U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > North Carolina > Coastal North Carolina
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 01-30-2010, 10:23 AM
 
Location: Morehead City, NC
1,676 posts, read 5,354,974 times
Reputation: 1244

Advertisements

Wind Direction and Flooding

By: Bill Hitchcock

One of the most common questions I am asked about an area or property along the coast of North Carolina is, “Has it ever flooded here?”.

The short answer is “Yes!”. At some point in time, since the beginning of time anywhere coastal North Carolina has been underwater. But that’s not what this article is about.

One of the main causes for flooding is wind. What area gets flooded will depend on the direction of the wind and its strength. Unfortunately, most folks just think in terms of wind strength and not wind direction.

Here’s why the direction of the wind is so important. The coast of North Carolina, including the inner banks and outer banks has beaches and rivers and sounds that face all directions. If, for example we have a strong northerly wind this will help to push water from the north towards the southand up on and in to beaches, rivers and creeks facing north. The map below highlights my point.



Now if the wind is coming hard out of the south then the opposing (on the north side) beaches and rivers would have waters pushed in.

If the wind is in your face and you are facing water then the water is being pushed towards you. But-If you have the wind at your back and you are facing water then the waters will be pushed away from you.

I once owned a piece of waterfront property on Bogue Sound that faced south. One year we had a hurricane that brough 100mph winds out of the north. I was left high and dry while across the sound on Bogue Banks had severe flooding.

Storms and hurricanes come from all different directions. The coast of North Carolina faces all different directions. Each storm is different and will create a different effect. This is one of the reasons that makes responding to the question about flooding so difficult.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 01-30-2010, 11:44 AM
LLN
 
Location: Upstairs closet
4,981 posts, read 8,741,524 times
Reputation: 6450
That is a good post, Bill
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-06-2010, 04:13 PM
 
45 posts, read 155,087 times
Reputation: 45
So, in looking at soundfront property across coastal NC, are there any generalities one can assume that make certain areas safer to own than others? We're looking for soundfront properties now, and are first looking for a flood zone X, then trying to find areas that aren't high risk candidates for erosion, etc. I've been looking at the Colington area in the Outer Banks (fairly inexpensive with a good deal of property available), the Emerald Isle soundfront (east of "the point", but property is scarce and more expensive), and I'm just starting to research more southern locations (Surf City, Topsail, Carolina Beach, Long Beach, etc).

I have a soft spot for Carteret Co since we've been vacationing in Swansboro since I was born, but am trying to keep an open mind.

Thanks!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-06-2010, 05:35 PM
 
Location: Sunshine N'Blue Skies
13,320 posts, read 20,135,593 times
Reputation: 11645






Here are some new pictures taken this week before the heavy rain storm....Showing why you have to be careful in areas of water.....
Especially, ocean waters....Notice bladder bags filled to hold the sea back.
I know the process is neverending....I saw this action after the last hurricane washed streets and homes away. One home at that time stood very stately....way out into the ocean. Sad........ (taken on the coast of NC)
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-06-2010, 07:21 PM
LLN
 
Location: Upstairs closet
4,981 posts, read 8,741,524 times
Reputation: 6450
I would estimate that the water in New Bern dropped over 3 feet as the winds from the storm shifted from easterly to westerly over night. Water was VERY HIGH about sunset last night.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-07-2010, 04:10 AM
 
Location: Morehead City, NC
1,676 posts, read 5,354,974 times
Reputation: 1244
RobioAXP said, "We're looking for soundfront properties now, and are first looking for a flood zone X, then trying to find areas that aren't high risk candidates for erosion, etc."

FEMA Flood Zone designations generally reveal elevation. Which logically-The higher, the dryer! But that only holds true when you are considering a flood from a rising body of water. It does not, however take in to consideration soil type.
Soil type also relates to erosion too. For example-An oceanside beach sand is going to go bye-bye faster than a soundside beach "dirt".

Another example is that I know of waterfront property that hasn't flooded in 30 years but also know of inland property that floods almost every single time in rains.

Many, many things to consider when purchasing which go well beyond flood zone designation.
Let me know if I can help.

LLN-You highlighted the point wonderfully! It also demonstrates how dramatic the effect of wind can be AND how it isn't just hurricanes that cause "situations".
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-07-2010, 06:26 AM
 
Location: Morehead City, NC
1,676 posts, read 5,354,974 times
Reputation: 1244
Just had to add one more thing (cause I love the subject matter and its what I do!)
Below is a map of a bit of waterfront property in Beaufort County. The B&W area is not a flood prone hazard. The color overlay shows two additional flood hazard zones.
Note the waterfront property is not in a flood prone area while the property a quarter of a mile inland is.
Never use proximity to water as your only "guiding light"

Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-07-2010, 01:43 PM
 
45 posts, read 155,087 times
Reputation: 45
Very interesting. So, where do you find such informative maps?! I sent you a PM, Bill. Thanks for sharing some additional insight.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-08-2010, 06:18 AM
 
22,769 posts, read 26,198,481 times
Reputation: 14558
Quote:
Originally Posted by RobioAXP View Post
Very interesting. So, where do you find such informative maps?! I sent you a PM, Bill. Thanks for sharing some additional insight.
North Carolina Floodplain Mapping Program

this is a good place to start
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-08-2010, 07:24 AM
 
45 posts, read 155,087 times
Reputation: 45
Thanks! This is great!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:



Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > North Carolina > Coastal North Carolina
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top