:08 PM
 
294 posts, read 273,284 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HP91 View Post
That's the New Bern bypass and doesnt address Vanceboro or Greenville at all.

The end of that project when its built, should just be a dropoff point to Business 17 and the Hwy 17 continued to the WEST of Vanceboro as a bypass, which would then tie it back to Hwy 43. Then 43 can be widened from Greenville to Vanceboro to a standard like 11 was from Greenville to Kinston or 264 was from Washington to Greenville. A 4 lane divided but not limited access.

in that scenario, you have a safe, higher capacity connection to Vanceboro and prior to, get on a limited access road that connects to Highway 70 north of New Bern, which the ability to go East on 70 (I-42) toward Havelock/Morehead City or continue on 17 to Jacksonville/Wilmington.

I have seen no plans dealing with Vanceboro and no plans regarding increasing capacity and safety on 43.
I would guess that with the interstate grade from Greenville to Kinston that almost becomes the preferred route to NB anyway decreasing the need for 43 to be upgraded. Even more so if they eventually carry Harvey parkway to the east connecting to 42 for coastal traffic from points north.
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