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Old 02-17-2010, 08:37 AM
 
1 posts, read 2,708 times
Reputation: 12

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We are an older couple from Michigan, tired of snow and cold. We've made a few trips to Hickory, New Bern, Fayetteville looking for home to retire. We'd like to walk to town to restaurants, some shopping. We need good medical facilities, airport within 50 miles and probably couldn't take the high humidity of S. C. but want longer warmer summers. We are not church going people so would like area that is tolerant of new comers that are quiet but would like a YMCA or similar facility and library close by. Any suggestions?
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Old 02-17-2010, 03:38 PM
 
Location: Swansboro
148 posts, read 556,014 times
Reputation: 69
I would suggest that you checkout Swansboro NC...Plenty of restaurants to walk to, good medical services, Nice airport less than 40 miles away, close to beach, water, library in town, wellness centers in Swansboro, and Cape Carteret, I prefer the one in Cape Carteret...

Plenty of available homes for sale or rent in these areas...
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Old 02-17-2010, 03:48 PM
 
4,108 posts, read 6,433,872 times
Reputation: 4202
Southern NC coastal areas have tropical humidity in the summer.
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Old 02-17-2010, 08:38 PM
 
69 posts, read 160,290 times
Reputation: 100
If you don't want hot humid summers you should be looking in the mountains not the coast. Even Washington DC is hot and humid in the summer. The piedmont is less humid but the temps can rise higher than the coast. Winston Salem is slightly cooler than the other piedmont towns and is very close to Boone. Boone at 3000 feet has cooler summers than NE but their winters are comparable to Pennsylvania.
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Old 02-18-2010, 06:34 AM
 
Location: North Carolina
1,077 posts, read 3,151,778 times
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NC has very high humidity as well. Make sure your place has very good air conditioning because if not, you may be at risk of heat strokes or even suicide.
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Old 02-18-2010, 08:43 AM
 
100 posts, read 260,311 times
Reputation: 50
There is no place on the NC coast that will give you what you want. The best medical facilities in coastal NC are in Wilmington and they are nothing compared to Duke or UNC.

If you are interested in a place that has a hospital and you are a little over an hour to major facilities, check out Manteo, NC.
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Old 02-18-2010, 08:48 AM
NCN
 
Location: NC/SC Border Patrol
21,135 posts, read 21,928,047 times
Reputation: 23222
I grew up in the mountains of North Carolina and the humidity is all over the state, not as one poster said to try the mountains. If you don't want humidity, stay out of the South. It is all humid. Check the City-Data city information and the weather review there. You may try the Outer Banks and get a breeze in the Summer. It also rains sideways there.
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Old 02-18-2010, 10:07 PM
 
Location: Cape Carteret, NC
713 posts, read 3,477,448 times
Reputation: 543
Smile A perspective on NC, heat, and humidity

As someone who was born in NC and has lived from the mountains to the coast and all the way up to eastern Canada. I think I can offer a perspective on heat and humidity that comes from experience not conjecture.

Growing up in the fifties just west of Winston-Salem, we did not even have an air condition until I was 12 or 13, and then it was just for one room. We did fine, Sundays under the shade tree were pretty special, but it is the south and it does get hot. Heat was just part of life. Heat pumps and central air changed all that.

Eventually after college in the NE, we ended up in Nova Scotia and New Brunswick. While Nova Scotia never really got hot, New Brunswick could get very warm and very cold. Just before we moved back to the states in 1987, our house in Halifax did not have an air conditioner and certainly did not need one except for one or two days a year.

We moved to Columbia, MD and it was close to climate shock. Maryland and DC are very warm, humid, and lacking in breezes. We spent a lot of time in the house until we got used to the weather.

After a couple of years there we moved to the side of a mountain in Roanoke, Va. There on the mountain we found plenty of breezes and sometimes they run around 50-60 mph. It is less humid than the DC area, but still warm. We just left there a few days ago, and it is not a good place to escape snow this winter.

We lived in Roanoke twenty years and also had a home in Mt. Airy, NC in the foothills below the Blueridge Parkway, and in 2006 got a home on the NC coast hear Cape Carteret.

We are 2.5 hours from Raleigh, about 45 minutes from New Bern, and 90 minutes from Wilmington. I have been going to the Northern Outer Banks for over 50 years. I love them, but I would rather live where I am.

We live on the shores of the White Oak River about ten minutes by boat from the Intracoastal Waterway and ten minutes by car from the beaches of Emerald Isle.

I have found the climate here more temperate than the other places I lived in North Carolina or Virginia. It is warmer in the winter and cooler in the summer. There is a period in the summer, sometimes six weeks and other years longer that it does get hot. However, it does not get as hot and humid as it does in interior NC or in South Carolina. Check the climate records and you will see that what I say is correct. I am a weather junkie.

Our home here on the coast is on the water. We get near continuous breezes but are sheltered from storms. Our house has one side with lots of windows facing the south. It is a very pleasant place to live. The pansies that are thriving by our garage door are a testament to the nice climate.

We have very few flying insects, and in spite of qualifying for a senior discount I have managed to mow my yard with a walk behind mower all through the summer for the last three years.

Some of the things you learn to do are keep your air conditioner set on 78, otherwise you feel like you are walking into a meat locker when you come inside. Wear light, loose fitting clothes, and when it gets really hot, go jump in the ocean. There are some days when it is too hot to do much, but if you let that scare you away, you will be missing one of the nicest places to live on earth.

Fall and spring are magnificent. We often sleep with the windows open. This has been an exceptionally cold and unusual winter and still it was 50F here today at our house in Bluewater Cove. My "winter" coat would be laughed at by Canadians.

The truth is that you get used to the humidity and heat. That being said there is a difference in the climate across the south. We can go ten miles inland in the summer and the temperature jumps ten degrees or more.

There are times when the river water is warm and only the ocean offers relief but that warm water makes for fall warmth that can last into December. I picked my last tomato on December 19th last year and got my first one the first week of June.

As to living in the mountains of North Carolina, our friends who live in Boone just headed to Florida, they couldn't take the snow any longer.

Don't let people scare you way from the NC coast. Put shorts and a tee-shirt on and embrace the warmth. It is better than shoveling snow. I have done both, and given a choice, I will be right here near the beaches of Emerald Isle.

Check out my blog on living here and the site where I have area pictures and information posted.

Last edited by dsobotta; 02-18-2010 at 10:10 PM.. Reason: left out word
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Old 02-19-2010, 04:48 PM
 
Location: New Jersey
844 posts, read 2,681,850 times
Reputation: 660
Dsobotta,

Have always found your posts interesting. You somehow manage to always keep things in perspective. Keep posting, and providing your valuable insight!

marc
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Old 02-19-2010, 08:29 PM
 
214 posts, read 737,686 times
Reputation: 128
Quote:
Originally Posted by dsobotta View Post
As someone who was born in NC and has lived from the mountains to the coast and all the way up to eastern Canada. I think I can offer a perspective on heat and humidity that comes from experience not conjecture.

Growing up in the fifties just west of Winston-Salem, we did not even have an air condition until I was 12 or 13, and then it was just for one room. We did fine, Sundays under the shade tree were pretty special, but it is the south and it does get hot. Heat was just part of life. Heat pumps and central air changed all that.

Eventually after college in the NE, we ended up in Nova Scotia and New Brunswick. While Nova Scotia never really got hot, New Brunswick could get very warm and very cold. Just before we moved back to the states in 1987, our house in Halifax did not have an air conditioner and certainly did not need one except for one or two days a year.

We moved to Columbia, MD and it was close to climate shock. Maryland and DC are very warm, humid, and lacking in breezes. We spent a lot of time in the house until we got used to the weather.

After a couple of years there we moved to the side of a mountain in Roanoke, Va. There on the mountain we found plenty of breezes and sometimes they run around 50-60 mph. It is less humid than the DC area, but still warm. We just left there a few days ago, and it is not a good place to escape snow this winter.

We lived in Roanoke twenty years and also had a home in Mt. Airy, NC in the foothills below the Blueridge Parkway, and in 2006 got a home on the NC coast hear Cape Carteret.

We are 2.5 hours from Raleigh, about 45 minutes from New Bern, and 90 minutes from Wilmington. I have been going to the Northern Outer Banks for over 50 years. I love them, but I would rather live where I am.

We live on the shores of the White Oak River about ten minutes by boat from the Intracoastal Waterway and ten minutes by car from the beaches of Emerald Isle.

I have found the climate here more temperate than the other places I lived in North Carolina or Virginia. It is warmer in the winter and cooler in the summer. There is a period in the summer, sometimes six weeks and other years longer that it does get hot. However, it does not get as hot and humid as it does in interior NC or in South Carolina. Check the climate records and you will see that what I say is correct. I am a weather junkie.

Our home here on the coast is on the water. We get near continuous breezes but are sheltered from storms. Our house has one side with lots of windows facing the south. It is a very pleasant place to live. The pansies that are thriving by our garage door are a testament to the nice climate.

We have very few flying insects, and in spite of qualifying for a senior discount I have managed to mow my yard with a walk behind mower all through the summer for the last three years.

Some of the things you learn to do are keep your air conditioner set on 78, otherwise you feel like you are walking into a meat locker when you come inside. Wear light, loose fitting clothes, and when it gets really hot, go jump in the ocean. There are some days when it is too hot to do much, but if you let that scare you away, you will be missing one of the nicest places to live on earth.

Fall and spring are magnificent. We often sleep with the windows open. This has been an exceptionally cold and unusual winter and still it was 50F here today at our house in Bluewater Cove. My "winter" coat would be laughed at by Canadians.

The truth is that you get used to the humidity and heat. That being said there is a difference in the climate across the south. We can go ten miles inland in the summer and the temperature jumps ten degrees or more.

There are times when the river water is warm and only the ocean offers relief but that warm water makes for fall warmth that can last into December. I picked my last tomato on December 19th last year and got my first one the first week of June.

As to living in the mountains of North Carolina, our friends who live in Boone just headed to Florida, they couldn't take the snow any longer.

Don't let people scare you way from the NC coast. Put shorts and a tee-shirt on and embrace the warmth. It is better than shoveling snow. I have done both, and given a choice, I will be right here near the beaches of Emerald Isle.

Check out my blog on living here and the site where I have area pictures and information posted.
AMEN!!!!!!!
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