U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > North Carolina > Coastal North Carolina
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 02-13-2018, 06:34 AM
 
Location: Greenville, NC
840 posts, read 1,042,020 times
Reputation: 176

Advertisements

Well, honestly it seems fair to me, I suppose, to allow this company to build their development. I can't say that I agree it's a good decision for the company to place student housing as a part of this development, but that is their problem to deal with in the future.

I know there was that study that found that the student housing market was saturated in Greenville...I'd be interested in knowing what developments have a lot of open rooms. I imagine it's not any of the newer complexes near campus or any of the recently renovated complexes. I'm guessing a large chunk of it is that complex out by North Campus Crossing. That is the first property that really needs to be renovated and switched to market rate housing if it wants to survive. The next places to go down hill will be Copper Beach (which is arguably already down hill) and 33 East.

The Davis, which is a bit further down Hwy 33 the road, seems to be run better and is more secluded, seems like they do ok.

It would be interesting to see what the report found if you excluded the complex out at North Campus Crossing for starters.

You also have to take into account all of the random dump apartments scattered in the Tar River Area between 5th & 1st streets. I forget about how many odd random strips of apartments there are around in there that are not maintained nor cared for and really need to be just bulldozed at this point.

I guess my point in all this incoherent rambling is, there seems to be too much student housing developments being built, but really I feel like it's just going to force the hand of these poorly managed current complexes to either right their ship, drop their price or switch their model.

I don't feel the city should be in the business of saying, "well...this complex built here first and they have been here for many years, so they get priority." It's a free market, if you run your property like you should and reinvest in it every so many years, and have an established good location...you shouldn't be overly concerned about the new competition because you're keeping up with the Jones's so to say. The property owners who collect their money and do not do any on site maintenance until something breaks...those are the ones that should be worried....and I'm ok with that. Do I want it to turn into section 8 housing...no, but I also don't want to see poorly managed properties prosper.

There are many opinions on this subject, I'm not saying mine is right or wrong, it's just my opinion.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 02-13-2018, 07:38 AM
 
2,401 posts, read 3,372,827 times
Reputation: 1406
Here is a link to The Retreat built at Penn State by Landmark (there is an older Retreat at NC State on Hillsborough St)...

The Retreat at State College - Landmark Properties

IMO, considering this is across the street from an existing student housing complex on Charles, will likely be somewhat suburban in nature, and the development of this farm (inside of Firetower Rd) will include single family, market rate, and offices...I really dont have a problem with this one.

If there is one complex that should switch to Market Rate, its The Bellamy. Its across the street from market rate, is considered some of the best schools in Pitt Co and is on the south side of Firetower Rd. It really has no business being a student housing complex and could support being market rate in school districts that have a demand for apartments (mostly single family). And why cant you have 4 bedroom units for families?

Trade one for the other and Greenville would be better served.

Finally, there needs to continue to be pressure put on by the City for old complexes to have active code enforcement, drug raids, etc...the new stuff isnt really the problem, its the old stuff that becomes a problem.

What the City could do is modify their Student Housing zoning codes to ONLY high density within a mile of campus (North Campus is technically adjacent to ECU)..and then switch to low density outside of that. Developers only build big nowadays so that would stop the big developments on the outskirts. Although I don't consider the Landmark development to be on the outskirts. Its surrounded by development.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-13-2018, 11:54 AM
 
294 posts, read 272,859 times
Reputation: 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by HP91 View Post
Here is a link to The Retreat built at Penn State by Landmark (there is an older Retreat at NC State on Hillsborough St)...

The Retreat at State College - Landmark Properties

IMO, considering this is across the street from an existing student housing complex on Charles, will likely be somewhat suburban in nature, and the development of this farm (inside of Firetower Rd) will include single family, market rate, and offices...I really dont have a problem with this one.
Agreed. Hell if it works out that I make it back to Greenville I'd consider living in a that neighborhood!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-14-2018, 06:27 PM
 
1,022 posts, read 1,008,326 times
Reputation: 367
ECU announces collaboration with SAS to boost research - Daily Reflector

Quote:
The Cary-based data analytics giant SAS will join an effort by East Carolina University to address economic, educational and health disparities in rural America, ECU announced on Tuesday.

Using analytics and data visualization, ECU and SAS will work together to support ECU’s recently launched Rural Prosperity Initiative as well as efforts to rapidly grow the university’s research enterprise, a news release said.

SAS will help ECU develop a new generation of technologies, microbusinesses and strategies to boost quality of life in rural North Carolina, the release said. In addition, professors, students and researchers will be able to access and apply advanced SAS analytics, business intelligence and data management software toward that goal.

“Working with SAS is just the kind of public-private relationship that we feel is the next step toward greatly expanding ECU’s research enterprise,” Chancellor Cecil Staton said in the release. “This collaboration in particular will provide critical resources and expertise to tackle the challenges in eastern North Carolina and, indeed, much of rural America. We hope this is just the start of a long, successful relationship.”

As part the initiative, ECU in September began work to establish a big data and analytics research cluster — one of eight research clusters intended to enlist faculty and researchers from across the university to focus university resources on combating health problems, fostering new economic opportunities and helping ECU and area K-12 schools produce more talent for today’s workforce.

A new facility will house the cluster on ECU’s future Millennial Campus so government and community leaders can work with ECU researchers to visualize and analyze big data in innovative ways, including virtual reality, in order to make more effective decisions, the news release said.

“Big data” refers to data sets with sizes beyond the ability of commonly used software tools to capture, curate, manage and process within a reasonable time. It can be unstructured, semi-structured and structured data; however, the main focus is on unstructured data. As such, it requires techniques and technologies with new forms of integration to reveal insights and make the information useful.

“In order to make the most effective decisions and investments to drive the economy and improve the quality of life in rural and coastal communities, ECU researchers must have access to insights that only big data and analytics can provide,” said Jay Golden, ECU vice chancellor for research, economic development and engagement. “SAS Analytics will help our ECU faculty and students discover the ‘why’ behind the data by uncovering hidden relationships and trends.

“Using predictive analytics and forecasting tools, ECU researchers and our community partners will be able to dig deeper into ‘what if’ and ‘what next’ scenarios – a capability lacking in the past,” Golden said. “We are very appreciative of SAS’ generous support of ECU’s mission and look forward to further enhancing our partnership.”

SAS also will provide teaching materials and on-site training for faculty and staff and help develop analytical programs. Researchers and students will be able to integrate SAS software into their research and engagement activities, giving students hands-on experience with this highly marketable skill.

“This is an opportunity for SAS to support a university initiative that benefits the people of our home state,” said Emily Baranello, vice president of the SAS Education Practice. “ECU’s research, powered by the data and analytics at the heart of innovation today, could transform the lives and futures of rural North Carolinians.”
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-14-2018, 07:03 PM
 
Location: Danville, VA
4,707 posts, read 3,089,846 times
Reputation: 2942
When I first saw SAS, I immediately thought "Wtf is the British Special Air Service doing with ECU?"

Then I read the article.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-15-2018, 05:20 AM
 
Location: Greenville, NC
167 posts, read 118,985 times
Reputation: 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by LM117 View Post
When I first saw SAS, I immediately thought "Wtf is the British Special Air Service doing with ECU?"

Then I read the article.
Huge deal - and this is exactly why Golden was brought in. ECU needs these kinds of industry interactions/connections as it tries to grow its profile. Can't wait to see what kinds of data insights they can throw our way.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-15-2018, 07:09 AM
 
2,401 posts, read 3,372,827 times
Reputation: 1406
The SAS deal is biggest for the 10th St corridor and Millennial Campus. It will bring in other companies, which will expedite the revitalization effort of the warehouse district.

Anyone still think a hotel on the Imperial Site near the Millennial campus isn't warranted? By the way New Bern is working on a plan to lure a new downtown hotel...

New hotel part of plans for downtown New Bern | WCTI
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-15-2018, 09:49 AM
 
1,677 posts, read 2,047,197 times
Reputation: 1074
Farmville decides to build new public library
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-16-2018, 09:39 AM
 
Location: Winterville
181 posts, read 215,712 times
Reputation: 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by jpirate View Post
I don't feel the city should be in the business of saying, "well...this complex built here first and they have been here for many years, so they get priority." It's a free market, if you run your property like you should and reinvest in it every so many years, and have an established good location...you shouldn't be overly concerned about the new competition because you're keeping up with the Jones's so to say. The property owners who collect their money and do not do any on site maintenance until something breaks...those are the ones that should be worried....and I'm ok with that. Do I want it to turn into section 8 housing...no, but I also don't want to see poorly managed properties prosper.

There are many opinions on this subject, I'm not saying mine is right or wrong, it's just my opinion.
Exactly. Let the market decide.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-16-2018, 09:42 AM
 
109 posts, read 104,491 times
Reputation: 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by HP91 View Post
The SAS deal is biggest for the 10th St corridor and Millennial Campus. It will bring in other companies, which will expedite the revitalization effort of the warehouse district.

Anyone still think a hotel on the Imperial Site near the Millennial campus isn't warranted? By the way New Bern is working on a plan to lure a new downtown hotel...

New hotel part of plans for downtown New Bern | WCTI
NB residents don't want a hotel in any of the sites they've outlined though
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:



Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > North Carolina > Coastal North Carolina
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top