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Old 11-06-2009, 01:31 PM
 
Location: Coast of Somewhere Beautiful
2,337 posts, read 4,625,959 times
Reputation: 5738

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OK, I'm fully prepared to be flamed and broiled for this posting, just know in advance that no offense is intended. If I offend anyone, I sincerely apologize. I am just hoping there are a few Southerners on here who will understand my question and why I am asking it.

We grew up in SC, lived most of our lives between the two Carolinas, and have currently lived in Pawleys Island, SC, about 20 miles south of Myrtle Beach, for about 10 years. We were emotionally prepared for the growth that has occurred, but not for the cultural changes brought about by the migration of northern retirees. I'm not saying it's a bad thing, just not our thing. Our neighborhood is 70-80% transplants from the north, mostly NJ, NY, Ohio. We drive an hour inland once a week for lunch, just to hear another Southern accent. In a nutshell, we've grown weary of being the token Southerners.

We're ready to move. In our exploratory travels, we've been told by several realtors that Pawleys is typical of the Southern coast, and that we should not expect to find too much "South" left in coastal regions. We enjoy the coast, but have no reservations about moving back to inland SC or NC if that proves to be the better choice. We've spent time at Oak Island, Kure Beach, etc and know the Southport area reasonably well. We're seasoned on tourist traffic, limited restaurant choices. and driving distances for good shopping. We're also pretty good at entertaining ourselves. We can deal with all of that. Our big question is how Southern has Southport remained?

Please know this is meant to be a serious question. I have no intent on starting or interest in participating in a war of words. I would sincerely appreciate feedback from any Southport Southerners. Thanks.
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Old 11-06-2009, 02:10 PM
 
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No more than Pawley's. I always thought PI actually had a solid core of southerners who live on the island. Guess not.

I miss the southern coast too. But there's no going back is there?
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Old 11-06-2009, 02:10 PM
 
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As someone who grew up in NC I've never felt it to be as traditionally southern as SC. It also began welcoming transplants well before SC did. In our NC history class we were taught we didn't want to break away from the union but had no choice when Virginia did since the state at that point was sandwiched. The motto during the civil war was fight the north but argue with the south.

Have you looked at Florence SC? I don't know it but I get the impression it is very southern. I think Elizabeth city might be as well. I can only say that when I was in Wilmington I met someone from Ohio who lived in Southport and said there was a Cleveland brown fan club in the area.
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Old 11-06-2009, 07:45 PM
 
Location: Coast of Somewhere Beautiful
2,337 posts, read 4,625,959 times
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Quote:
I always thought PI actually had a solid core of southerners who live on the island...
Thanks for both responses. I should clarify that we live "in" Pawleys (the mainland) rather than "on" Pawleys (the island itself). Of the very small number of permanent island residents, the families that have been there a long time are in most cases of Southern lineage. Those who reside on the island recognize two classes - (1) islanders, and (2) insignificant others. It's a place where mainland locals tread lightly or risk $75 parking tickets and phantom speeding tickets. Tourists staying on the island are elevated slightly from the second class, but only until their rental contracts expire. The island is a world (and a town) unto itself. It relates in no way to its mainland neighbors.

I know what you're saying about the Browns fan club. Down here, it's the Steelers. Panthers fans are hard to come by.

I too, mourn the disappearance of Southern beaches, but perhaps it's a fact of life. We were in Carolina Beach NC last month to see Delbert McClinton. IMO, it still had a Southern atmosphere, if not the accent. If we decide to head inland, I suspect we'll keep on going further than Florence. It's a nice town but has its own issues, primarily economic. We enjoyed the piedmont area of both SC and NC. It's a little far from the coast, but I'm guessing it would still feel like home, and that's a feeling we have lost down here. Thanks again for your thoughts.
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Old 11-07-2009, 05:28 AM
 
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No problem, Pawleysdude. I think you should check out Southport. It won't be like Pawleys Island 1988, but I have never lived in Southport so I don't want to tell you what it will be like. I have enjoyed my visits, I know that it looks really cool.

If you go inland, I agree, go past Florence. If it were me I would check out all the upstate lakes, one by one, starting with Lake Wateree and Jocassee, and going from there. Best of luck.
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Old 11-07-2009, 10:55 AM
 
Location: Greenville, NC
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That trend of the Southern accent disappearing is happening everywhere in NC. I'm up by Greenville and when you go into a store here it's not often the clerk speaks with a Southern tongue. Pretty much I'd have to say that any place that's seen a lot of development is going to be that way. If you get out into the country or someplace like Kinston or Washington you can still hear a lot of Southern accents.
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Old 11-08-2009, 01:01 PM
 
Location: Charlotte NC
11,809 posts, read 9,403,309 times
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Just moved to southport from Brooklyn, NY. My wife was born in southport and still has a lot of family there. I'm originally from Pittsburgh and think the browns fan club thing is hilarious, the cape fear ships Chandler restaurant is decked out in steeler gear. I think I met the husband of the browns fan club creator and bought him a beer cause I felt bad for him. lol

I can't really tell you about the southern thing cause I'm a northerner and I think everyone has an accent down here. Is a southern accent in a bad or less desirable area more important than a good community with less southern accents?

Coming from Brooklyn it's nice to be around people who wave and speak all day long but I can't give you amy real info on the southern feel of southport because it's not really near or dear to my heart. The people are nice though... And that matters much more then what they sound like...
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Old 11-09-2009, 05:44 PM
 
Location: St. James, NC
169 posts, read 519,068 times
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Southport recently elected a self-professed 'YANKEE' to its Board of Aldermen. They also passed an ordinance to prevent cats from chasing cars (or at least to punish such errant felines (with death)).

BTW The "yankee" was from California...
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Old 11-09-2009, 06:09 PM
 
Location: Southport, NC
77 posts, read 205,783 times
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If you really want to be among Southerners, you will probably have to go up around Concord or Charlotte. Plenty of Southern folks up there. Might even venture a little farther West toward the hills.
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Old 11-09-2009, 10:05 PM
 
Location: Raleigh, NC
10,403 posts, read 19,449,722 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Martin View Post
That trend of the Southern accent disappearing is happening everywhere in NC. I'm up by Greenville and when you go into a store here it's not often the clerk speaks with a Southern tongue. Pretty much I'd have to say that any place that's seen a lot of development is going to be that way. If you get out into the country or someplace like Kinston or Washington you can still hear a lot of Southern accents.
I disagree with that--I live in none other than North Raleigh, and still encounter about 50-50 day-to-day. If you yourself have a Southern accent, you are more likely to hear it in others, because people's accents, when they grow up around both, tend to "mimic" the accent of the person they're talking to to at least some degree.
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